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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – Death Do Us Part (4×09)

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Till death do us… oh man, Will made a stupid again.

They were not lying with the title of this episode.

A title that ominous, especially in regards to Will and Natalie, obviously means they didn’t get the happily ever after they were expecting on their wedding day.

As always, Will is to blame.

While he was getting fitted for his suit, the three stooges, better known as Burke’s idiot sons, requested a house call and despite getting all the bad vibes, agreed to go through with it.

The minute Will arrived at the office on the river, I knew it wasn’t going to end well for him.

For starters, who would ever find him here? This is the perfect place to remain incognito and dump dead bodies. Come on, Will.

Tommy Burke almost immediately confronted Will about the bug that they found planted in the house, and it was all downhill from there.

This is what you get for that “doctor-patient” responsibility being more important than your own safety.

Despite Will’s less than stellar track record, it’s still heartbreaking to watch him miss his wedding day because the reason he’s in this mess in the first place was so he could have the perfect venue for Natalie.

When Ray collapses and the three stooges refuse to take their dying dad to a hospital, Will is forced to perform an emergency surgery to relieve the brain pressure all while having a gun pointed at his head.

Talk about pressure!

Seeing Will drill into a skull using construction tools is pretty gnarly, but you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do to survive right?

Regardless, if he saved Ray or if he made the wrong move and accidentally killed him, he was a dead man walking.

When the brothers finally agreed to take Ray to a hospital following Will’s successful impromptu surgery, the only thank you he got was a gun pointed at his head.

Thankfully, Jay figured out something was wrong and came to Will’s rescue just as he was about to get his brains blown out.

Unfortunately, Jay getting the information to save his brother meant that Connor Rhodes had to hit pause on a patient’s risky surgery to wake him from the anesthesia in time to answer questions about the Burke brothers.

Rhodes obviously didn’t feel comfortable doing any of it and for good reason — his patient died shortly after. I’d feel bad, but since the guy was messed up with the Burke brothers, he likely wasn’t a good guy.

When Will failed to show up for the wedding, Natalie thought what any other bride would think — he stood her up.

She kept bringing up Will’s odd behavior leading up to the wedding, which made me question why she even went through with it and ignored all the red flags.

Maggie was her saving grace, keeping her calm until Will finally did arrive. However, in addition to getting blood all over her crisp, white dress, he also told her he was going into protective custody and no wedding would be happening that evening.

Sadly, when the FBI approaches you to help them bust a dangerous gang in Chicago, they don’t ever tell you about the consequences of getting caught up. Granted, Will should be thankful to be alive, however, this also isn’t how he imagined his wedding night would go down.

And it was another cheap attempt at causing friction between Natalie and Will. Why can’t the writers let them be happy?

On the other hand, Will did bring it upon himself for getting involved with Ray Burke in the first place and accepting bribes in exchange for gifts. He has no one to blame but himself.

My only problem with how the FBI handled everything after Will’s rescue is that if the Burke’s really were as dangerous as the FBI claims they are, why the hell didn’t they take Natalie and her son Owen into protective custody as well?

If Tommy and his brothers come for revenge and can’t dig their stoogey claws into Will, the next logical step is going after his family.

And since he was supposed to have his wedding at Burke’s hall, they obviously know who his fiancee is.

The Halsteads just put a major target on Natalie’s back and didn’t even offer any explanation. How careless!

Meanwhile, the writers still want us to care about Ethan and April for some reason.

They didn’t work out as a couple when they were together, but suddenly, we’re supposed to feel bad that he’s moving on.

Their case — a woman who gave birth to a baby that had less than 24-hours to live — did bring them together slightly, but it’s safe to say that they didn’t work out for a reason.

After the young parents deserted the baby, April stayed behind to be there for the baby’s final moments scoffing at the rest of the staff and Ethan, who was going to the Manning-Halstead wedding with his ex-girlfriend.

These two really need to figure out what it is that they want.

Dr. Charles’ patient emphasized the theme of the night by showing us that love is complicated and sometimes, despite our best intentions, life gets in the way of two people being together.

The patient, Amber Young, came into the hospital after stabbing an intruder in her home. Or, more specifically, a man she assumed was an intruder.

Because of a tumor and drugs that were helping with the tumor, Amber was having difficulties recognizing people so, in actuality, she stabbed her husband.

Charles tried to wean her off the pills and give her something else, but even though that cleared up the hazy memory, she had adverse reactions.

In the end, there was no way to help Amber live with the tumor and recognize her husband. It was heartbreaking.

Thoughts on the winter finale of Chicago Med? Will Natalie finally get some answers? Is Will safe with the FBI?

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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – In the Valley of the Shadows (5×03)

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Chicago Med In the Valley of the Shadows Review

Chicago Med continues its triumphant 5th season return with a third stellar episode in a row.

Doctors Orders – Dr. Charles remains pretty neutral when it comes to diagnosis patients. He never puts his personal beliefs into his clinical analysis and remains objective, yet he cannot seem to follow that same advice when it comes to his family. After Caroline takes a tumble and breaks her wrist, Dr. Charles urges her not to go through with surgery since it isn’t in her best interest. He’s echoing the sentiments of her oncologist since her immune system’s been compromised by the chemo, but Caroline is stubborn.

She doesn’t want her husband the doctor, she wants her husband the understanding human.  A patient summed up Dr. Charles’ problem in the best possible way: he gives them an option to decide about treatment and then shames them for their decision.

Not that Charles was wrong in his analysis. Caroline was being stubborn and was rushing into something without considering her needs above her wants. But it’s easy for a cancer patient whose life has been turned upsidedown to want some control. That’s the part Charles was missing when speaking to his wife.

 

Own Up to Your Mistakes – Natalie put a patient’s life in danger when she had what most of us would call a brain fart and ordered a nurse to push the wrong drugs. We know Natalie is more than capable, but many doctors at Med have this ego issue where they won’t admit they’re struggling because it’s viewed as weaker or less than. They could sit there and dish out solid advice to every single patient, yet fail to listen to their own. It’s frustrating.

Natalie’s flub was an honest mistake, but it was one she could have paid for dearly. Will Halstead blew everything out of proportion, but he was right when he suggested taking it easy. His motives for wanting Natalie to look into a beta trail to help with her memory loss does stem from his selfishness, but it also comes from a place of concern and protection.

Will knows that Natalie didn’t come to tell him she was engaged and the sooner she remembers, the quicker they can get rid of Phillip, who honestly is growing increasingly creepy. The way he was hanging around the hospital with the kiddos gives me those Dear John vibes. Does he have any hobbies or is he leeching off of Natalie? I couldn’t shake this concerned feeling every time he was around Owen.

Will is also trying to protect Natalie from getting in trouble with the board. If she’s not properly healed and messes up with a patient, even in the slightest, it could cause some real issues for him. It’s better safe than sorry. Arguably, there was a better way for Halstead to approach the situation, but Natalie has been known to be stubborn.

 

What is Dr. Marcel’s Deal – Dr. Marcel is a bit of an enigma. He seems like a doctor who knows what he’s doing, but he’s been in two of the three episodes this season and the only thing that has been known is that he has an ego the size of China.

Marcel’s approach to dealing with a woman who rushed her bloody, non-breathing baby to the ER had every right to make April nervous and suspicious. April is intuitive and highly trained — she knew immediately that there was something shady about the “mother.” And yet every time, Marcel allowed the mother to refuse treatment and undermined April.

That is until April found out that Marcel gave the new mother Ativan so she would knock out and so he could illegal pull a blood sample to figure out if she had just given blood.

Maybe he isn’t such a monster after all?

The storyline with the stolen baby was disturbing only because it felt torn from the headlines. Very recently, a tragic story about a mother and her daughter killing a young mother and cutting the baby out of her womb disgusted the city of Chicago.

The worst part is that the “fake mother” was so distraught over the loss of her son, she thought what she was doing was justified.

 

You Need Help – Another person in the OR who doesn’t admit to needing help is Maggie. The chemo is definitely impacting her and her ability to do the job yet she refused to train a new employee to replace her.

Understandably, feeling like your replaceable especially because of a situation out of your control must suck, but Maggie’s denial was careless. She put her fellow doctors, her patients, and herself in danger. What if she fainted at the operating table and fell on top of a patient?

The job has never been easy even when Maggie’s health was at its best. There’s no need for her to do it all alone or act tough now.

Maggie’s decision to pass the torch to April was a better-suited solution and hopefully, this means she’ll finally confide in her best friend about what’s going on.

 

Ethically Struggling – Dr. Choi cannot seem to wrap his head around what it means to honor a patient’s last wishes.

While doctors are meant to save their patients at all costs, if someone comes in with a terminally ill disease, they have to honor the request and the DNR in place. Time and time again, Dr. Choi has challenged patients about what they want to do and how they want to do it, and it’s just getting tiring.

His patient was coherent and able to make his own decisions. If he thought cryonics was worth the risk then so be it.

Unless you’re dealing with a terminal illness, there’s absolutely no reason why you should preach about what’s right and what’s wrong to someone. These people are essentially staring down the barrel of a gun just waiting for it to fire.

And Dr. Charles was right — the patient didn’t see this solution as suicide, he saw it as the complete opposite.

 

What did you think of the episode? Are you digging Chicago Med this season?

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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – We’re Lost in the Dark (5×02)

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Chicago Med We're Lost in the Dark Review

Chicago Med continues to surprise and excel in its fifth season.

After a steller, albeit slightly soap opera-ish, premiere, the doctors at Gaffney brought life to a predictable and common trope.

The power outage caused by a storm pushed the doctors to their limits, and we almost got through the hour without any of their personal lives hijacking the storyline.

Almost being the keyword.

A focus on medical storylines always delivers great results and forces the ED to work together.

But things start to fall apart when the series tries to draw connections between the textbook material and what’s happening to the doctors in their personal lives.

We saw the same back-and-forth with Natalie and Will as we had in previous seasons. The addition of the brain injury causing memory loss trope paired with the possibility of Phillip being a complete nutjob was promising even if it was a bit much.

I mean, they basically sounded the alarm on Phillip in the Chicago Med season 5 premiere.

But we didn’t see any of that.

Nor did we get to see how Natalie’s injury was affecting her life outside of the romance aspect.

The whole arc was created with the sole purpose of creating more unnecessary drama between Will and Natalie.

While Natalie still had memory loss — as in she didn’t remember the proposal that never happened — there wasn’t any mention of her relationship with Phillip being off.

Will approached Natalie to welcome her back and things seemed fine between them. When Natalie told Maggie that she didn’t have feelings for Phillip anymore, a possible side-effect of her brain injuries, it seemed like a Will and Natalie reconciliation was on the horizon.

And then, like clockwork, Will pushed too far, got too invested in Natalie’s relationship, and pushed her away.

She got defensive of her relationship and without even wanting to, Will pushed her back into Phillip’s arms.

There’s no universe in which Natalie and Will’s storyline isn’t dysfunctional.

No matter how many times they try it always plays out the exact same way.

Phillip might be crazy but Will’s clinging to something he should have let go of a while ago.

On her first day back, Natalie was put under immense pressure when she was trapped in an elevator with a gunshot patient in a severe state.

She pulled through with the help of Chicago Fire’s Matt Casey, but it wasn’t without a few hiccups and headaches.

Natalie may seem fine but she’s been through a traumatic event herself — maybe she isn’t exactly ready for a full comeback.

Another person who should probably take it easy is Maggie.

If there’s anything we take away from the episode is that Maggie won’t be able to keep her chemo under wraps for too long.

Maggie doesn’t lean on people for help — she likes to be the one that people come to.

But asking for help is a necessary quality and one that she needs to embrace if she wants to beat this.

No one would look down on her. Yes, they might stop her from doing her job, but it’s best for her to take it easy.

If it had been just any other day, she could have gotten away with working her full shift.

Unfortunately, it was a long, high-stress day and the combination of chemo, doing too much, and the extreme heat took its toll on Maggie.

At the very least, she should tell her best friends April and Natalie.

They deserve to know and be there for her.

Noah’s back in the ED. His absence for the last half of the season wasn’t addressed, and he was thrown back right into the mix presenting the episode with somewhat of an ethical dilemma.

Noah didn’t agree with Dr. Marcel’s aggressive approach to selling bypass surgery to a patient.

It’s unclear if the patient’s situation was as dire as Dr. Marcel made it seem, but nevertheless, the patient agreed.

Noah seemed to have his hesitations even more so when the power went out.

If Marcel hadn’t been so persuasive, the patient wouldn’t have been in this situation.

But nothing else was explored in terms of ethics.

Noah later joined in on the surgery offering an extra hand and impressing Marcel who said he has “good hands.”

There’s no denying the whole reason for this scene was for Noah to get inspired and ditch his vision of a clinic to pursue a specialization.

While Noah stepped up to the plate during a time of crisis, poor Steve didn’t fair as well.

The medical student was thrown into the hubbub of the power outage when Dr. Choi learned he wanted to be an ED doctor and neede an extra hand.

Steve’s experience was just as traumatic as the patient’s life-or-death situation.

Seeing him overwhelmed and shocked by the situation unfolding in front of him was understandable — this was his first day!

He wasn’t ready to go into war-mode. Even experienced doctors were in panic mode.

So it was no surprise that by the end, Steve said that he was quitting despite his love for medicine.

To be fair, not every day is this intense, but the job isn’t for the faint of heart. If your heart isn’t in it, it’s probably best to find a different career path.

Dr. Choi wondered if he was too hard on the guy, but in reality, there was no time to ease him into a situation.

Despite walking him through everything, Dr. Choi treated him like a doctor and threw him in right into the action.

Steve wasn’t ready.

If that’s where this plot finished it would have been solid, but instead, the writers tried to tie it back to April and Ethan’s desire to have children.

Dr. Choi didn’t hold Steve’s hand or anticipate his needs (he was a little preoccupied) so that somehow meant that April would make a good mom cause she at least offered him a granola bar and water.

It’s a stretch to reiterate that the writers want these two to be parents at all costs.

And then there was Halstead’s patients, three girls who were suffering from seizures.

The “infection” started with one, spread to the second girl and then finally the third.

But seeing Dr. Charles lurk in the background with his brow furrowed meant that he was about to make a psychiatric breakthrough.

He didn’t believe Halstead’s theory that all these girls were infected.

They may have been exhibiting seizures and symptoms, but they were also attempting to study for AP Calculus while shaking and throwing up.

Turns out, Dr. Charles was right — the girls weren’t infected, they were simply under an immense amount of stress and were exhibiting a follower’s syndrome, which sounds like something we’d diagnose people on social media with.

The pressure to succeed will do that to you.

The moment Dr. Charles had a psychiatric theory and asked to have the girls in one room, I figured it would be something involving a placebo drug (tic tacs!) and anxiety.

What did you think of the episode?

Are you tired of Will and Natalie’s same old love story?

Do you think Maggie should come clean?

Have you missed Dr. Charles’ psychiatric diagnoses?

Should Dr. Choi and April cool it or get pregnant already?

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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season 5 Premiere – Never Going Back to Normal (5×01)

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Chicago-Med-Premiere-Review

All of Chicago Med is in complete disarray when season 5 premieres.

Poor Sharon Goodwin wasn’t lying when she was having a day.

The medical drama picked up right after the accident that knocked Dr. Manning unconscious while she was sitting in Will Halstead’s car, but it gave every character enough time to shine.

We said goodbye to one major character and dealt with the gruesome death of another.

Here are the biggest takeaways from Chicago Med “Never Going Back to Normal.”

1. Connor & Ava – I’m starting with these two characters because boy, things went South between them rather quickly. After Connor was investigated by Atwater for his father’s death, he aggressively accused Ava of killing his father. She denied it, and the optics weren’t in his favor when Dr. Latham walked in on Connor grabbing her by the wrist.

Someone in the hospital poisoned Connor’s father with an overdose of insulin, an untraceable compound, which made it hard to pinpoint a suspect. But Dr. Latham, wanting to quell any hostility between his two doctors, found that it was laced with chromium, which is traceable. The minute Ava realized she was going to get caught, she panicked. She begged Connor to give her one hour so she could get a head start to O’Hare and she’d be out of his life for good. At this point, she’d basically admitted to sleeping with Conrad’s father, causing the rift between them, and every other crazed and delusional thing he’d suspected her for.

Related: Chicago Med – The Space Between Us (4×17)

Connor refused to let her get away with it, and as she called him an ungrateful prick, she slit her carotid artery and began bleeding out. Now, if you’re like me and thought that people would accuse Connor of murder, well, they probably would have but the writers were running out of time to get rid of these two characters who had run their course. Connor and Dr. Latham joined forces to operate but unfortunately, Ava passed away on the table. Connor banged his fist on the table in anger, but other than that, he didn’t seem too phased by all that just transpired with his co-worker/former lover. He got his closure, told Dr. Latham and Sharon Goodwin that he was leaving Med, and that was that.

Personally, Ava’s character was tragically ruined over the course of these few seasons. She started out as such a competitive spitfire that wasn’t privy to Connor’s charms and somehow ended up with a horror movie equivalent obsession with him that the writers said was a personality disorder. It never worked for me and I thought they ruined something that could have been a solid relationship on the series.

Thanks for all the good times, Dr. Rhodes. And RIP Ava, you batshit but brilliant doctor.

2. Natalie and Will – Natalie and Will’s storyline is playing out like some midday soap opera, but I’m not complaining. After the crash, Natalie is in pretty bad shape. Will wants to remain by her side at all times, but they force him to get checked out as he too was involved in the crash. While Will is away, Phillip swoops into Natalie’s room and tells the doctor that he’s Natalie’s fiancee, which we know is a lie because if he was telling the truth, he wouldn’t have snuck into her room to slip on an engagement ring.

There’s always been something shady about Phillip, which, much like with Ava, doesn’t feel organic. I’m having trouble buying into a narrative that a man who lost his wife and ended up a single dad would have some kind of agenda towards the doctor he fell in love with. But here we are, and Phillip is acting all shady and lying to the doctors. Maybe he’s scared of raising a child alone and thinks it’s better to just never let Natalie go? I don’t know, I can’t figure this one out.

Will comes to check up on Natalie and the two get into a loud verbal altercation in which Phillip tells him that Natalie is no longer his business. Why does Phillip all of a sudden have something against Will? Is it jealousy?

Will is crushed, and rightfully so. He was left wondering why Natalie came to his car before the accident and apologized. We know she was probably there to tell Will that she’s in love with him, but now it seems like she was there to tell him about her engagement.

Natalie regains consciousness by the end of the episode, and though she remembers people, she has no recollection of what happened. She doesn’t remember talking to Will’s ex-girlfriend who convinced her that he’s still in love with her and she doesn’t remember being in Will’s car or the accident. All she knows is that she’s recovering and that Phillip is now her fiancee.

This is dangerous because now, Phillip can say anything he wants and she won’t know if he’s lying or telling the truth. Hopefully, she remembers soon enough and realizes that she rejected him because of her feelings for Will.

Also, where the hell is Natalie’s son, Owen?

3. April & Ethan –  The on-again couple successfully spares a young boy from brain surgery when they realize they mistook a tumor for an enlarged organ as a result of hypothyroidism. Look, better to catch it late than never. The young boy’s parents reveal that he was a miracle child because doctors told her she couldn’t get pregnant.

It essentially parallels April & Ethan’s storyline as they both assumed she was pregnant and were bummed to find out that wasn’t the case. After treating the boy they realized they wouldn’t mind having a child together, but as you remember, April had some pregnancy complications in earlier seasons with ex-boyfriend, Tate. Do you think we’ll get an April & Ethan baby this season?

4. Maggie – The mother hen and glue that holds the ED together found out that she has breast cancer at the end of season 4. Sharon made sure that she went to get her biopsy and the results weren’t uplifting: it was metastatic and she might need to get a mastectomy. She begs Sharon not to tell anyone at work and says she’ll get treated at a neighboring hospital so that no one finds out. Sharon warns her that the recovery process will be grueling, but Maggie informs her she doesn’t want to be looked at as the “sick” person. Get ready for an emotional storyline to come into play here.

5. Dr. Charles’ Wedding Night – Well, his wedding night didn’t turn out as planned. Following the wedding, Sharon Goodwin called everyone into the ED because of Natalie and Will’s accident. Despite having plans, Charles stuck around to help deal with the influx of patients and to be there for his co-workers. One of his patients was a young boy who they believed was overdosing. A tox report came back negative and the possibility of schizophrenia was on the table. Dr. Charles wanted to get him up to the psych ward for further examination but his grandmother refused insisting that her grandson wasn’t crazy.

Though it was a secondary plotline, it triggered me because of the massive stigma that follows mental health. A woman rather put her and her grandson in danger than allow them to take him up to a “psych ward” because of the negative connotations. Entering a psych ward doesn’t immediately make someone crazy nor does it make them lesser than. Some issues are beyond anyone’s control and shouldn’t be shamed no matter how terrifying they are.

What did you think of the Chicago Med Season 5 premiere?

Are you happy with Connor Rhodes’ exit? Did you think Ava’s death was fitting? What’s Phillip up to? Will Natalie regain her memories?

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