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10 Best Lessons The Good Place Taught Us

THE GOOD PLACE -- "Somewhere Else" Episode 213 -- Pictured: (l-r) D'Arcy Carden as Janet, Manny Jacinto as Jianyu, Kristen Bell as Eleanor, William Jackson Harper as Chidi -- (Photo by: Colleen Hayes/NBC)

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For a show focusing on what happens after death, it sure has a lot to teach us about life.

The Good Place was bursting with lessons and teachable moments that were thrown at us in a variety of ways: Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jason’s experiences in the faux Good Place, Chidi’s philosophy lessons, Michael’s trial-and-error of understanding humanity, and several hundred Janet reboots.

Not all of the lessons were equal but they were equally as important, and we’ll forever be grateful that the show put them on our radar and helped us become better people.

Join us in reflecting on the lessons we’ve learned from the best, smartest, and most well-written show of the 2010s.

Lesson #1 – Whatever you think you know about your life, you’re probably wrong.

Time after time we thought we had The Good Place figured out, only for it to pull the rug out from under us again and again. Take a moment and you’ll notice the same thing tends to happen in our real lives. Did you schedule out your entire week? Too bad an ant colony is planning an invasion on your kitchen Wednesday. Did you finally find the best pizza in the city? Just wait until you find out it’s a drug front. Think your successful friend is trying to help you move up in the office? Sorry, he’s actually an evil demon relentlessly torturing you.

The Good Place taught us that not only are things not always what they seem, but that reality is not even close to what we think. Apples to oranges is really more like apples to your insurance card. So get ready to roll with the punches and stay on your toes – you never know what’s coming next.

Lesson #2 – Change is possible, but it’s work.

Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jason each had to change themselves if they wanted to earn a spot in the Good Place. It wasn’t easy, though. They had to continually work at improving over 800 years of time, with demons, both personal and literal, trying to drag them down. But they put in the work and time to improve, and most importantly, they didn’t leave each other behind.

They never jumped on each other from slip-ups or told the other they were worthless because they were bad people in the past. They worked hard, both individually and together, to change for the Good. Even Michael, the demon who began the series torturing them, became a force for good, and if Michael can do it, so can you.

The Good Place Lessons

NBC/The Good Place

Lesson #3 – Just because you think you’re a good person doesn’t mean you are.

Chidi and Tahani both completely believed they had earned paradise, as did our recent buddy Brent in season 4. Unfortunately for them, they were secretly in the Bad Place all along, proving definitely that just because you think you’re a good person, doesn’t mean anyone else does. Tahani and Brent both need some more self-awareness and a better understanding of what being “good” entails, but Chidi only ever had the best intentions at heart and he still constantly caused pain and dismay to those around him through his indecision. We certainly took a look in the mirror after these revelations, not to make sure we were good people, but to find out what parts of ourselves weren’t good and how we could adjust them.

Lesson #4 – We make our own meaning.

Whether it’s helping other people, partying like there is no tomorrow, or building a relationship, we make our own meaning in life. The humans of the Good Place are perpetually screwed, and yet they continue helping each other, comforting each other, laughing together, and building their bonds. When demons are coming for them, they celebrate. When they’re bound for hell, they spend time trying to save others from the same fate. When they discover soulmates aren’t real, they make them anyway. When everything seems lost in our own lives, we think of The Good Place to remind us that we can find a purpose in all that madness, and be our best selves in the process.

Lesson #5 – Almond milk is bad for the environment.

When Chidi discovers he’s in the Bad Place, he believes he knows the reason: he drank almond milk despite knowing it was bad for the environment. We never knew this, but have totally removed almond milk from our diets ever since. Chidi was initially derided for believing this was the reason he was sent to the Bad Place, but we’ve learned in the back half of the series that small, seemingly inconsequential transgressions (such as drinking almond milk) are contributing to the mass rejection of humans from the Good Place. It’s difficult to be good in a world that has become so complicated that the simple act of drinking almond milk loses you points, and we’ve been on the lookout for the unseen consequences behind our innocent actions ever since.

The Good Place Lessons

The Good Place/ NBC

Lesson #6 – Own who you are (even if it’s a Jaguars fan)

While change and betterment were at the core of The Good Place, Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jason only made progress at becoming better people when they acknowledged and accepted their flaws.

The four humans weren’t bad people, per se, they were simply products of their environment who oftentimes let their insecurities get the best of them. But those qualities also made them unique and valuable. They were just “bad enough” that they could change, but they also needed those qualities in order to change. Change requires acknowledgment of the problem, acceptance of those flaws, and the desire to become better. The humans did all of that and wore their flaws like badges of honor to improve and grow in the afterlife.

Check Out Our The Good Place Gift Guide for All Your Afterlife Swag

However, improvement never required them to become different people. They channeled their flaws and turned them into positives. Even after becoming better, those fundamentals of who they were and what made them the characters we love were still there; Eleanor’s raunchiness, Chidi’s indecisiveness, Jason’s simultaneous dopeness and dopey-ness, and Tahani’s need for approval. Their experiences came in handy many times when dealing with demons and trying to save the world ie. Eleanor’s wit and skepticism were instrumental in continuously cracking the mystery that the Good Place was really the Bad Place. It was because of who they were that they were able to make such strides in the afterlife, flaws and all. 

Lesson #7 – Empathy goes a long way 

When the series began, Michael was a demon from the Bad Place who enjoyed causing pain to the four humans, but as time went on and he grew closer to the humans, he began to learn and understand what it meant to be human. He became empathetic to their experiences, their struggles, and their desire to change.

The best example of this is when Michael agrees to help them get to the judge so they can present their case of why they deserve to be in the Good Place. When he realized they only had four badges to get through the portal, he told Eleanor that he finally solved “The Trolley Problem” and sacrificed himself by putting his friends first. He understood how hard they’ve worked to become better people and knew they deserved a shot at proving it. 

In a similar fashion, Janet, an animatronic guide, also learned to be human. After more than dozens of reboots, she becomes an all-knowing entity that not only knows all the answers to every question in the universe but also starts to understand the human experience. She begins to display human emotions like love (mostly for Jason)  she understands feelings of sadness, happiness, and everything in between, and she has the capacity to put herself in someone else’s shoes. Compassion and empathy are at the core of what makes us human. 

NBC/ The Good Place

Lesson #8 – Frozen yogurt really is delicious

Michael rebooted his neighborhood many times after it seemed to fail, but one thing that was constant was the frozen yogurt shops. Michael put it in there as a form of torture, but let’s be real, frozen yogurt is hardly torture. As Michael explained, humans excel at “taking something and ruining it a little so you can have more of it,” and it may not be ice cream, but froyo is delicious in its own right (fight me).

In fact, the invention of froyo single-handedly proves humans are geniuses and thus, froyo should be eaten and enjoyed in abundance. If there is an afterlife with an unlimited menu of flavors, that’s enough to convince us to be our best selves every single day. When Eleanor confronts Michael about all the froyo shops, he even admits it by replying, “I’ve come to really like frozen yogurt.”

Lesson # 9 – Know when it’s time to let go and move on

In the second to last episode of the series, Ted Danson’s character Michael realizes that he’s fulfilled his purpose. He went from being a demon who tried to innovate the torture experience for humans sentenced to the Bad Place, befriended them, became a better person, and built a new afterlife system with their help to save all of humanity. Initially, he tries to sabotage Vicki from taking his job but eventually accepts that she’s better at it than he is and hands over the reins, which is a key lesson.

Related: The Best Episode of The Good Place Is… “Best Self”

It’s imperative that one understands when their path has run its course, when it’s time to walk away from something that no longer serves them, or when it’s time to find something new and challenging.  Now, Michael is walking into the unknown and not knowing what waits for him on the proverbial other side, which is scary, but it’s also a necessary part of life. As humans, we are constantly reinventing ourselves and searching for our next journey. Sometimes, there’s magic with accepting and “going with the flow.”

Lesson #10 – If it’s meant to be, it’ll be

No, I’m not singing the Florida Georgia Line and Bebe Rexha song, although, it is fitting. I’m talking about trusting that whatever is meant for you will find you. Soulmates don’t exist in the afterlife, but that never stopped Eleanor and Chidi from falling in love and finding each other over and over again after almost 800 reboots. They were meant to be, it was written in the stars, call it whatever you want, but they always found a way back to each other, even if they didn’t have their memories.

At one point, the only thing Chidi was ever sure of was his love for Eleanor. When he made the sacrifice to get rebooted to save all of humanity, it’s because they both believed that they would be reunited again. It’s the very simple idea of trusting what the universe has planned for us and not trying to control your destiny. When Michael was trying to succeed with his neighborhood, he did everything in his power to prevent Chidi and Eleanor from meeting and finding each other and somehow, they always did. Okay, cue the FGL + Bebe song, baby. 

Catch up on all episodes of The Good Place now

Written by: Tommy Czerpak and Lizzy Buczak


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Editorials

21 Underrated TV Shows You Need to Watch

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22 underrated TV shows

Not every show can be the next Grey’s Anatomy or Game of Thrones, both of which have amassed a cult following of well over 8 million fans and followers on Instagram. There are so many other shows that are worth a watch, so here’s our list of 22 underrated TV shows that you need to check out.

Don’t forget to comment below which shows you agree are underrated or any titles you feel should be on this list!

1. Love (Netflix)

Produced by Judd Apatow, Love has a similar indie feel to his other work Knocked Up. Mickey and Gus, an unlikely pair, meet in a chance encounter at a convenience store. Mickey is wild and rash, while Gus is a quirky goodie two shoes. Defying the cheesy stereotypes of a romantic comedy, Love stories their surprising bond as they grow together and learn the complexities of love.

2. Shrill (Hulu)

Starring SNL comedian Aidy Bryant, Shrill stories the trials and tribulations of a plus-sized writer who uses her insecurities to grow her career. Along the way, she learns lessons in self-love and friendship all with a healthy dose of humor.

3. The Haunting of Bly Manor (Netflix)

The second mini-series in the Netflix anthology by Mike Flanigan, The Haunting of Bly Manor is set against the backdrop of a horror show. However, it’s not so much a ghost story as it is a love story. And a sad one at that. Once you get through the few jump scares, you’ll look back teary-eyed and appreciate its beautiful reimagination of memory loss.

4. Please Like Me (Hulu)

Please Like Me is an Australian comedy, coming-of-age story about twentysomething Josh. After his big gay awakening, he’s just trying to figure out life. Amid his recent move home after his mom’s attempt at suicide, moving out again, and dealing with big life changes, he doesn’t always handle things perfectly. But he faces tough events and forges his own peculiar path.

5. Dollface (Hulu)

Mixed in with a few fantastical elements, Dollface shares the truth and importance behind female friendships. After getting dumped by her boyfriend, Jules realizes she had been neglecting her friendships, so she now has to work to rebuild them. Starring some big names like Shay Mitchell and Brenda Song, this is the perfect light-hearted comedy for your nights in.

6. Behind Her Eyes (Netflix)

A single mother gets caught up in a dangerous game when she starts an affair with her boss and befriends his wife. Behind Her Eyes is a slow watch at first, but once you get to the end of the short six episodes, you’ll be shocked. This psychological thriller is vaguely reminiscent of Jordan Peel’s film Us, so get ready for some twists and turns.

7. Dark (Netflix)

You’ll need to watch this one with subtitles unless your fluency in German is up to par, but I guarantee it’s worth it. Dark is a mind-twisting puzzle about a small German town. Following the disappearance of two children, the town’s underbelly is exposed and nobody is who they think. Full of time travel, you’ll need to make sure you have a pen and paper to keep up, otherwise, you’re sure to get lost.

8. Made For Love (HBO Max)

If you like Black Mirror and the scary concept of technology, you’re sure to love HBO Max’s recent release, Made For Love. While in a toxic marriage with a tech billionaire, a woman is implanted with a chip that monitors her every move and emotion. She finally escapes and is on the run looking to regain her independence.

9. Insecure (HBO Max)

Perhaps one of the more well-known titles on this list, Insecure stars Issa Rae in this comedic yet realistic series about two friends Issa and Molly. Set in LA, the show depicts their flaws and insecurities as they make it through daily life in a city full of exclusive parties and status. It’s also an important watch for the social and racial issues it touches on.

10. Workin’ Moms (Netflix)

Think parenting is hard? It is. Workin’ Moms is a Canadian comedy all about a group of new mothers and their struggles balancing it all. Through mistakes and hiccups, they learn that while being a mom isn’t easy, it’s certainly rewarding. Even if you’re not a mom, you’re sure to get in a few good laughs.

11. Feel Good (Netflix)

In this semi-autobiographical portrayal of comedian Mae Martin’s life, Feel Good centers around the main character Mae as she grapples with her sobriety and a new girlfriend. Whether or not she’s simply replacing her drug addiction with love, she’ll have to find ways to heal and cope if she has any hopes for her relationship’s longevity.

12. Kim’s Convenience (Netflix)

The lack of Asian representation on TV is horrendous, but Kim’s Convenience is one small step closer to bridging that gap. The show follows a Korean family in Canada who owns a convenience store, and the cultural and generational gap between the immigrant parents and their two children. Although at times, it falls it into common stereotypes, the show is still fun and goofy and you’re sure to fall in love with all the characters.

13. Mindhunter (Netflix)

If you like psychology and have ever been curious about the psyche of the most infamous serial killers, Mindhunter is the show for you. Sort of like Criminal Minds, the ensemble led by Jonathan Groff, researches and studies the minds of Ted Bundy, Charles Manson, David Berkowitz, and many others to really learn what makes a murderer. In its neo-noir filming, the show is really like a mini-movie series.

14. Looking for Alaska (Hulu)

Based on the popular book by John Greene, Looking for Alaska is a sweet story about a boy named Miles, the new kid, at a boarding school. He immediately gains a loyal group of friends and falls in love with the mysterious girl Alaska. When tragedy strikes, the group looks for solace as they try and make sense of the loss they have experienced.

15. Little Fires Everywhere (Hulu)

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington are the two big leads of the adaptation of Celeste Ng’s novel of the same name, Little Fires Everywhere. Two mothers who lead very different lives seem to have a colliding fate. With varying access to resources, each mother makes a different decision that affects their family forever.

16. Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist (Hulu)

A musical show featuring the beautiful vocals of Skylar Astin, Alex Newall, and Peter Gallagher, just to name a few, Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist is about the unusual powers Zoey yields after an MRI. Zoey is suddenly in tune with the inner songs of her coworkers, family, and friends and has to learn how to use her powers to help those in need.

17. Mixed-ish (Hulu)

Following its successful predecessor black-ish, Mixed-ish is all about Rainbow Johnson’s experience growing up in a mixed-race household. Narrated by Tracee Ellis Ross, each episode takes a comedic approach to educate and highlight the specific challenges of being Black and mixed-race in America.

18. Love, Victor (Hulu)

Love, Victor is about Victor, a closeted teenage boy who is struggling with his sexuality in his traditional Latino family. Set in the same world as the innovative movie Love, Simon, Victor uses Simon’s success story to guide his own truth.

19. Dead to Me (Netflix)

When Jen’s husband dies in a tragic hit-and-run, she looks to a support group for healing. There she befriends Judy, who has a horrible secret that could wreck their friendship forever. Dead to Me is a dark comedy starring Christina Applegate who delivers an outstanding performance alongside Linda Cardellini.

20. Sweet Tooth (Netflix)

Filmed like an intricate movie, Sweet Tooth is a cross between fantasy and sci-fi. As the world is rocked by a health epidemic and a mutation that produces half-humans and half-animals, Gus is on a journey to find safety and a fresh start.

21. Firefly Lane (Netflix)

Two childhood best friends are working on navigating their friendship through adulthood in Netflix’s original series Firefly Lane. Tully and Kate have gone through the wringer together, but their friendship has always survived, until something major ends it completely.


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Manifest

Manifest: 11 Questions We Need Answered

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Manifest Review Precious Cargo and Destination Unknown Season 3 Episode 7 and Episode 8

When NBC canceled Manifest, audiences rebelled. And rightfully so.

A cancelation meant that after years and time invested in the series, we’ll never find out what happened to Flight 828, which is unacceptable. 

Manifest has one of the most dedicated and loyal fandoms. After every episode, fans took to Reddit and various forums in hopes of figuring out TV’s biggest mystery. 

And that was even more true after the Manifest Season 3 finale as it left audiences hanging with several major cliffhangers!

This tweet below sums up my feelings in the most accurate way  — apologies for the profanity. 

 

The series was mapped out to span six seasons, so naturally, ending it after season 3 leaves us with plenty of unanswered questions.

Showrunner Jeff Rake has been very active and vocal on Twitter as he encourages fans to keep the faith and remain optimistic.

He’s determined to give fans a proper ending — the ending we deserve. 

“We’re trying to find a way to conclude the series. Could take a week, a month, a year. But we’re not giving up. You deserve an end to the story. Keep the conversation alive. If it works out, it’s because of YOU,” he tweeted to Manifesters from all over the world.

Fingers-crossed that NBC greenlights a finale movie, Hulu makes an offer for additional seasons, or Netflix reconsiders their decision and renews the show (after all, it’s still trending in the #1 spot weeks after its debut on the streamer!)

Here are the most pressing questions that need to be resolved! 

1. What Happened to Flight 828

I mean… duh. The disappearance of Flight 828 and its return five years later is the overarching mystery. The plane mysteriously vanished leaving Jamaica to New York and landed five-and-a-half years later after all the passengers were presumed dead. Where did they go? Why didn’t any time pass in their reality? I can’t go on not knowing what happened to the plane or what caused it. If I don’t get an answer, it’s going to haunt me for the rest of my life. 

2018-2019 TV Season Schedule

Manifest NBC

2. What Are The Callings?

The Callings are warnings or puzzles that need to be solved, but what triggers them? Why doesn’t everyone get the Callings? What is their purpose? Are the passengers supposed to follow the Callings to become better people or find redemption?

One Redditor went to extreme lengths to figure it all out and suggested that the Callings were a result of a shared consciousness. In his Reddit essay (which is a well thought out 46 pages), he suggests: “And the visions, sounds and feelings the characters are having are a metaphysical collateral damage from sharing the same mind? The Callings are scattered impressions and manifestations from memories of the lives of everyone affected, off the responsibility of adapting to chronological order.” 

It sounds like the most reasonable explanation I’ve heard, but it’s so complex that I’d really just rather see it pan out on screen in order to get some closure. 

Manifest Emergency Exit Review

MANIFEST — “Emergency Exit” Episode 207 — Pictured: Melissa Roxburgh as Michaela — (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC)

3. Why Is Cal an Adult?

In the last few episodes of season 3, Cal tells Grace that he’ll see her again and disappears within the walls of Eureka. The Stone’s + Saanvi get a joint Calling where they see Cal back on Flight 828. He informs them that he won’t be coming back just yet. We then see him standing over Grace as she’s taking her last breaths, but this time, he’s no longer a child. Cal appears as an adult… but why? Is this Cal from the future? Is this Cal if he never disappeared on Flight 828? 

4. What Does He Have To Do?

Cal tells his dying mother that “he knows what he has to do now,” which is truly vague. What does he have to do? Does he want to go back in time and prevent the flight from ever taking off? Is that what happened to him? Can he somehow undo all the damage that’s been done? 

 

5. Did He Survive His Death Date?

Cal is presumably his normal age now (the age he would’ve been if Flight 828 never disappeared), so if he traveled back in time, it likely means that he beat the Death Date. Does that mean everyone else in the Lifeboat also survived? Or did wherever he go preserve him? Could this be a Cal from a different reality? Or is this a hallucination? So many questions.

 

6. Is Grace Alive?

The general rule on television is that if you don’t see a body, you shouldn’t write that character out. And that’s especially true for a series that centers around a group of resurrected people who were once presumed dead. What if Grace returns with her own Death Date just like the passengers, meth heads, and Zeke did? 

Also, Cal didn’t seem to be too worried about saving his mother, so maybe he knows that in the future she survives? Or that she wasn’t going to die? Or maybe he’s the one that stabbed her because he knew it had to be done! I mean, why else was he there and how did he get in? Or was he a hallucination?

7. What Does Angelina Want With Baby Eden?

For starters, Angelina stabbed (we think), stole, and baptized baby Eden. It’s unclear what she plans to do with her, but the fact that she thinks this child is her guardian angel is concerning. She’s gone to great lengths — and done some unforgivable things, which will likely sink the Life Boat — in order to be with that baby. But why? Why is Angelina drawn to the child? Why is she under the impression that she’s following God’s will?

What is Baby Eden’s purpose? I’m convinced she’s playing some kind of role in saving Earth from the apocalypse as she’s a child of the returned. 

Some have hypothesized that Eden is evil, while others believe there’s an alternate timeline where Angelina is Eden’s mother. I honestly don’t know what to believe, but I’d love a chance to find out. 

8. Where Did Captain Daly Go? And the Plane?

Captain Daly was clued into dark lightning and electrical storms way before Ben and Saanvi, which is why the government tried to get rid of him. He was so desperate to make his point that he kidnapped Fiona and flew them directly into an electrical storm. Ben didn’t believe him at first, but when they disappeared from the radar, it either meant that the rogue plane had been neutralized (though there were no signs of debris, explosion, or anything) or that maybe Daly was onto something. 

While we first expected to see Daly in 2024 (the Death Date), in the final moments of the third season, Daly reappeared in the cockpit of the salvaged 828 in Eureka. His return was likely triggered by another electrical storm. Unfortunately, he was only back for a few seconds to yell “help me” before vanishing with the whole reconstructed plane.

It’s important to note that he was once again in the cockpit and wearing his uniform, which isn’t what he had on when he vanished with Fiona. Was this a different Captain Daly… possibly the one from the original flight? 

Why did he need help? Why did the plane vanish with him? And where did he go again?

 

9. Where Was Fiona?

Most importantly… where was Fiona? Why didn’t she return with him? Did they make it to 2024 to help the passengers beat the Death Date? Is her expertise in neural psychology how they’re all getting these Callings?

When asked about where Fiona and Daly have been for the year and a half, Rake told TV Insider: “Captain Daly has been exactly where Cal was from the end of Episode 312 when he disappears to when he returns right there at the very end of the season finale. What that place is I’m gonna let Cal speak to that when we come back in Season 4. I’m going to let Ben chew on that and use that information to try to navigate where to go forward.”

 

10. Zeke or Jared?

Jared’s in love with Mic — he always has been and he always will be. He’s finally coming to terms with that, and while telling Mic that he thought “Zeke would be dead” was rude, he was simply caught up in the moment.

Zeke is an empath who has developed an intuition that allows him to feel the emotions of others, so he knows with certainty that Mic is conflicted. When he tells her that they have to “talk” in the finale, it seems like he might be taking a step back in order to allow Mic to figure out what her heart truly wants.

Mic has had a hard time letting go of the past and living in the present, and with the Death Date looming large, she’s going to have to get really honest about what she really wants out of the time she has left.

The audience also wants to know her decision. Will she stay married to Zeke? Will she return to Jared? This love triangle needs to be resolved!

Manifest Season Finale Review Mayday Part 1 and 2 Season 3 Episode 12 and 13

MANIFEST — “MAYDAY PART: 2” Episode 313 — Pictured: (l-r) J.R. Ramirez as Jared Vazquez, Melissa Roxburgh as Michaela Stone, Matt Long as Zeke Landon, Ellen Tamaki as Drea Mikami — (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC)

11. What’s With The Major’s Daughter?

There has to be more than meets the eye when it comes to Sarah. I don’t believe that her relationship with Jared was innocent. 

As Mic pointed out, he could’ve dated anyone, and yet, Sarah made her move on him almost immediately after he told her his mom was dead. She also seemed way too chill to find out the truth about her mom!

Is she going to come after Saanvi after seeing the tapes in her mother’s box? Did her mother put her up to this? I can’t be the only one who thinks that The Major is still alive and gearing up for a comeback. Maybe she’s the person above Vance that’s pulling all the strings! Or maybe she has a death date of her own!

 

There are definitely more than 11 questions within this post, so the point is, we need answers, and we’re not going to stop looking for them! 

What are your thoughts? Read all our reviews right here!


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Editorials

11 Best Board Games Inspired by TV Shows That You Need to Play

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11 Best Board Games Inspired by TV Shows That You Need to Play

We may no longer be stuck in quarantine, but one of my favorite pastimes from the pandemic has stayed with me. 

I’ll be the first to say it — adults don’t play enough games!

I forgot how fun games from my childhood like Monopoly or Life were! And they’re even better with a pop culture twist.

Some of your favorite board games have gotten a makeover from your favorite TV shows. 

Since the pandemic, I found myself collecting these TV-inspired board games. 

Here are the ones I suggest you add to your game collection:

 

Clue – Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

The classic Clue game gets a witchy twist. In the “whodunit” game, based on the Netflix series, players must figure out who is responsible for murdering Aunt Hilda! The gameboard is themed with locations including Baxter High, the Greendale Mines, and the Spellman Mortuary. The game is suitable for ages 14 and up. 

Credit: Amazon

Clue – Bob’s Burgers

If you’re not a fan of the dark arts, you can try the Bob’s Burgers-themed board game instead. In this one, you’ll try to guess who killed “Ned Buddy” while navigating iconic elements from the animated series. The game is suitable for ages 8 and up

Credit: Amazon

Monopoly – Riverdale 

Invest in houses in Riverdale as your favorite CW show character. The game features favorite Riverdale locations including Sunnyside Trailer Park, Sweetwater River, and The Pembrooke. Will you find yourself as rich as Veronica Lodge? Or will you end up the town villain in jail? The game is suitable for ages 8 and up.

Credit: Amazon

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Board Game

This game comes with a bit of nostalgia as you channel your inner slayer! Buffy, the Chosen One, needs help purging Sunnydale of all supernatural. As you roll the dice, you help get rid of monsters. The characters are fully integrated into the game, just make sure you read and understand all the rules first before beginning play! The game is suitable for ages 12 and up.

Credit: Amazon

Life – Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Life

Think you have what it takes to make it as a stand-up coming in 1950s New York? The game, inspired by the Amazon series, asks players to find their calling and choose a path or fame and fortune. But will they make it in the Big Apple or find themselves scraping by? The game is suitable for ages 14 and up.

Credit: Amazon

Jumanji The Game

Did someone hear that thudding sound? I think it’s the game calling to use. Jumanji isn’t a TV show, but I feel like everyone should have this iconic game in their arsenal. The game rules warn: “Play the game that pursues you! Do not begin unless you intend to finish.” The game is suitable for ages 8 and up.

Credit: Amazon

Catan – Game of Thrones

Transport yourself to the land of Westeros! The strategy board game wants you to become the new Lord Commander by building, defending, and rising above your brothers. Just be careful because winter is coming. The best part is that you’ll never play the same game twice as it teases limitless replayability. 

Credit: Amazon

Friends Wheel of Mayhem

Do you consider yourself a huge Friends fan? Put your skills to the test in this fast-paced game that includes wacky challenges and tough questions. “ Play like Ross and Chandler and try to not be bamboozled,” the description warns. The game is suitable for ages 12 and up.

Credit: Amazon

Monopoly – Friends

The game features some iconic Friends television moments. And you’ll get a kick out of the game pieces which include a handbag, a dinosaur, a sweater vest, a pizza, a chef’s hat, or an acoustic guitar. Spaces include Relaxi Taxi, All the Candy, Ross’ Teeth, and Holiday Armadillo! The game is suitable for ages 8 and up.

Credit: Amazon

The Walking Dead The Board Game

The board game allows you to enter the world of AMC’s The Walking Dead. Players live through a zombie apocalypse where those who have died come back to hunt down survivors, the players, who are doing their best to find refuge and defend themselves.

Credit: Amazon

Monopoly – Stranger Things

Are you ready to embark on a journey to the Upside Down? The game is inspired by the first 3 seasons of the Netflix original series. Fans try to outbid each other for properties in Hawkins, but instead of houses and hotels, you’re buying up Forts and Hideouts (like in Dungeons and Dragons!). The game is suitable for ages 14 and up.

Credit: Amazon

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