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The Resident

The Resident – None The Wiser (1×05)



Is anyone completely disgusted with what happened on tonight’s The Resident and more specifically, how the established, head surgeons handled the situations? I mean seriously, I don’t care how many 5-star Yelp reviews Dr. Bell receives, it’s known that he routinely kills patients and refuses to take the blame. Why is he continuously getting away with it?

He also shouldn’t be allowed to sabotage other careers because of his horrible calls, while at the same time ruining Dr. Leonard, who really seemed to have a good head on her shoulders and a patient-focused outlook.


The opening scene finds Dr. Okafor in the hot seat for a three-patient mix-up that happened 12-hours prior.

In the flashbacks, we see Thorpe and Bell discussing concurrent surgeries. Leonard tries to dissuade them from it because doing multiple things at once forces them to split focus and thus, welcomes chaos and mistakes into the operating room.

However, this is a hospital that operates with the money-first mentality so everyone ignores her warnings.

We’re introduced to our three patients and it’s a little bittersweet because we simply want to warn them that things are about to get really messy, but we can’t.

We have Christine, a single mother who refuses to see a doctor because of her fear of hospital bills. Her son and Nic band together convince her to get checked out and it’s a good thing she listens to them because she’s diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm. I’m no doctor but the ones on TV tell me it’s dangerous; if it ruptures, she dies.

Then, there’s York, one of Conrad’s favorite patients due to his penchant for sticking things up his rectum.

Conrad finds pleasure in educating Dr. Privesh “on the frequency and creative nature,” which brings a comedic tone to a rather grim episode. And in turn, watching Privesh squirm while trying to remove the “Princess of Pancakes” from York’s butt while he scolds him for not being “present” is equally as entertaining.

Of course, York’s favorite past time is writing Yelp reviews of the Chastain doctors and Privesh’s is as negative as it gets. York ridiculously blames the lodged piece of family-sized maple syrup in his body, which now requires surgery.

Finally, we have Ed who needs to have one of his testicles removed. It’s not something any man wants to hear, but the doctors assure him he’ll still have one testicle left and “one good one is all you need” to have kids.

Three very likable patients unknowingly going into the biggest mess I’ve ever seen in a TV hospital setting.

There are many things that go wrong before the surgeries and all can be chalked up to Bell’s carelessness and lack of repercussions.

For one, Dr. Bell finds himself spacing out on multiple occasions because of the pills he’s been taking. That doesn’t stop him from being a pretentious asshole, but still, everyone quickly catches on that “something is wrong.” Yet no one actually takes any time to look into it further.

Confident that he can take on multiple surgeries, Bell forces Dr. Bradley to stay and help out, even though he’s just worked a 30-hour shift. Is that legal? Personally, I do not want to be a patient with an overworked and sleep-deprived doctor.

Then, there’s the obvious lack of surgeons. When they begin all the surgeries, it’s really only Bradley, Okafor and Jude assisting Bell. And when each patient starts exhibiting problems, Bell only leans on Okafor for help.

Granted, the problems start when Bradley loses consciousness mid-operation and plummets to the ground pulling out what looks like major body parts from a patient. Yeah, I definitely almost coughed up my dinner as I was watching that.

His collapse sends the operating rooms into a frenzy, with Okafor running back and forth between patients like a chicken with her head cut off. These are life-threatening surgeries and one doctor is trying to get them all done; her head is spinning and she’s bound to make a few mistakes, I think that’s pretty evident to everyone except Bell.

In all of the chaos, Okafor accidentally removed both of Ed’s testicles, taking away their ability to ever have a child; Christine crashed and Jude’s patient passed. I don’t even recall what happened to York — does anyone know if he made it out so he can return in a future episode with yet another unrecognizable object stuck way up there?

So now we’re back to start with Okafor getting grilled for the botched up surgeries. Except this time we know that it wasn’t her fault. Even the smartest of surgeons, which Bell technically is, would easily mess this up.

When Leonard turns to Bell for some clarification on what happened, he compares himself to Mozart, teaching the next generation of surgeons. Here comes the most FRUSTRATING line to ever come out of this entitled man’s mouth: “I pushed her and on this day, she simply wasn’t ready.”

I mean, every resident is shaking their head at this point because Bell is just so full of it. How can you literally blame the highly-skilled, but still in training, girl who tried her very best?

Publically, Okafor gets shamed by Bell, but when Thorpe asks him how they should proceed, he vouches for Okafor saying she’s one of the most gifted surgeons and needs to stay on the team.

The only reason he sees her as “invaluable” is that he needs someone to save his ass over and over and knows that she’ll do it. But for how long?

I have to say, after the day Mina had, I’d understand if she just retreated to the comfort of her couch and stayed there until her next shift. But nope, homegirl puts on her red, self-created dress and goes to “unwind.” Props, girl. I don’t know how these doctors do it.

Here comes the most heartwarming moment of the series thus far: Dr. Irving telling her she looks stunning. He’s always trying to make a move on her but I applaud him for not being too pushy and simply giving a compliment after a rough day.

Conrad wasn’t the main focus of the episode, which was nice for a change. However, we still saw him struggling with the possibility of Nic dating Jude, even having an outburst because of it disguised as a “work concern.” Personally, Jude doesn’t even need to be on this show. Nic and Conrad have something special and I want to dig more into that; what happened between them? Why didn’t it work out?

Nic got herself into some hot water with Dr. Hunter, who found out she had been snooping around her clinic and trying to tell her patients to get a second opinion. Did she overstep? Gravely. But at least she’s still doing it for the patients.

Hunter is very unlikeable and if she’s this upset with Nic for wanting to know “more” than it definitely means she has something to hide. As Nic put it, more chemo = more money. And time and time again, this show has proven that these doctors will do anything for more cash.

When an investor rejects Bell’s life-saving tool for being too risky, Thorpe offers him a tour of the cancer facility because “cancer is the number one revenue stream.” Isn’t that depressing? A disease that kills millions a year is singlehandedly keeping them in business and as such, they turn a blind eye to whatever Hunter is doing to bring in that money, I’m sure.

At first, I couldn’t figure out why this investor was so important or why Nic randomly brought up Conrad’s father. Do people just assume that when someone is mad or lashing out it’s because of parents and something that happened in their childhood? However, in the end it all came together — the money hungry investor was actually Conrad’s father.

The reason he hates him so much, other than the fact that he kept his late mother from him, is because they don’t see eye-to-eye. Conrad is all about helping people and he’ll put his career on the line for a patient, while his father only cares about capitalizing on the “winning horse.”

I can’t wait to see how this plays out. Will Conrad’s strained relationship with his father lead to a reconciliation with Nic?

Thoughts on The Resident? Who else can’t wait for Dr. Bell to finally get what’s coming to him?

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The Resident

The Resident – Family Affair (1×08)



The Resident Family Affairs

As the old saying goes, never judge a book by its cover. Especially when it comes to patients.

When a deranged, homeless woman crashes a donors party at Chastain, Bell and Lane are floored and demand to know how she got past security.

But that doesn’t matter much to Conrad and Nic, who immediately run over because their number one priority isn’t cocktails and hors oeuvre’s, it’s taking care of patients.

The Resident continuously puts a large emphasis on a hospital’s need for money, and while much of it is rooted in reality — the idea has to come from somewhere — it’s slightly exaggerated.

I admired them for pulling the curtain on the dark side, the ugly-side of medicine, but it’s coming at a cost of the series. Everything is financially motivated.

While a hospital cannot function if it’s not making enough to keep its doors open, it would be nice for someone other than Nic, Devon, Mina and Conrad to actually give a crap about the patients, not just the ones with a thick stack of cash. I’d think optics would be equally as important as how much money is being funneled through.

Everything revolves around money; every patient they admit, every test they run, every decision they make. It’s exhausting to the viewers; I found myself wanting to scream “we get it” on several occasions this week.

Surely, that’s how the other doctors actually feel about the money-machine being shoved down their throats and their priorities being shifted from patient care to billing.

It’s no surprise they are trying to find ways around the system instead of “treating and streeting” patients, which Bell would have preferred until Mina made the discovery that their Jane Doe was actually Sara Ravenscroft, a daughter of a wealthy philanthropist in Savannah.

Did you see Bell’s eyes almost light up in dollar signs?

Turns out, sometimes just having a patient’s best interest at heart comes with a healthy reward. Maybe next time, he’ll think twice before turning someone away or dumping them on the steps of another hospital.

Is that really something that happens? Or is that a misconception? Atlanta General’s loss was Chastain’s gain.

It’s absurd how a patients treatment differs with a change in status and wealth.

Nic calls Sara’s parents, but her mother is adamant that her daughter is schizophrenic. Her solution? Give her the pills she needs and they’ll pay the bill.

Sometimes, people believe that their expensive doctors would never botch up a diagnosis,  but in this case, some measly residents were able to unearth the real issue causing Sara to display mentally ill symptoms.

Once again, I think this storyline was beefed up for the sake of television. Wouldn’t an experienced doctor do a full workup and eliminate every other medical condition before arriving at a diagnosis? Then again saying someone has a psychological disorder is a lot easier than finding the root cause.

And even then, the only way to convince Bell to buy them some time was by spelling out that saving Sara meant financially grateful parents. Come on, Bell!

It was almost comical when he had the nerve to declare, “it’s not always about money.” Actually, on this show, it is. I would hate to be the kind of person that was solely motivated by the green stuff.

Keeping in line with the familial theme, Dr. Pravesh had a break-through with his parent’s thanks to some wise advice from a male gigolo er, male escort.

I can’t imagine how difficult it must be to marry into a different caste, especially one that has different priorities and traditions than you do. Devon mentions that the ideologies are so outdated but definitely buys into them himself.

His father is worried that his fiancee’s father might think he’s lesser because he’s just a cab driver, but that’s actually what Devon thinks. He’s scared that when the two families meet, her parents will deem him not good enough.

And sadly, his worries manifest onto his parents, who are at the receiving end of his wrath.

My mother always told me never to be embarrassed of your parents because they are the ones that gave you life. Regardless of who they are or what they believe, they have always been there for you, just like Devon’s parents were there for him, working seven days a week just to get him through medical school.

As a daughter of immigrants, I loved this storyline because it is so true — these parents came here with nothing and managed to build a life for themselves and simultaneously, a better life for their children who have been given endless opportunities to become whatever and whoever they want to be.

Don’t ever take that for granted and don’t ever be ashamed of that. Seriously, go give your parents a hug right now and say thank you.

Immigrants deserve so much recognition!

Devon’s wedding is definitely going to be an event.

Maybe Mina will even take Micah as her date? Someone is bound to break through her tough exterior. Although, I can definitely respect her desire to focus on her studies and distance herself from distractions such as flirtatious patients.

Speaking of, Conrad and Nic spent the whole episode working side-by-side and actually enjoyed it. Is their reunion on the horizon?

Thoughts on this week’s The Resident?


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The Resident

The Resident – No Matter The Cost (1×06)



The Resident No Matter the Cost

Family issues, a mysterious disease an one doctor’s major secrets shape this week’s The Resident.

The episode kicks off with a pretty ominous scene featuring Dr. Okafor as she heads home from what we’re sure was a long shift.

The angles set-up for an obvious attack, but what we don’t expect is Mina to ninja-out on the assailant who’s just looking to score his next hit.

Her self-defense is so on point, Akiba, as we later find out his name, is knocked-out, and Mina is forced to return to Chastain. She can never get a break from that place.

Everyone is impressed with her ability to take care of herself but no one more than Irving, who harbors a major crush on her.

Since the premiere, there have been several moments where the series falsely depicts the patient/doctor relationship. Nic’s decision to take Akiba home since no one was willing to pick him up and convincing his parents to give him another chance at sobriety is one of those moments.

I understand not wanting to let a patient go back into the streets, especially if you have family who has gone through addiction like Nic reveals about her sister, but becoming “too involved” is dangerous and sets a terrible precedent.

Also, the false hope she gave the mother who knew damn well this time wouldn’t be any different was cringe-worthy.

I’ve said I wanted to find out more about Mina — her backstory, what makes her such a good doctor, why she’s silent but deadly and we got more than we bargained for when Nic followed her home after she received an urgent call.

Turns out, Mina is running a little hospital from inside her home. Once again, this is illegal. It seems like the doctors at Chastain have a penchant for doing things that can get their license suspended.

The Resident No Matter the Cost

The Resident/ Fox

But she does bring up a good point — if she doesn’t help these patients, who will? Nic recommended clinics but as Mina pointed out hospitals are closing clinics for lack of profit.

And again, we circle back to the premise of hospitals putting money over patient care.

It’s a nice segway to Dr. Hunter, the renowned oncologist that Nic has always been skeptical of. Her persuasiveness even got her kicked off the team.

Hunter’s decision to remove Nic was all the proof I needed to know that she was running a shady “private clinic.”

When Nic looped in Pravesh, who has taken her spot, he dismissed her concerns as just a “misunderstanding with Lane.”

Yet the more he talked to Lily, the bone-marrow transplant patient, the more Nic’s concerns resonated.

Eventually, he threw caution to the wind in what I’m assuming is another illegal behavior by an intern and ordered a full lab on Lily. The results were gravely different from the story Lane and her clinic had been spewing; Lily has kidney failure and if she were to undergo the procedure, she would definitely die.

Pravesh brought the situation to Lane’s attention and she did exactly what we’d expect her to do — save face. She blamed the employees at her clinic, commended him for catching the error and stormed off with an expression that clearly displayed her anger at getting caught.

When Pravesh told Nic, she gave him the “I told you so stare” before explaining that bone marrow transplants are the “Super Bowl” when it comes to billing.

Money-talk aside, this is a doctor that people trust who was willing to let her young patient die in order to up her paycheck.

Clearly, she needs to be stopped but if you know anything about people in power, you know that isn’t an easy feat. Pravesh and Nic can’t simply walk up to the director and point fingers without getting the fall-out.

They need to go about this in a smart way. Realistically, what can they do?

There seems to be a discord with the attending physicians and the residents over who is right, especially when it comes to Conrad.

Wilmot and the other doctors descended like vultures onto one of Conrad’s patients who he promised not to continue prodding and poking for the sake of finding the root of his pain.

When Conrad tried to tell them to back-off, he was removed from the case with the doctor even threatening to get rid of him.

And even after Wilmot screwed up, there were no real repercussions to his actions simply because he had seniority over Conrad.

In fact, anytime Conrad disagrees with someone (and he’s usually right), everyone accuses him of his God complex, which doesn’t seem logical.

Yes, Conrad is assertive but he also isn’t here to bill a patient for unnecessary tests when he can just talk to him and paint a clearer picture.

That’s how he was able to pinpoint the root of his patient’s problem and find a solution.

If the doctors continue riding on their high-horse while making irrational calls that will only steal them a “w,” I could see Conrad getting so fed up his father’s offer of running a small private hospital might actually seem like a promising idea.

Yes, he would still be buying his son by giving him what he’s always wanted — a hospital where he doesn’t have to deal with the greedy and bureaucratic mess — but at least Conrad would actually make a difference.

Conrad’s been getting hit from all sides of the emotional spectrum; his father came back, he’s getting push-back on how he should treat his patients and lastly, Nic is getting cozy with Jude.

When Mina confronted Nic about “sleeping with” Jude, Nic refuted the rumors and she’s wasn’t lying — there’s nothing happening between them. Although, Jude would really love for that to change that.

However, from the outside-looking-in, it definitely feels like more is going on, which is why Conrad semi blew-up on her at the end of the episode and apologized for continuing to think there was a chance after she told him repeatedly that they were through.

We all know that the reason why Nic isn’t into Jude is because she still has feelings for Conrad, she’s just too afraid to admit it. This coming from a girl who wasn’t afraid to go after an oncologist for mistreating patients.

In the top tier, we have Dr. Bell who is assigned to convince top-rated surgeon, Dr. Carver, to take up a position at Chastain. Everything was going swell until Carver inquired about the error rates. He was adamant that his new hospital would be transparent about them, which would obviously put an end to Bell’s career. He didn’t earn the nickname HODAD for no reason.

Bell decided to shut down the idea of hiring Carver by allowing Thorpe to think it was her decision; he gently reminded her how much money that kind of knowledge would cost the hospital.

Needless to say, Bell will live to see another day as the hospital’s pride and joy. As for the tremors, if they don’t go away soon, we’re looking at potential brain surgery, which would surely be the end of him.

While many things on The Resident aren’t accurately depicted, especially core concepts of medicine and responsibilities in the medical hierarchy, I find myself entertained by the narratives and the multi-dimensional characters enough to stick around.

Thoughts on this week’s episode?

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The Resident

The Resident – Identity Crisis (1×04)



The Resident Identity Crisis

It didn’t take long before Dr. Hawkins’ decision to save Luisa trickled down to the hospital on The Resident. 

They have to get the $2 million dollars from somewhere — budget cuts were inevitable.

And the first phase of budget cuts is to get rid of the overqualified, overcompensated employees and replace them with “bubbleheads.”

Admittedly, Chastain was understaffed this week and as a result, a hot mess.

Everything was blamed on the new nurse. Was it fair? Maybe. She was sitting there trying to score the perfect selfie for her social media #firstdayatthehospital post.

But she was also really stressed out about giving patients the wrong code after Dr. Feldman scolded her. I can understand not wanting to upset anyone and as a result, assigning a patient with a mere headache to the “basic” pile.

In fact, I would say she’s only about 25% to blame as several other people made their rounds, threw a backpack at the unconscious patient, knocked his phone over, and even tripped over him without taking notice.

I don’t care how busy you are, if you are a doctor in a hospital setting, it is your job to take note of your surroundings.

And why was a nurse not shadowing another nurse on her first day? That’s absurd and I really hope it doesn’t happen in real life.

Dr. Pravesh FINALLY spotted him lying unconscious and realized something was very wrong. By the time they got to him, his brain was bleeding and there was nothing more they could do for him.

“Bubblehead” nurse got a massive scolding from Dr. Hawkins. It was so bad, all the other doctors, including Dr. Feldman, assured him she’d learned her lesson so that he’d let it go. We never did see her again and if Twitter had its way, she was probably fired.

In addition to misdiagnosing him, she failed to I.D his properly. And then she took his name from the backpack, which wasn’t his to begin with thus misidentifying him as Ian. I’m not sure if the I.D’s that they have don’t have pictures on them, but I guess no one thought to assumed that this mix-up was even possible.

This kickstarted a string of very unfortunate event. Dr. Hawkins called Ian’s father who broke down upon hearing the news of his son’s death. Except when he went to identify him, he realized it wasn’t really his son.

So now, Dr. Hawkins wasn’t only trying to help the living, he was also trying to identify the John Doe so that he could inform his family.

And since one patient was so neglected, who knows what other mistakes were made during intake.

Dr. Pravesh took lead on an elderly patient with supposed gallstones. I’m trained to think that whenever someone talks about how much they love the other person or how they have big plans for the future, it’s a sure indicator that the character is going to die.

The woman’s husband asked Pravesh to inform him if the situation became dire because he wanted to propose to his 80-year-old girlfriend.

Something so trivial forced Pravesh to develop a bond with the couple and when tests revealed it was cancer, he insisted they take on the meticulous surgery. He was so dedicated, he even spent four hours on Medicare to make sure the surgery was approved.

And when the couple decided to postpone the surgery so they could tie the knot first, he offered to bring the wedding to them, quickly decorating a room with airplane-themed decorations. He even got Dr. Feldman to officiate while Dr. Hawkins secured a photographer through the hospital’s publicist. You can never have too much PR!

The surgery — performed by a refreshed, re-energized and unfailingly cocky Dr. Bell — went off without a hitch. At least someone had a better day than Dr. Hawkins.

Dr. Bell is doing well, for now, thanks to the benzo’s. The tremors have subsided, but may I remind you, symptoms include aggression and cognitive impairment so it’s only a matter of time before something goes haywire. Will Mina be there to help him when it does?

He completely discarded her because he was so overly confident about the surgery.

Mina may be arrogant but she has every right to be; she’s bloody brilliant.

And unfortunately, that’s seen as a threat in industries, especially to the older, more established doctors who are used to things being a certain way.

Protocol should never be broken, but if Mina saved a life because she made a quick choice in a hospital where the staff is scarce she definitely shouldn’t be punished for it.

Not only did she get benched by an upper doctor, Bell was so threatened and irked by her blatantly honest comment about being his secret success weapon, he upheld the decision.

Sometimes, it’s really frightening to see just how unimportant our lives actually are to doctors. If they aren’t stroking their egos or making money off of it, they simply do not care about the outcome.

Dr. Bell and Dr. Hunter even made a snarky comment about how “residents” are so gung ho, which further proves that older and more experienced doctors are too stale and out-of-touch. They prioritize money over the well-being of patients way too often.

That actually couldn’t be more true about Dr. Hunter. Nic’s storyline has been very different from everyone else’s. For starters, she’s really the only nurse on the team, but she’s very much involved with all the patients, especially Lily.

Lily is a cancer patient who frequents the hospital because of her cancer.  A few episodes ago, Nic questioned Dr. Hunter about Lily’s early release.

The moment sparked a passive aggressiveness between the two ladies and Nic hasn’t let go of it, especially because Lily arrived in the hospital again, this time weaker than ever and with an infection.

Without checking her charts, neither Nic nor Dr. Hawkins felt confident enough to move forward with treatment. She requested Lily’s charts from Dr. Hunter, who keeps them at her private practice, but they didn’t show up on purpose.

Obviously, Dr. Hunter is hiding something very critical about Lily’s prognosis.

Nic decided to take matters into her own hands and get the files in person. Off the bat, the receptionist seemed shady and disinclined to give her the charts.

As she’s waiting in the lobby, she runs into her old nursing school friend who works for Dr. Hunter, which leads her to take a peek inside the treatment room; a space with dozens of patients all hooked up to IVs.

I could barely breathe as she snapped a picture thinking she would get caught up at any minute.

Nic is fearless, especially as she zoomed in on the patient medications right as Dr. Hunter walked in!

Unable to let it go, she meets up with her nursing school friend for drinks and uses the catch-up session to grill her about what it’s like working for Dr. Hunter.

This makes her look very suspicious and the friend informs her that Dr. Hunters wants her employees to be discreet.


Nic has really dug herself into a major role, but she might be on the cusp of exposing something tremendous and corrupt.

If everyone is so shady about what’s happening at the private practice, could Dr. Hunter be giving these severely sick patients placebos in order to make a few bucks?

Unlike other medical shows, the writers are focusing on the doctors and their craft, while also exposing some flaws in our medical system.

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