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Chicago Med Got a Friend in Me Review Chicago Med Got a Friend in Me Review

Chicago Med

Chicago Med – Got a Friend In Me (5×05)

Chicago Med/ NBC

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Do the doctors at Chicago Med ever just stop and think “maybe I shouldn’t be crossing this line today?”

No? I didn’t think so.

It’s truly amazing that any of them still have jobs.
Natalie took a page right out of Will’s playbook when she disregarded a parent’s wishes and forced her opinions on them.
Even worse is that she locked them out of the room and began a treatment they vehemently opposed.
It’s messy, and I had to look away because I couldn’t watch her ruin her career in such this way.
This would have been a rather gut-punching storyline had Natalie’s motivation been the child’s safety above even her career, but I don’t think that’s what’s happening.
Natalie seems to know she broke the rules, but she doesn’t care because she wants to prove a point.
But what if the kid doesn’t have pneumonia? She said she wasn’t entirely sure from the X-Rays and that it could just be a sinus infection.
There weren’t any compelling reasons to even believe pneumonia was in the picture. Even Will said it likely wasn’t the case.
It came off as her wanting so badly to be right and to show the parents that they were being negligent.
Her approach has definitely become more “I’m right, you’re wrong,” and that could be caused by her memory loss.
Sure, she seems to remember everything about being a doctor, but maybe the side-affects are that she’s more impulsive or ego-driven. We’ve seen her be agitated and short-tempered also.
I’m not sure. At first, it seemed like Chicago Med tried to paint her as a victim of both Lanik and Halstead’s overbearingness, but now there’s a reason they oversaw her treatments.
Natalie wasn’t ready for a full workload while she was still recovering, but she better be ready to pay the price for her actions because she’ll undoubtedly get arrested if not stripped of her license.
I would have expected such behavior from Will since that’s usually his M/O.
Choi was skeptical of Crockett’s when it came to patient care and teaching Noah.
His concern stemmed from caring for Noah so much. Not only did he train him for the past year, but Noah is also his girlfriend’s brother. There’s a deeper relationship there, and he didn’t want Noah to pick up any bad habits.
Thankfully, Noah seems to have his head on straight so there shouldn’t be much to worry about.
Maggie continued to keep her cancer treatments a secret, but it was becoming harder as she became weaker.
The moment where she looked in the mirror and took put on her wig to cover up the hair loss from the chemo was such a powerful portrayal of living with cancer.
They were even more powerful was when she finally worked up the courage to come clean to her friends — April and the rest of the nurses. They’ve been worried about Maggie and clearly realizing that something was up with her.
Their speechless reaction and the way Maggie took off her wig was understated. When they cried and hugged her, I felt as if Maggie was a real person and my close friend.
Dr. Charles’ wife Caroline helped Maggie come to the realization that cancer isn’t something you can fight solo.
You need the support of those closest to you to keep you up and in a positive mood when things start looking bleak.
Maggie is tough, but she doesn’t have to go through this alone. She shouldn’t have to.
Caroline’s advice was the smartest thing she did this episode because inviting both Bert and Sharon to dinner was a grave mistake.
Caroline may be feeling her own mortality, but that’s not a good enough reason to meddle in other people’s lives.
She and Dr. Charles got back together because they wanted to.
They reunited and something clicked again — no one forced them back into each other’s lives.
And Caroline would have never allowed that given how opinionated she is about her own life.
But nothing made playing matchmaker to a couple that hasn’t spoken in years a good idea.
I was just as baffled as Dr. Charles was standing there knowing damn well that Sharon wanted to give him hell for it.
There better not be a happy ending here because Burt doesn’t deserve it and Sharon’s better off without him.
Do you think Natalie’s career is over?
Will she pay the price for her actions or will she somehow get out of it?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Paging the New Chief of the ED, Ethan Choi (6×02)

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Chicago Med Those Things Hidden In Plain Sight Season 6 Episode 2

Chicago Med delivered its final powerful episode of 2020. 

That’s right, the Dick Wolf series is following in the footsteps of This Is Us and returning in the new year on January 6, 2021.

“Those Things Hidden in Plain Sight” once again tackled COVID without overwhelming viewers. Now, if you’re one of those people who doesn’t want to see the pandemic playing out on your TV screen, you’re going to have to bite the bullet because the series doesn’t seem like it’s letting up on COVID-related storylines just yet. 

However, to make up for it, it’s also offering other cases and escalating tensions between characters, so there’s still something to look forward to. 

April remained in the COVID unit, and though her heart is in this fight, she’s learning that it’s a losing battle. 

She did her best to care for Yesenia, a minor, but she didn’t manage to reunite her with her mother even after getting permission from Choi. 

Not long after Yesenia went into respiratory failure, Alejandra was brought in after testing positive for COVID. It’s unclear if both these women, who only had each other, will lose their battles with the novel virus or if we’ll see them again, but it’s a situation that April is seeing all too often. 

People come into the hospital hoping that they’ll be healed, but they reach a point where there’s nothing else doctors and nurses can do for them.

“It’s never enough,” a defeated April told Choi, which seems to be a sentiment shared by all of those working on COVID’s frontlines currently as cases surge. 

Ethan Choi leveled up as he accepted the position of Chief of ED following Lanik’s departure (can’t say that he’ll be missed). 

This obviously didn’t sit well with Will Halstead, who was misguided in his thinking that he somehow deserved this because he’d been at Med longer than Choi. 

It’s important to note that being at a job longer doesn’t automatically make you more qualified. Choi and Halstead are very different people and approach medicine in a very different way. 

It didn’t even seem like Will wanted the position until Maggie and the other nurses began gassing him up, which should tell you everything. Having just gotten out of a relationship and trying to find his footing, Will was the least likely to be considered for the role. 

It’s almost as if the nurses wanted Will to get jealous that he wasn’t promoted so that he’d start a fight with Ethan.

The duo butted heads over the treatment of Will’s patient, and when Ethan was wrong in his diagnosis, Will figured this was the perfect time to confront Sharon Goodwin about not being chosen for the role. 

It’s never been more satisfying to see someone put Will in his place. 

Will, the hot-headed and impulsive doctor, somehow thought that he deserved to be the one getting promoted to a position where he’d be responsible for calling the shots. Oh, sweet Will. 

Goodwin didn’t mince words when she made it clear that he was never even considered because of how reckless he is. 

However, Choi wasn’t a great fit either. 

He’s been just as impulsive as Will, he’s unreasonable, opinionated, and wants to exert his beliefs and code on others, which we’ve seen in previous seasons. 

They’re both equally as unqualified. Goodwin should have gone with someone outside of the ED for this one. 

It was expected that they’d get into it over their patient’s course of treatment, but now, with Choi as his boss, Will can’t really stand his ground. The truth is, they both have negative qualities and ones that make them great at their jobs, so hopefully, moving forward, they learn to listen to each other and work together.

Ideally, Halstead’s skills could be better used in a different role. Perhaps he’ll find his calling (and love) by helping Dr. Virani with the clinical trial?

April attempted to use her former relationship and closeness with Choi to get her way several times during the episode. The writers either need to let this go or get them back together, but I don’t want to see April getting preferential treatment because she previously dated Choi. 

Choi was right when he rejected bringing in the mother to say goodbye to her dying daughter. With COVID, you can never be too careful. 

The protocol made sense in Choi’s situation, but it wasn’t as black-and-white with Natalie’s pregnant patient from Cook County Jail. 

Things took an ugly turn when Natalie witnessed first hand how differently she was treated for committing the same crime a Black woman did.

Both Aisha and Natalie pushed an officer — Aisha said she did it to protect her cousin, while Natalie did it to protect Aisha when the cop wanted to take her baby.

Natalie got off with a slap on the wrist, but Aisha faced an uphill battle of going back to jail and being separated from her child all because her hearing kept getting postponed due to COVID delays. 

It showed just how flawed the system is and how it doesn’t prioritize the health and wellbeing of inmates. Aisha was a victim, but her daughter was the one who would suffer the most as a result.

It was nice to see Natalie, Goodwin, and the OBGYN try their best to help Aisha, but sadly, even their hands were tied here.

Dr. Charles’ ex-wife was brought to Med after she threw up a significant amount of blood, but the storyline was pretty weak aside from the revelation that she was planning on moving her and Anna to Arizona. 

My guess is that Anna has bonded so significantly with her father that she’s going to want to stick around. Otherwise, Dr. Charles will be forced to say goodbye to another daughter, and who knows if he can handle that! 

And then there’s Dr. Marcel who refuses to get help and masks his problems and depression with wit and charm. I hope Dr. Charles doesn’t give up trying to get through to him because Marcel could use someone to help him work through all the grief that he’s bottled up inside. 

What did you think of the episode?

We’ll see you in 2020, Chihards! 


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Gaffney Takes on COVID-19 (6×01)

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Chicago Med When Did We Begin to Change Review

Chicago Med feels different this season. 

It has nothing to do with the PPE or COVID procedures, although, that definitely brings a new dynamic to the series, it has more to do with the doctor’s being able to finally admit when they are wrong. 

Halstead even apologized for jumping to conclusions! What a change. 

While we’re not fully there quite yet – Natalie and Crockett disagreeing on a patient’s treatment in front of a patient is proof of that – it’s a massive improvement from the ego-driven storylines from previous seasons. 

Choi judged April for putting her life on the line by volunteering in the COVID unit for three straight weeks, but eventually, he saw how important her dedication was. 

April has always been a bit of a martyr who doesn’t listen to reason and puts herself into rather questionable situations, but in this case, she believed that her mission was to be there for COVID patients who didn’t have anyone else by their side.

April’s choice to risk her life was selfless. While this is just a TV show, the scenes unfolding in front of us were snippets from everyday life as we live through a pandemic. 

I’ve written numerous stories of families who lost loved ones and couldn’t be there with them as they took their last breath because the possibility of exposure to the virus was too dangerous. 

For those people, nurses like April are angels, who allow them to have one final moment with their mother, father, brother, sister, or husband via Facetime. 

A big thank you goes out to the healthcare heroes who have lived heartbreaking moments like this in real life. 

It was equally as heartbreaking to watch it play out on screen, but necessary as cases continue to surge and many people refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of COVID. 

Natalie and Crockett didn’t see eye-to-eye on treatment for a young girl with leukemia. This isn’t new for them as they often disagree, but it didn’t help the patient who made it clear that he’s trying to do right by his daughter while the world is upside down. Truer words have never been spoken. 

Eventually, Natalie and Crockett confessed that their personal lives affected their treatment of the patient, which always seems to be the case. 

Doctors and nurses told to remain impartial, but that’s impossible as we live through such unprecedented times. They’re burdened with their own tragedies as they try to save patients and make the right calls. It was just good that they acknowledged exactly what transpired. 

Will Halstead also took on a case that was a little too close to home. 

The episode kickstarted with an ambulance rolling Hannah into the ED due to an overdose. 

Through the course of the episode, and while dealing with a patient who seems to be in denial about alcoholism, Will realized that he and Hannah have both been in denial about her addiction. 

Even worse – he’s very much intertwined in her sobriety, which Dr. Charles warned him about. 

Any misstep in their relationship, like an explosive fight, set Hannah back. And, in return, Will was walking on eggshells waiting for her to relapse. 

It wasn’t a healthy environment for anyone. 

The only way Hannah would become sober, and stay sober, was if she did it for herself and not anyone else.

It was nice to see Will finally get some clarity and admit that he was wrong and Dr. Charles was right. 

This also helped him treat his patient, who wasn’t an alcoholic but suffered from a rare condition called auto-brewery syndrome that turned her carbs into yeast and made her feel drunk. 

It’s a good thing Will did some more research before jumping to conclusions and ruining this woman’s career with the FAA. The old Will wouldn’t have been so level-headed, but it takes strength to apologize and admit you were wrong. It’s the first time we’ve seen Will take ownership of his actions. 

There was also a very powerful scene between Dr. Charles and his daughter Anna, who felt guilty about going out to see her friends and unintentionally getting her dad sick with COVID. 

“You could have died,” she says. Living through a pandemic is scary, and it echoed a fear we’ve likely all had when it comes to our elderly parents or those who are immunocompromised. There’s fear, anger, blame, and all sorts of other emotions that are all valid. 

While the episode juggled COVID and non-COVID stories well, it was focused heavily on the former, which shouldn’t come as a surprise. Viewers tend to want to escape reality when watching a TV show, but a medical show simply can’t ignore the very real global pandemic that’s taken upwards of 240,000 lives. They weren’t overly realistic to the point where it was downright scary, but they did hone in on the fact that COVID affects everyone. 

I’m not a medical professional, so I’m not sure if some of the scenes were dramatized for television, but regardless, everyone should take this episode to heart to fully grasp the impact of the pandemic.

It was a powerful season premiere with a final scene that was heartbreaking to watch as the doctor’s paid tribute to all those who died of COVID. 

And for those who were wondering why no one was wearing masks in the ED, Wolf Entertainment cleared the air on Twitter writing: “Because all staff are quarantined and tested/sanitized each time they come into the hospital, they save the PPE for the nurses and doctors in the Covid ICU. When leaving the hospital, they wear masks!”

Again, this may not be realistic to how real-life hospitals operate, but I don’t think the series was aiming to downplay the severity of the virus. If I were to guess (and this is just my opinion), I’m betting that it would be hard to film a show that the audience could enjoy with the actors wearing masks the whole time. 

Other Noteworthy Moments

  • Will said what we’re all thinking: “I thought we’d be over it by now.”
  • Sharon Goodwin and I have something in common – we have Zoom fatigue! 
  •  Natalie left Owen with Nana and moved into a hotel aka “Club Med” so she could fully dedicate herself to her patients. 
  • There’s a new doctor with a British accent, Sabeen Virani, who is most definitely going to be Will’s new love interest. 
  • Once again, thank you to all the healthcare professionals who are putting their lives on the line day-in and day-out. 

What did you think of the Chicago Med Season 6 premiere?

Sound-off in the comments! 


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Coffee Table News

WATCH: #OneChicago Teams Tackle COVID-19 in New Promo Ahead of November 11

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One Chicago promo ahead of November 11 premiere

Wednesday’s most watched dramas are planning their epic return. 

Ahead of the November 11 premiere for Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD, NBC revealed a teaser that shows the heroes tackling COVID-19 headfirst. 

“When this community hurts, when it reaches out its hand, we pull it to its feet, and we respond,” Battalion Chief Wallace Boden states in the promo.

Med’s doctors jump into action as April tells  ex Choi that she has to put her life on the line to help patients who are “sick, frightened, and alone.”

Fire’s paramedic’s Brett and Mackey respond to a house call and run into some trouble when a man points a gun at them. 

Meanwhile, PD’s Atwater deals with the fallout of “snitching” on the police. While he explains he was doing “the right thing,” the white cops don’t seem to agree as Ray threatens to take his badge. 

Check it out below: 

Related Reads: Everything We Know About ‘Chicago PD’ Season 8 – Police Reform, COVID, and More!


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