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Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Recap – A Mystery Man (9×04)

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Things are a little awkward around Firehouse 51 in tonight’s newest episode of Chicago Fire. Severide is purposely avoiding his girlfriend as she prepares for the lieutenant’s test, and Sylvie is purposely avoiding Casey for…well obvious reasons. All of this, plus a mystery surrounding an assignment given to Boden is what makes up the episode of the show’s return after a 2-week break.

After learning that the only reason Kidd is going to pass the test is because he’s respected in the department, Severide is staying out of the way of his girlfriend, which she’s picking up on. It gets to the point that he invites himself on Boden’s assignment to take a look at buildings condemned by the fire department to make sure everything is in order. On the other hand, Casey gets Sylvie’s cold shoulder as the team is called out on a car accident, where a massive LED billboard car has crashed into another car. As the team works to rescue the woman trapped in her car, Casey calms the woman, named Sydney, down, and they make the safe rescue, not without a little bit of flirting beforehand.

While 51 cleans up the streets, a neighboring firetruck arrives, and one of the firemen in that crew, Chuck Rutledge, bickers with Mouch, showing that there’s a little bit of history with these two vets. This problem is revealed to be about how Rutledge was sitting in Mouch’s spot on the couch, and it escalated into a massive prank war.

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As Boden and Severide board up a building, they discuss their fathers who have passed on, and how Severide still is reminded of his father at random moments in his life, and Boden says that he’s the same about his father, who served as a police officer. Upon arriving at another house, it appears that someone has torn off the boards and is inside. Boden and Severide save an older man inside the house who fell through the stairs, but he doesn’t reveal his name leaving behind only a number: 24198. The hospital tells them that since they don’t know his name, he will be going under a John Doe register with the Chicago PD.

As Kidd prepares for the lieutenant’s test with Sylvie, Sydney, the victim in the car crash, arrives at the firehouse looking for Casey. She gives Casey her card and asks him out, and Casey agrees to see her (while through in a social distant date joke, remember this is happening in COVID!)

The prank war with Mouch and Rutledge continues as the Mouch puts a sign making fun of his old rival and his love of donuts outside Firehouse 40, and the lieutenant of that group, Greg Grainger, asks Casey if Sylvie is seeing anyone. While they look at the prank, Gianna mentions to Gallo that her kids are great pranksters, leaving Gallo nervous that he might be crushing on someone who already has kids. Rutledge then responds with a big billboard of Mouch giving donuts out at the firehouse for free.

At Molly’s, Greg, and Sylvie start flirting with drinks in hand, and a jealous Casey watches from afar. Thoughts on that later.

Kidd confronts Severide about his evasive behavior towards her, and he shrugs her off, leaving both of them just a little bit uncomfortable.

Back at the house where 24198 was, Severide finds a hat with the number written on it, which is shown to be a badge number. After an investigation, Henry Sidwell is revealed to be the mystery man, who has been suffering from dementia and wandered off to the house, since he and his wife used to live there. An emotional Boden reunites the two and has him thinking about his own life and how time can go by quickly.

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Gallo and Mouch dump a huge truck of donuts on the steps of Firehouse 40, but a call from a construction site prevents them from gloating. The construction site was getting demolished when the charges went off too early, and Gianna finds herself taking care of a victim when another charge goes off. Thankfully, Gallo sprints like a madman over to her before the charge goes off and covers her and the victim. They give each other the look of “you just saved me, so I’m gonna kiss you,” but no kiss comes since there’s work to do. Gallo tries to ask Gianna out on a date to the playground and to bring her kid, but she said she was referencing a kid at a daycare that her parents run, she just calls them “my kids.” As the laughter subsides from that awkward moment, Rutledge drops a literal helicopter full of donuts on top of Firehouse 51, and Mouch waves a white flag to surrender. These firefighters sure have a lot of time on their hands…

As the episode ends, as usual at Molly’s, Boden advises Severide about facing troubles at home rather than avoiding them, because avoiding issues make everything worse. Boden then receives an urgent phone call and ducks out, and Casey sits at the other end of the bar, about to call up Sydney, opening the door to a new romance. Severide discovers that Kidd left his apartment because of the strain in their relationship.

Boden finds Henry Sidwell and tells him he can’t go back to that boarded-up house, but to hold onto the memories of the house like he has the memories of his father, and the episode ends with Henry giving Boden his police hat as a reminder of the memories.

Here’s where I’m at when it comes to some of the subplots of Fire: I like the fun little prank war of Mouch and his old co-worker. I’m okay with the Severide and Kidd subplot. While Severide isn’t being the best boyfriend in the world, his intentions are there, I just wish he would tell her that he’s avoiding her to make her want to work harder. It’s the Casey and Sylvie subplot line that I can’t really get behind. They had their flirtation, but Sylvie shut it down, yet continues to be jealous of him. I’m sure the show is going to gear around to them getting together eventually, I just think that the characterization of the two’s relationship is something that needs to the re-examined.

The main plotline of the episode was great: it’s rare we see Boden so emotionally vulnerable behind that stoic nature he has, so it was wonderful to see an episode where we get to see what emotion hides behind that big mustache of his. However, besides the Mouch plot, there was something left to be desired. The show is going to continue the Severide/Kidd, and Sylvie/Casey plotlines probably through the rest of the season, so I hope they can come to a resolution soon because it’s getting a little clunky for a show that has been going for nine seasons.

What did you think of the newest episode of the NBC hit? Leave a comment below.


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Bill Wetherbee is a recent graduate of Wagner College with a degree in Theater! Currently based in New York City, he loves to learn everything about the TV/film industry, watching everything that's trendy, and analyzing his favorite reality shows, Survivor and Big Brother! Twitter/Instagram: bill__wetherbee

Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Review: What Happened at Whiskey Point? (10×08)

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Chicago Fire What Happened at Whiskey Point Review

Herrmann and Mouch played detective, as the tension between Gallo and new firehouse lieutenant Pelham escalated to new highs in tonight’s newest episode. With Pelham taking Casey’s spot, and Boden taking a liking to him, his job security is almost solidified. But his mysterious past of constantly moving firehouses made Herrmann and Mouch suspicious. What happened in this guy’s past that made him always jump around? And will he bring that past to Firehouse 51?

Somehow, Mouch got a confidential file on Pelham, and made sure to hand it to Boden, who found out in the file that Pelham was given the longest suspension in Fire Department history. When Boden asked what it was, Pelham was cryptic and said that it’s something he never wants to discuss. Kind of strange that he wouldn’t give those details to a commanding officer. And Boden just let it go, saying the episode title “What happened at Whiskey Point?”

Mouch discovered a rumor that Pelham punched a commanding officer in the face on a call at a warehouse fire at Whiskey Point, and a few weeks later, that officer retired out of the blue. Boden visited the captain, Stafford and asked about the incident. Pelham accused Stafford of stealing jewelry at the case. Stafford admitted he did steal the jewelry, and Pelham said he would keep his mouth shut if he returned them, and retired, and that Pelham is on the floater cycle because he hit a superior. Pelham took the fall for Stafford because Stafford was having a horrible crisis with his family leaving him, and was going off the rails.

Gallo once again disobeyed a direct order on a call to a house where the fire alarm was malfunctioning and the residents not home. Gallo found a way through an open window, much to the anger of Pelham. The two got into a heavy yelling match about how Gallo is apparently insubordinate, and Gallo retaliating saying he will be on 51 longer than Pelham.

A house fire tested their professional relationship like no other, as Pelham and Gallo worked together to save a little girl trapped in the blaze. The two saved the girl, and got out of the house with ease, upsetting Gallo as his family died in a house fire when he was a kid. This experience brought the two together, and Gallo apologized and promised he will be behave better.

Side plot A of the week: Sylvie and Ritter begging Violet to tell Gallo how she feels about him. It’s clear that she likes him, and has been insanely jealous of his flirtation with their mini-brewery investor Kara. The romantic tension between them has always been there, since they’ve been on again, off again. This came to a head when the stress of work and her personal life caused Violet’s appendix to burst while being reprimanded by paramedic Chief Hawkins. On the way there, a delirious Violet was ranting about her personal life, and made Hawkins believe that she was flirting with him.

At the hospital with Violet, Gallo said that he has a tendency to be dark and distant to the people he loves, because when he feels like those people always leave him.

Side plot B of the week: Herrmann started moving his things into Casey’s old office. Severide doesn’t like the idea of Herrmann having this office, since it usually goes to the truck lieutenant, which is Pelham. Not only that, but Herrmann tried to give himself an office in season 8, and nearly burned the place to the ground in the process. It was a back and forth of Herrmann annoying Severide with loud music, hammering in the walls. Herrmann tried to buddy up to Severide, making him burst with rage to Herrmann. Severide made up with him by bringing some cigars to his house.

Side plot C of the week revolved around Cruz befriending a future single mom on a call after rescuing her, and his introspective look at how there are different kinds of people raising kids in different environments. While he was freaking out over expensive preschools, this woman, Stacy, had to cut back on her finances and move around jobs because she’s a struggling single parent. Stacy knitted Cruz’s baby a little fireman’s hat, and gave him advice that her mom gave her about always sitting the positives of parenting.

The end of the episode had Severide drop a bomb that Stella is not sure when Stella will come back, since Girls on Fire is doing so well in Boston, and he’s nervous that they will be distant whenever she gets back.

Could this possibly lead to Stella and Severide breaking up, or possibly either of them leaving the show? It seems that that may be a big deal when the show returns for its fall finale on December 8.

As I have said a couple of times already, the show seems to really be setting up for Gallo to take some form of leading man role. So much of the last several episodes have revolved around him in some capacity. With Casey gone, and now some possibility that Severide could be headed out soon, they’re gonna need a new young looking firefighter to be the face of the show.

Cruz’s time today was great. I think they have been using this character as a great moral ground for the show, since he has such a genuine heart for almost everyone he meets.

Pelham may become a more recurring role as time progresses too. Brett Dalton is doing a great job as this struggling lieutenant trying to fight his way back into the firefighting command.

What did you think of tonight’s episode? Leave a comment below!


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Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Review: Whom Shall I Fear? (10×07)

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Chicago Fire Whom Shall I Fear Review

Kelly Severide’s arson case continued on tonight’s brand new episode, and a brand new lieutenant takes charge at Firehouse 51.

With golden boy Casey gone, a new lieutenant was assigned to the Firehouse. This lieutenant, Jason Pelham (played by Agents of SHIELD‘s Brett Dalton), obviously works a lot different than Casey, because there still needs to be some drama at the end of the day. This was proven to be effective when Gallo and Pelham had a small standoff on a call already causing some tension with the change in leadership.

Boden is using Pelham to see if he would be a good fit to be the new permanent lieutenant, since Kidd is still gone. By the way, Stella has been in Boston for several weeks, which makes me wonder if she wasn’t cleared during filming of these episodes because of the pandemic.

Pelham looked into what made Casey so great, and tried to make amends with Gallo for the rest of the entire episode. It proved to be rather unsuccessful, because even Pelham showed a little bit of his superiority complex by enforcing his own rules to Gallo.

Boden told Mouch and Herrmann that Pelham has been floating between several firehouses over the last few years. While this seemed normal to Mouch, it raised suspicion in Herrmann, who thinks that there may be something deeper as to why Pelham would be floating around firehouses, rather than having one assignment at one house.

Severide continued his search for the arsonist responsible for the church fire, and together with Seager, investigated Sister Montclaire once again, and she revealed that Father Anthony had an accusation against him from a kid, but nothing came of the lawsuit. Their biggest lead, Father Anthony himself, died during complications in the hospital, which destroyed any possible leads to the arsonist.

While looking through possible patterns from the arsonist, Severide found a connection through a dumpster fire that was set two months prior to the blaze right by a Catholic church. At that church, the priest there said that some of the altar boys found defaced missals where someone drew pictures and wrote in them. In the missals, they noticed the same picture on top of the verse “the Lord is my light and my salvation.” This verse was on a picture that Sister Montclaire had on her wall, who said that the former groundskeeper, Muller gave it to her.

In the groundskeeper’s room, they found it completely cleaned out, but found a traces of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. At his house, they found the place covered wall to wall with plans, pictures, and writings about the church fires.

Muller sent a false alarm to a church to clear everyone out, only to set off a car bomb to hurt people Thankfully, everyone at 51 was already there, and managed to clear everyone out, but Muller killed himself in the blast. Boden saved a little girl before the explosion, and Pelham was right behind him to throw his coat over him, inspiring Boden to making him the new lieutenant for another month.

The only other crazy thing in the episode was showing that Sylvie was preparing to go see Casey in Oregon, but before she could go, he told her not to, since he’s doing a wildfire training course. The end of the Casey-Sylvie relationship is beginning, and Casey isn’t even around to see it all end.

Gallo is emerging as a big character in the growth of Chicago Fire. Casey was making him his protege right as he was leaving, and his standoff with Pelham was a big one in his future development. This, coupled with his mini-brewery business, is perfect headway to get this character growing to leading man status.

Those tensions with Pelham are going to stem into next week, as they teased another showdown between the two, where Gallo disobeys a direct order. And with the mystery of who Pelham is spanning over the next few weeks, it’ll be interesting to see what sorts of dominoes could fall, and possibly affect the firehouse as a whole.

What do you think of the new lieutenant? Leave a comment below!


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Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Review: Dead Zone (10×06)

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Chicago Fire Dead Zone Review

Matthew Casey is gone, and a new era of Chicago Fire begins with tonight’s episode. Casey has gone to Oregon to take care of two kids he wants to be there for, but Firehouse 51 continues to run as normal.

Teamwork made the dream work for the episode, as multiple firehouses were dispatched to one location, but they both worked together to save a man who was struck in the chest by a basketball rim.

The confusion was the biggest part of tonight’s episode. Hackers got into the CFD’s central computer system, and shut down all communications, meaning everything needs to be done by hand. Mouch and Herrmann had the most experience in doing this before, so they took the lead on this case. The entirety of Firehouse 51 was assigned to work as the sole dispatch for the whole city of Chicago. They set up the whole firehouse with phones, maps, notepads and whiteboards to organize where people are, what their emergency is, and who to dispatch to the location.

It was incredibly stressful to see Chicago’s finest not be able to help anyone, when they know that they could. They took the whole firehouse out of commission while the trouble was sorted out. However, a man who’s garage was on fire a few blocks away, inspired Boden to send Firehouse 51 to the garage, despite being out of commission.

Severide teamed up with Lieutenant Sieger to take down the arsonist that set fire to the church from last week. After investigating the scene it was clear that there was definitely arson involved. The pastor told Severide that Sister Montclaire was the only person who was not anywhere near the church when the fire occurred.

After talking with her, she gave them the name of a former student, Mosiah Adler who was expelled after lighting someone’s hair on fire. After talking with him, he said that he didn’t do it, and that the incident was an accident.

Severide went to the Archdiocese to ask about Father Anthony, and they were informed that he’s an old school pastor, and he stalled on handing in his parish papers in that had funding details on them, and those papers were burned in the fire. Headquarters knows there’s a lot of convoluted information regarding the search, because its the word of a priest, or a delinquent who was expelled. When going to the Father Anthony’s place of residence, Severide found the priest tied up with a fire underneath him, with the arsonist sprinting out of the firehouse.

Severide called the firehouse and they worked to send backup as quickly as they could, considering they could only work with what they were given. The team was able to take the priest to the hospital, where he was placed in a medically induced coma, leaving the mystery of the arsonist still wide open.

The hackers were taken care of, and the 911 operators were back online by the end of the episode.

We got a vocal cameo from Matt Casey, as he called Sylvie wanting to set up a call schedule so they can make their long distance relationship work.

I would’ve liked this 911 dispatch storyline to last more than one episode. I think it was intriguing for the firehouse to adapt to a new situation such as this, despite how little they could really do to physically help people.

It’s clear to me that Severide is going to take the lead from here on out now that Casey is gone. At least this church arsonist is going to continue for at least a third week, as this was teased at the end of the episode. I’ll be intrigued to see how long this case goes, especially because they’re using Kevin Atwater from Chicago PD to help in the investigation.

What did you think of tonight’s first episode without Matt Casey? Leave a comment below!


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