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15 Shows to Watch with mom on Mother's Day 15 Shows to Watch with mom on Mother's Day

Editorials

15 Shows to Watch With Mom on Mother’s Day

Credit: ABC/ Hallmark/ The CW

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Usually, for mother’s day, we’re treating mom to a boozy brunch or fancy dinner to show her how much we love and appreciate her, but this year, with the coronavirus pandemic taking precedence and really limiting our options on how to celebrate, it’s more important than ever to find a good show to watch with mom. 

Now, finding a good TV show to watch with mom can be pretty tricky.

There’s a plethora of shows out there to choose from. So, we’re here to help you out so you don’t spend hours surfing channels and streaming services unable to come to a conclusion. 

The show needs to be one that’s equal parts uplifting and emotional while also having a learning-curve. It needs to be one you both agree on, and if it has a strong mother-daughter relationship, well, bonus points! 

If you and your mom don’t live together, don’t worry, this is where Netflix’s new extension, Netflix Party, may come in handy. The feature allows you to host a long distance movie night or TV binge with friends and family. That way, you’re all on the same page with what you’re watching and can interact and even pause the show for everyone to offer commentary! 

While not all of the shows below are available on Netflix, plenty of them are and will make for a good mother’s day watch party.

Check out our list of recommended mother’s day shows below! Happy watching! And happy mother’s day! 

 

Jane the Virgin

Three generations come together for a family-friendly show that also brings a lot of telenovela-style drama! After all, it’s a show about a virgin who gets accidentally artificially inseminated and begins her journey to motherhood with her mom and her grandmother by her side! You and mom are bound to laugh and cry together, and sometimes both at the same time! 

 

Mom

It’s in the title, so how could we not include it? Single mom Christy is busy raising two kiddos and managing to stay sober when he mother, a recovering alcoholic, tries to make amends. Sometimes, it’s all about forgiveness. 

 

Good Girls

Good Girls is for the mom-and-daughter duo seeking a little adventure. Beth Boland is “bored” with her suburban housewife life and robs a grocery store with her bestie and sister in hopes of easing all their financial burdens. Unsurprisingly, their bold action doesn’t have the desired outcome and lands them in a whole lot of hot water. 

 

Single Parents

There’s nothing better for mother’s day than an ensemble comedy following the ups-and-downs of single parents raising children and leaning on each other for moral support and much-needed adult interaction. 
 

 

This Is Us

Before you even press play on This Is Us, you better get your tissues ready. The series, about the Pearson family, shows how powerful a familial unit can be, how much of your life is shaped by your parents, and how deep that connection is despite death, while also remaining realistic about darker demons and dysfunction. 

 

When Calls the Heart

The power of love keeps Elizabeth Thatcher in Coal Valley, a small coal-mining town, where she’s gotten a new classroom assignment. She leaves behind her high society to forge a new path in the ensemble piece. 

 

The Good Witch

Not every supernatural show including witches has to be spooky or scary. The Good Witch, about a mother and daughter who share an intuitive charm, is set in a small town and deals with love and heartache with a magical touch. 

 

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

The fiercely independent antics and journey of a comedian have you laughing until you pee your pants. Miriam’s perfect life is upended when her husband walks out on her. The only thing worse than divorce in the 50s is a woman with passion, ambition, and talent — Miriam ticks off all three. 

 

Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist

Computer coder Zoey gains the ability to hear people’s innermost thoughts and desires through song. What was once deemed a curse may be a gift that allows for a true human connection. It’s an intriguing concept that’ll leave you bopping your head and singing along. 

 

Gilmore Girls

If there’s one show every daughter and mother need to watch, it’s Gilmore Girls. Set in the quaint town of Stars Hollow, Lorelai and Rory Gilmore have a enviable bond that grows deeper and wackier with time. 

 

One Day at a Time

Penelope, a newly single Army vet is raising two children with the help of her Cuban-American family spanning three generations of strong-willed women. Through the inevitable ups-and-downs of life, she relies on her “old-school” mother for guidance and assurance. The series has also been praised for broaching important topics such as LGBTQ+, immigrations, and mental health while balancing cultural ideals and traditions. 

 

Parenthood

Family is everything, and usually, they’re far from perfect. The series chronicles the journey of four siblings who lean on each other as they tackle the everyday challenges of raising kids.

 

Beauty and the Baker

Though the series only has a few episodes under its belt, it’s a sticky sweet rom com that finds super famous Noa falling for “regular Joe” Daniel, a baker who works at his family’s Cuban bakery in Miami. As Noa and Daniel navigate their relationship, Daniel also deals with his family, who can sometimes be a bit much. 
 

 
 

Carols Second Act

Yes, CBS just cancelled this show, which is why you should absolutely watch it and give it some love! After raising children, getting a divorce, and retiring from teaching, 50-year-old Carole deserves a break. But instead of kicking up her feet and taking a much-deserved break, she pursues her dream of becoming a doctor and navigates being the oldest medical interns.

 

Once Upon a Time

When we were younger, our moms likely read us fairytales before bed. Well, those fairytales comes to life in Once Upon A Time in the cursed town of Storybrooke. And while the princesses may share the same names, their lives have been given a modern upgrade. 


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

The Resident

How Will ‘The Resident’ Write Off Nic?

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The Resident Hero Moment Review Season 4 Episode 7

The halls of Chastain will see quite a shift when The Resident returns for its fifth season.

Emily Van Camp, who plays the beloved nurse practitioner Nic Nevins, is scrubbing out after four seasons on the FOX medical drama.

While it isn’t unheard of for an actress to leave a show, the timing is unfortunate from a storytelling perspective considering Nic and Conrad Hawkins (Matt Czuchry) recently got married and welcomed a baby girl. 

In real life, Van Camp also welcomed a baby girl with husband Josh Bowman, so she obviously has to do what’s best for her and her family. We also have to assume that the struggles of working during a pandemic impacted her decision, as did her potentially expanded role in the Marvel universe.

The Resident Review Past, Present, Future Season 4 Episode 14

Credit: FOX/ The Resident

But there’s absolutely no denying that it’s a huge bummer for fans of the series, many of whom only tune in because of their attachment to the couple affectionately dubbed #CoNic.

We’ve seen the couple go through their fair share of ups and downs, but the fact that the writers chose to introduce a baby means they likely thought she was coming back for the upcoming season and had more a happier storyline in the works. 

While I have ultimate faith in the writers, it’s understandable that fans are worried about how her departure will be addressed. 

Nic is a crucial part of the show; some might argue that she’s the glue that holds everything together. 

Her exit must be handled with the utmost care and respect in order to preserve the integrity of the character. 

Since her character is a dedicated wife and mother, it’s unproductive to mess with the relationship by introducing a cheating storyline or a new job since it isn’t believable. 

We know Nic would never prioritize anything over her new family, not even a new gig. Even suggesting that as an alternative dishonors the kindhearted character Van Camp has built.

The Resident Review Season 4 Episode 1 A Wedding, A Funeral

The Resident/ FOX

So, this is where it gets concerning. 

All signs and breadcrumbs point to Nic not surviving the premiere.

There are a few indications that the writers are going to kill her off and pursue the “Conrad is a heartbroken and widowed single father to baby Gigi” storyline. 

The official season 5 poster pointed to tragedy as Conrad was seen alone in a defeated stance. His back was turned to the camera and the words “healing stars within” were written on top. 

A follow-up trailer titled “Everything Will Change” opens with an ominous montage of CoNic’s happiest moments. It then shows Conrad standing alone in his daughter’s nursery before cops come to his door to deliver some news. Since it’s never a good sign when cops show up at your house in the middle of the night, many fans to theorized that Nic was involved in a tragic accident. 

The gossip Instagram account, Deuxmoi, seemingly confirmed that theory via an anonymous tip.

“I can 10,000 percent confirm she’s leaving The Resident early in the upcoming season, but her character will die in a car accident,” a source told the account, though, these can be hit or miss so take it with a grain of salt! 

Credit: Deumoix

It’s a frustrating approach considering Nic just survived a stabbing along with pregnancy complications last season, but it’s really the only way to handle it while keeping the character intact. 

It also presents plenty growth opportunities for Conrad’s character.

Much like the fans (and probably, the writers), he never anticipated that he’d be a single father, but life threw him a curveball and now he has to step up to raise his daughter, likely with the help of his friends at Chastain. 

And while we typically see the plight of working mothers, this would offer the series a chance to dig into the hardships of balancing a thriving career in the medical field while also being a present father. 

The only other option on the table is that the accident causes Nic to go into a lengthy coma, which would also leave the door open for any potential guest appearances from Van Camp should she so choose to be involved. 

The latter would allow for the character to come back, while also allowing the writers to explain her off-screen existence with a storyline about how she gave up her career to stay at home with Gigi in the aftermath of the accident. 

However, Elkoff seemingly confirmed that Conrad will be a single father to TV Line, noting:  “He’s really good at it. He’s just going to be the best dad you can imagine.” 

He also explained that the season will pick up with a nine-month time jump, which explains why Gigi is so big in the promos already.

FOX entertainment president Michael Thorn told Deadline that it will be an emotional departure. 

The Resident Reverse Cinderella Recap

THE RESIDENT: L-R: Matt Czuchry and Emily VanCamp in the “Reverse Cinderella” episode of THE RESIDENT airing Tuesday, March 3 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2020 Fox Media LLC Cr: Guy D’Alema/FOX

“The audience is going to be surprised and emotionally engaged with how we handle Emily’s departure and the way that it affects all of the other characters,” he said. “And yes, we will be introducing some new characters as we go along, but I think it’s going to be another excellent season. Amy Holden Jones does an incredible job,” he added. 

While everyone involved with the series is staying mum on how Van Camp will be written off, they are convinced that fans won’t be disappointed by what they are calling a “potentially game-changing, development.”

“When our audience — our loyal and beloved audience — tunes in for the first episode of Season 5, by the time it’s over, they will be shocked at certain changes that are taking place at the hospital,” co-showrunner Peter Elkoff told TV Line.

In the wake of her exit (along with the exit of Shaunette Renee as Mina last season and Morris Chestnut as Barrett Cain), the series is also adding new cast members to fill the void and ensure the upcoming season has a robust ensemble. 

Miles Fowler will join the medical drama as Billie Sutton’s (Jessica Lucas) estranged son, Trevor. If you’ll recall, Billie opened up to bestie Nic about being raped at 13-years-old and giving up the baby for adoption. While she didn’t want to meet her son, he’s been reaching out hoping to get to know his birth mom. 

Regardless of how the series tackles this unexpected cast shake-up, be prepared for an emotional journey ahead.

The fifth season returns on Tuesday, September 21st at 8 pm ET/PT on Fox.

You can catch up on all of our The Resident reviews HERE

QUIZ: Which ‘The Resident’ Doctor Is Your Soulmate?


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Editorials

‘The Chair’ Review: A Humorous Commentary on the World of Academia

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The Chair Review

An entire show focused on a dilapidating university English department had the very real potential of being extremely boring and niche with its heavy ode to literature. However, Netflix’s original series The Chair, starring the fabulous Sandra Oh, is a humorous commentary on the world of academia, cancel culture, ageism, sexism, and transracial adoption.

The bulk of the humor rests on the shoulders of Ji-Yoon (Oh) and Joan (Holland Taylor) the only women in the department alongside Yaz (Nana Mensah). Ji-Yoon is the first woman department head to take the position just as enrollment is crumbling by 30%.

What’s meant to be a momentous moment in her career turns into a shit show when she’s tasked with putting out daily dumpster fires.

In the short six episodes, we’re quickly introduced to the complicated lives of Ji-Yoon and her colleague/lover Bill Dobson, one of the younger professors who’s under intense scrutiny for making an insensitive and ignorant reference to nazis.

The Chair Humorously Comments

Sandra Oh on The Chair. Photo Credit: Netflix

There’s a strong balance between personal and professional lives as the underlying tension displayed immediately between Bill and Ji-Yoon ignites a budding romance, amid the dean’s increasing pressure for Ji-Yoon to let Bill go.

Ji-Yoon’s a powerful woman who isn’t afraid to stand up against university systems that oppress women and women of color. And despite her ability to properly handle her work life, her home life seems to be teetering.

Her daughter Juju is a spitfire who is ready to speak her mind at any moment. Whether to diss her halbi, cross personal boundaries scaring off babysitters, and telling Ji-Yoon how she feels about her transracial adoption.

The real dynamic duo is Juju and Bill. As Bill’s healing from the loss of his wife and empty-nesting after sending his daughter off to college, he finds comfort in taking care of Juju while he’s on suspension.

The Chair Review

Ji-Yoon and Dobson on The Chair. Photo Credit: Netflix

Juju’s lack of connection with Ji-Yoon is saddening, as it stems from Ji-Yoon’s absence due to her tireless job. However, by the end of the season, the growth between mom and daughter is emotionally beautiful.

Yes, I shed a few tears.

The decision to use an English department as a commentary vessel is ingenious. Historically, academia is full of jaded tenured professors who are generationally out of touch. But, an English department is stereotypically overrun with crotchety old pretentious men.

Some of whom are definitely ready for retirement.

Yaz is a Black professor whose class has quickly become the most popular in the English department. With her classes yielding the most students, this causes jealousy among the other educators, putting her tenure track in harm’s way.

The Chair Review

Ji-Yoon and her daughter on The Chair. Photo Credit: Netflix

When she’s denied the distinguished lectureship and begins to feel helpless as a woman of color at Pembroke, she considers taking an offer from Yale. However, Ji-Yoon’s desperation to rebuild the department full of diverse women convinces Yaz to stay.

Yaz’s character doesn’t receive as much screentime as she deserves. Most of the attention is placed on Dobs and the rest of the professors fighting desperately to hold onto their power.

Furthering the theme of sexism, Joan’s office is displaced in the basement underneath the gym. As a professor who’s been with the university just as long as her male counterparts, she finds her situation outrageous and greatly sexist.

Yet, by the season finale, after Ji-Yoon’s been ousted as the head of the department, she strategically chooses Joan to replace her. This feels like a win for the women and especially Ji-Yoon, as her vision of change continues.

While there hasn’t been any official word about a second season, Season 1 paved the path for deeper topics to be pursued. Especially the romance between Ji-Yoon and Bill. So I can’t imagine the show won’t receive another green light.

If you’re someone who shutters at the idea of being immersed in the academic sphere even fictionally, don’t worry. The Chair is a show you can enjoy on the pure basis of humor and emotional family drama. And of course Sandra Oh!

21 Underrated TV Shows You Need to Watch


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What to Watch

5 Movies & Documentaries to Watch on the 20th Anniversary of September 11

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5 Movies & Documentaries to Watch on the 20th Anniversary of September 11

When someone asks you where you were on September 11, 2001, you can remember the day vividly. 

It doesn’t matter how old you were, your life was changed by the seismic event. 

And it’s hard to believe that 20 years have already passed. 

On Saturday, the world will experience a day of mourning on the 20th anniversary of the tragic events that took down the World Trade Centers, prematurely stole so many lives, and changed the world as we know it. 

Here are some of the most gripping movies and documentaries about 9/11 and a look at the world after:

 

Worth

Michael Keaton stars in the drama as a lawyer who aims to help the victims of the attacks and is forced to put a dollar value on the lives that were lost. 

Watch it on Netflix

 

Zero Dark Thirty

Osama bin Laden became a household name who took credit for the 9/11 attacks. The drama tells the story of a CIA agent (played by Jessica Chastain) who helps the Navy SEAL Team track him down and kill him in a nighttime raid.

Watch it on Amazon PrimeGoogle Play, or YouTube.

 

United 93

United 93 was the fourth plane hijacked by al-Qaeda in the attacks. It crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after heroic passengers took control. The drama is an account of what happened on the flight taken from the flight path, communication with air traffic control, phone calls, and interviews from loved ones of the victims. 

Watch it on Amazon PrimeHulu, or Peacock.

 

Turning Point: 9/11 and the War on Terror

The timely five-part Netflix series uses the September 11 attacks as a starting point for a larger conversation about the 20-year war in Afghanistan, which we’re seeing play out in real-time with America’s evacuation.

Watch it on Netflix

 

NYC Epicenters 9/11-> 2021½

The four-part documentary hails from director Spike Lee, who conducted over 200 interviews for the series. It features stories and first-hand accounts from eyewitnesses to the tragedy that struck the heart of NYC. 

Watch it on HBO Max.


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