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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – It’s All in the Family (5×06)

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Chicago Med missed the perfect opportunity for a Halloween episode.

Their promo for next week reveals a blood-sucking narrative, but by that point, Halloween will be over and done with.

Who makes the schedule for these episodes?

Still, between Natalie’s holistic misstep, Will’s Jehovah’s Witness patient, and a gang inductee patient, there was enough action in the ED to deem things “scary.”

And yet, the central theme focused on forgiveness.

Natalie’s situation seemed dire. She showcased reckless and irrational behavior and treated a patient against his parent’s wishes.

And somehow, she got away relatively unscathed.

It was unbelievable that after all that, she was still allowed to preside over the child’s case and didn’t have a doctor overlooking her.

Goodwin wasn’t nearly as angry as she should have been while Natalie continued defending her actions.

There was a point where she considered why she went to such extremes and thought that it was possible she was simply trying to prove Will wrong, but Maggie assured her that she needed to trust her gut.

And when the little boy’s illness started getting worse and she ruled out pneumonia, Natalie did just that ordering a scrape once again against the parent’s wishes.

The only difference is she had a court order protecting her this time.

If she made a compelling case for Goodwin to get a court order prior to forcing treatments, this could have been a much different situation.

Instead, Natalie got arrested on numerous charges. And yet, after the labs came back, the parents realized Natalie did everything in her power to help their son, and they pulled the charges.

It wasn’t pneumonia, but it was an autoimmune disorder. Natalie saved the boy’s life.

And to think the hospital wasn’t going to help her “get out of this mess.”

Unsurprisingly, Will Halstead overstepped with a patient, which seems to be what he’s good at.

It’s comical that he was overlooking Natalie to stop her from making a grave mistake and then did exactly that.

Will’s patient was a Jehovah’s Witness who would have died without a blood transfusion.

His parents refused it due to their beliefs and chose to let him die.

Will has always struggled with allowing a patient to make a choice regardless of his own beliefs, but Crockett reminded him that they had to respect it.

And even then, Will kept trying to find a loophole.

As he began digging, he realized there was a slight possibility that the man was no longer a practicing Jehovah.

His tattoo of the Holy Trinity, his blood alcohol level, the marijuana in his system at the time of the crash all pointed to him no longer following the practices and pioneering.

Once he made that clear to the parents, they abandoned their son and the doctors saved his life.

Except that’s not what the man wanted at all.

When he woke up and found out about the blood, he was distraught because although he’d “lost his faith” for a bit, he was planning to repent.

Seeing Will realize the error of his ways proved that sometimes, doctors don’t know what’s best and he should have just kept his nose out of it.

Just like he should have kept his nose out of Natalie’s business.

It’s almost like Will wants to be the most hated character on television.

Natalie trusted her instincts and broke things off with Phillip just as Will interrupted to let her know that Phillip was a liar who tried to convince her that he proposed to take advantage of her amnesia.

The story-arc has been building up over the course of multiple episodes.

Phillip was painted in more than one shady light. His overbearing nature alluded to a grander storyline than simply giving Will a dirty look and walking away.

He lied about a proposal for goodness sakes. He inserted himself into her life. He came to work multiple times to give her flowers. And he threatened Will!

And that’s how it ends?

That’s all that this storyline amounted too?

There has to be more to the story.

Will meant well, but he could have waited to catch Natalie alone instead of interrupting her conversation.

At this point, it doesn’t matter if she remembers what she wanted to tell him when she came to his car — she’s over him and his need to save her all the time.

“Get out of my life,” is a statement that means she’s made up her mind about his place in her life.

If the writers give these two a break, we’ll all be better off.

Noah and April found a patient who was getting “jumped in” into a gang.

She refused their help thinking that the gang would kill her.

And they would.

Noah tried to help Jacinta, but April ignored her pleas and called the cops, which was the right thing to do.

It’s always good to understand your place and let the appropriate people handle their jobs.

Noah stood up to his sister after Jacinta “ran away,” but in reality, she ended up crashing at Noah’s place to heal before they could get her out of town.

While Noah’s actions are admirable, he’s also putting himself in grave danger.

The one thing about being a doctor is that you cannot overstep boundaries. With the number of patients they see on a daily basis, if they got involved in everyone’s lives, they’d never have one of their own.

Who’s to say Jacinta won’t reach out to the gang?

Or what if they spot her in the neighborhood and he gets embroiled in all this drama.

It just doesn’t seem like a good idea.

Dr. Charles saw forgiveness manifest itself with a transgender patient whose ex-wife finally forgave him and comforted him during his illness.

And while a touching moment, it was merely used to convince Sharon to give Bert another chance.

I’m not sure if I’m more upset that Sharon is giving the man who hurt her another shot or that Caroline’s terrible plan actually worked.

I’m not shipping this storyline at all.

Maggie’s cancer storyline wasn’t given much screentime much like April and Choi’s personal life. We only saw April take a negative pregnancy test, which confirms that they’re actively trying but will likely run into problems.

Do you think Chicago Med is getting too soapy for its own good?

Is Natalie better off without Will?

Is this the last we’ve seen of Phillip?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season Finale Review – What’s Crockett Marcel’s Damage? (5×20)

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Chicago Med season finale a needle in the heart review

Chicago Med aired its season finale, and the series was brutally cheated from a dramatic finish or compelling cliffhanger as a result of the coronavirus shutting down production and forcing a shortened season.

Not that there was anything wrong with the episode — it was a perfectly entertaining standalone episode of the series — but it didn’t meet the expectations of a season finale.

And that’s absolutely no one’s fault. Some shows were lucky enough that the last episode in their artillery had a gut-punch while others, like Med, were forced to settle for “good enough.”

The best part of “Needle in the Heart” — a metaphorical title but also one that applied directly to Charles’ patient as he was stabbing himself in the heart with needles — was that we finally got some backstory on Crockett Marcel.

I say finally because I’ve been waiting to find out more about the dark, composed, and confident surgeon since he waltzed into the ED at the beginning of season 5.

As I expected, Crockett had a pretty dark past that was unearthed when he became the prime suspect in a cold-case murder investigation that took place several years back while he was studying in New Orleans.

The cops tried to pull Crockett out of surgery and arrest him, but Sharon Goodwin did not stand for that. And she’s right. There was absolutely no reason why they can’t wait for him to save a life before trying to ruin his.

Natalie’s expressed interest and intrigue in Crockett for a while now, almost as long as I’ve wanted to learn more about him, so she didn’t believe for a moment that he would be capable of murder.

A man who dedicates himself unconditionally to saving lives day in and day out, and who beats himself up over every unsuccessful surgery is not a man that could or would harm anyone. It’s in his blood to help others.

In an effort to clear his name, she launched her own investigation that led her to Crockett’s former buddy and his patient’s referring doctor.

The doctor also didn’t believe that the murder charges could hold up but admitted that Crockett was going through a dark period at the time of the murder as he lost his 1-year-old daughter, Harper, to leukemia.

My theory that Crockett lost a child was proven right. Looking back at the season, there were a few clues pointing to it including his reaction to seeing a child dying of cancer during the kidnapping. He seemed to understand the father’s pain and feeling of helplessness. There was also the episode where he was hard on himself for not being able to save a child and spent the entire evening drowning his sorrows at the bar.

Nat then made the connection that if Crockett had donated bone marrow to save his daughter, it could have been given to someone that adopted his DNA. This was a case of mistaken DNA!

Her meticulous attention to detail and quick thinking saved Crockett. And since the cops immediately retreated, they cops didn’t have any substantial evidence against him.

Crockett was grateful for her help until he learned that she knew his secret. His whole demeanor changed at that moment and he asked her to keep it between them since people tend to look at you differently when they know the truth.

But is there more to the story? His decision to separate himself from his loss explains why he’s chipper, carefree, and gives off the impression that he’s a ladies man.

It’s likely the death of the baby fractured his relationship with the baby momma.

And his new persona is his attempt at pushing everyone away out of fear of truly committing and hurting in the same way he did way back then.

I’m not sure if this reveal will lead to a relationship between Crockett and Natalie or if it will pull them apart.

But it also doesn’t seem like Med is interested in pursuing anything between April and Crockett.

After her breakup with Ethan, April hasn’t been doing so well. And when she found out he was a hostage in a convenience store robbery, she rushed over there to make sure he was safe.

They both seem to regret how things went down and there’s a shared love between them that they can’t seem to shake, but is it enough to put the pieces back together and fix how broken they’ve been this whole time?

The hostage situation seemed written only to make April realize the intensity of her feelings, so I wasn’t too invested in it. It’s not like there was ever any real threat to Ethan.

Halstead had his first hiccup with Hannah when he realized she’d lied to him about going to a AA meeting.

Of course, given Hannah’s prior addiction, the moment she acted suspiciously, we all assumed she was on her way to get high again.

Thankfully, that wasn’t the case as she came to the ER with her ex, who was also an addict.

Her decision to lie about where she was going and who she was with would have been problematic if she hadn’t come clean to Will, but she did without him even calling her out.

It seems Hannah didn’t want anything to get in the way of how great things were going, and you can understand how she would think an addict ex would make Halstead question her commitment to her sobriety.

However, I have to give a round of applause to Halstead remaining level-headed throughout the situation, not jumping to conclusions, and not doing anything ridiculously stupid that would destroy his relationship. I mean, what a glow-up!

Will has been good for Hannah’s recovery, and Hannah’s been good at keeping Will on the path of making sound life choices. I think I speak for all of us when I say, finally!

Halstead realized that sometimes people lie because they’re trying to help and protect other people like his patient who gave his uninsured friend his insurance card to treat a gnarly rash.

The friend’s intentions may have been pure, but he actually put his friend at risk because Halstead went off the insurance card holder’s chart and pushed an antibiotic that the other man was allergic to. Helping could have killed a friend in this case.

Dr. Charles learned the importance of believing and trusting a patient when they explain a symptom even if it doesn’t obviously present itself.

His patient kept sticking himself in the chest and heart area with needles to relieve a pressure that everyone kept writing off as anxiety.

At first, Charles made a similar diagnosis before realizing, thanks to his daughter, Anna’s middle-school boy troubles, that the man had a medical condition that needed Dr. Latham’s expertise.

However, the very notion of sticking needles into your heart had an underlying psychiatric reason and Charles still needed to help the patient cope with stress and anxiety.

Life is all about balance, and for Charles, his heavy and complex case was balanced out with his daughter’s pre-teen woes. She chose to skip a field trip to the museum and volunteer at the hospital instead only because she was embarrassed that a boy she liked didn’t like her back.

When you’re surrounded by pain and trauma all the time, little reminders like this tend to bring a smile to your face and even make you giggle a bit. It’s a silly worry, but one that feels just as real to Anna as the worries of all the other patients. It’s a good thing she has a psychologist for a father because she’s in for a wake-up call when she realizes life only gets harder. Knowing how to deal with a tough and crippling situation is half the battle.

What did you think of the episode?

Will April and Choi give it another go? Will Natalie and Crockett grow closer now that they have a deeper understanding of each other?

Why do we keep seeing Charles’ younger daughter?

Share your comments with us below, and also tell us what you thought about the season as a whole!

Until next time, Med fans!


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Choi and April Call It Quits, But is It Really Over? (5×19)

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Chicago Med Just a River in Egypt Review

These doctors need to learn how to compartmentalize on Chicago Med.

The amount of personal feelings and emotions that affect the ED at Gaffney is ridiculous.

How are these excellent doctors not able to separate their private lives from their professional lives and put forth what’s most important — saving patients?

Will Halstead used to be the biggest offender, and yet, the best thing the series could have done for him was to separate his fate from Natalie Manning’s.

The minute those two began steering clear of each other and cut all romantic ties, Halstead suddenly began thinking in a clear manner.

I mean, don’t get me wrong, he still makes questionable judgment calls, but at least he’s not leading from a place of personal benefit.

When he suggested Dr. Asher to help his patient with brain cancer, there was definitely a small part of him that wanted to help her and prove to everyone else that she’s a good doctor despite the drug addiction because he felt guilty for bringing it to light, but for the most part, he truly believes that she’s the best.

He believes in her skill, her knowledge, and that she’ll make the right calls. There’s no doubt about that.

Asher shouldn’t be shunned or demeaned because of her personal life, especially because she’s taken the necessary steps to get it in order and be the best version of herself that she can be when she steps into the hospital.

She also made the right choice, and Halstead’s decision to support her treatment plan had nothing to do with his feelings for her.

Marcie made it perfectly clear that she wanted to go through with the procedure. She was aware of the risks, and her desire to leave behind a child for her husband trumped the fear of dying.

Both Asher and Halstead honored her wishes and did their best to get the best outcome. Unfortunately, there are some cases you simply can’t win. Even Marcie’s husband understood that when he thanked Dr. Halstead for honoring his wife’s last wishes.

If anyone was blinded by feelings, it was Mrs. Curry, who we know had a thing for Halstead and previously tried to ask him out.

She thought less of Asher because of addiction and when she realized that Asher and Halstead were together, it bothered her.

We haven’t seen Dr. Asher’s post-addiction struggle play out on screen, but the series wanted us to understand that she’s been doing better thanks to Halstead.

Despite warnings that a relationship isn’t good for a recovering addict, Halstead seems to be Asher’s rock. He’s given her the confidence she needs to overcome this, which was obvious when she was vocal about her struggle and needing an NA meeting following the loss of her patient.

She’s on the right path by being able to acknowledge that she needs help.

With Halstead no longer leading with his feelings, Dr. Choi is the next in line, and he’s doing a horrible job of masking his insecurities and anger at Crockett.

The guy saw April and Crockett in the same room and almost flipped a lid.

Two separate yet connected patients were rushed into the hospital and forced Crockett, Choi, and April to all work together, and let’s say, it was an explosive combo.

Choi kept digging into Crockett and pretending that it was about his patient simply because he refused to acknowledge the real problem.

He wasn’t angry with Crockett (at least not fully), he was angry at April. He simply used Crockett as a punching bag.

Dr. Charles gave us some of his best work when he told Choi that it’s often easier to focus anxiety and anger elsewhere because it’s easier to face the pain of looking at the real issue.

Once Choi realized that he could throw a million punches at Crockett and it still wouldn’t make him feel better, he knew what he had to do, and it’s something that he should have done when he first found out about April’s cheating.

Instead, he went around acting petty and leading with anger which was a disturbance for staff and patients.

April seemed rather surprised by Choi’s decision to break up, but girl, what did you expect?

Choi could have forgiven the act of cheating and kissing another man, but he couldn’t forgive being lied to for weeks.

She tried to mask the problem by going all in on the IVF, but a baby, as we all should know by now, is never going to fix the problem.

Choi would never be able to trust April completely, and he’d never get over her fleeting fling with Crockett.

And while April might be distraught, she has to know that this is for the best because it gives her the opportunity to pursue her deeply repressed feelings for Crockett.

She didn’t just mess up during surgery because of Ethan, she messed up because getting so close to Crockett makes her nervous that she’s slip up again.

Crockett is a mystery wrapped inside a riddle that I very much want to unravel.

He’s the most composed of all of them, he takes risks, but most importantly, he’s able to own up to his mistakes. On the outside, he seems like a great guy, but there’s something bubbling inside, some darkness that we haven’t tapped into yet.

Natalie is seeing it because she questioned if he’s alright, but the fact that Crockett refused to talk about it says a lot.

And, of course, I still can’t shake the storyline where he wasn’t able to save a child and drowned his sorrow at the bottom of a bottle at the bar. I’m holding firm in my theory that he has experienced the loss of a child which ruined his relationship or marriage.

Dr. Choi’s patient, Zach, clearly wanted to commit suicide and was being coaxed by his father to say that a homeless man pushed him.

It was disturbing to see a father completely disregard his son’s issues and claim that depression was a sign of weakness. Yes, he was scared his son would get arrested and charged for vehicular manslaughter, but it was more than that. He was embarrassed and ashamed to acknowledge that his son had a legitimate problem. He felt it made him less of a man.

Our society needs to get to a point where people realize that matters of the mind are just as real of an issue as a heart attack or diabetes. The quicker we do that, the better for all children and adults suffering in silence.

Can you just imagine how bad it must be to live with someone like that that the kid tries to kill himself and the mother refused to say a word even though she knew that by not speaking up, she could lose her child for good?

It’s a heartbreaking realization made even more daunting when you realize it’s real life for some people.

Hopefully, the mother will find the courage to reach out to Charles and give her son a fighting chance.

Maggie and Ben are also giving Auggie a fighting chance.

We all saw the fostering (which will likely turn to adoption) storyline coming from a mile away, but it was still touching when it happened.

Maggie and Ben grew attached to Auggie while he was in the hospital, but more importantly, they were the only ones capable of offering him the kind of care that he truly needed.

Maggie knew everything from his favorite breakfast to what made him laugh to the kind of treatment he needed.

She didn’t have to prep for being his foster mom, she already was his foster mom with or without the paperwork.

The storyline was also able to briefly shine a light on how inequipped DCFS is to make choices for a child that could potentially save his life.

They wouldn’t sign off on a treatment deemed necessary by doctors because they thought it wasn’t necessary. Seriously, what?

Helping a child who feels like no one wants him is hard enough, it shouldn’t have to come with several hoops to jump in order to get him the proper care.

Speaking of parenthood, Sharon is concerned about her son. At first, finding out that Michael got a job at Med was music to her ears, but when he began trying to get personal information on her doctors and surgeons, she got a little worried.

Her radar really went off when Dr. Lanik told her that her son was a great salesman because he gifted him a bottle of scotch.

At that point, Sharon knew that Michael’s tactic was to bribe the staff into giving him their time and using Kender’s products.

As someone who advocates for her doctors and fights against the system on multiple occasions, you know she won’t stand for this in her OR, but she’s personally involved now.

How will she handle it?

For an impromptu penultimate episode, Chicago Med brought out some of their best work and set the stage for a promising early season finale. If it feels slightly premature, you’re right, next week is the last episode because coronavirus forced the series to shutter production so they have no episodes left in the reserve. Womp womp.

What did you think of the episode, Cravers? Did Choi do the right thing by ending things with April?

What’s Crockett’s big secret?


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Halstead Undermines Dr. Charles and Makes a Bad Call (5×18)

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Chicago Med In the name of love Review

Before I go into this review, I have to say that seeing the credits roll out at the end of Chicago Med emphasized just how deeply coronavirus is going to impact the television landscape. We know that Med shuttered production on season 5 prematurely, and it’s bound to affect episode count, however, for now, the series clarified that it’ll be back in two weeks on April 8.

https://twitter.com/NBCChicagoMed/status/1242980185978232834?s=20

“In the Name of Love” proved that Halstead continues to be his own worst enemy. That guy can’t get it right if his life depended on it.

He constantly makes terrible decisions that are usually driven by his own ego and need to be right.

Dr. Charles made it very clear (very clear) that his patient with Alzheimer’s was not in the right frame of mind to make decisions or override a previous advanced directive she signed off on before the disease took control, and yet, he still undermined him and chose to save her.

Sure, she verbally expressed her desire to be saved, but as Charles pointed out, a brief fluctuation in cognition should not be assumed as a breakthrough.

Halstead didn’t just undermine Charles, he disregarded the patient’s final act of self-determination and caused an abundance of suffering for a family who was simply acting on her previously disclosed wishes.

None of this is surprising, however. Not with Will Halstead.

Goodwin said it right that with Halstead, it’s a case of deja vu that’s all too familiar. How does he never learn?

It seemed like he may have had a moment of clarity when Charles advised him against pursuing a relationship with Hannah because it would be detrimental to her recovery.

He said it’s common for someone to have blinders to something they don’t want to hear, and it seemed like the message came across loud and clear to Halstead.

He even informed Hannah that they should stay clear of anything romantic to give her time to recover, but she didn’t have to do more than bat her eyelashes and his mind changed completely.

Honestly, Halstead, stand your ground and make the right choice once in your life.

Hannah has proven over and over that she knows what to say to get her way, but she’s not going to cope well when things hit the fan and it’ll be his fault.

Nat and Crockett have an interesting professional relationship. They both want more, but they’re quick to turn on each other when they disagree on patient care, which happened when he convinced her patient to undergo an extremely radical surgery that could result in death.

Natalie thought his decisions were biased and motivated by professional advancement, but Crockett stood his ground because it was the best course of treatment. Plus, he was confident in himself.

Initially, the surgery was a massive success, but as Crockett, Nick, and Alice were celebrating, Nick lost consciousness and died thus proving Natalie right.

It would have been so easy for her to say “I told you so,” but Nat was thoroughly impressed by Crockett’s motivation.

After talking with Alice, she also realized she was focusing solely on this one patient while Crockett was viewing the bigger picture and making leaps to perfect the procedure for future patients including Nick’s son.

Of course, Nick was terrified, but he was already terminal, so his decision prioritized others who could still have a fighting chance. It may be the biggest sacrifice he’s ever given his son, and I wish that we could get a follow-up to this storyline somewhere down the line.

Chicago Med In the name of love Review

CHICAGO MED — “In The Name Of Love” Episode 518 — Pictured: (l-r) S. Epatha Merkerson as Sharon Goodwin, Hampton Fluker as Michael Goodwin — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

There was definitely a moment between Nat and Crockett, which was interrupted by some new chick he was seeing. It’s unclear why he wants to maintain an image of a playboy when he very clearly is a good man and a good doctor.

I’m patiently waiting for the episode that gives us more insight into his past.

Tensions were high between April and Choi after he found out that she cheated with him on Season 5 Episode 17.

For much of the episode, Choi was projecting his own fears, insecurities, and anger at his patient, a woman who almost died because she was ingesting too much protein that was harming her.

Choi didn’t believe her and said that she was either lying or in denial, which applied perfectly to April. I assumed the culprit was her smoothies and was shocked that her boyfriend was essentially drugging her to prevent her from losing weight because he was scared that if she did, she’d leave him.

The woman was pretty calm about the situation after finding out the truth because “his heart was in the right place,” but let’s not shy away from the very real problem that this man has a boatload of insecurities that he has to work through and that might potentially be dangerous to others.

Choi was just as shocked as I was at her nonchalant reaction, but April pointed out that he’s basically been acting like that towards her about her cheating slip-up.

Of course, April wants him to be angry because it’ll justify the anger she herself feels. And Choi did get a little worked up, but made a good point — why are they talking about it if she doesn’t have feelings for him?

April’s consumed by guilt largely because she still feels something for Crockett. Even now, she’s not being honest with herself.

She may love Ethan and want to be with him, but she’s always going to have this part of herself that’s drawn to Crockett.

The best thing they can do right now is to take a break and get some space.

Goodwin had a rough day. In addition to dealing with Halstead’s mess, again, she also had to come clean about her relationship with Burt and confront what it meant for the family.

While I’ve never been fond of her taking back the cheater, I have to admit Goodwin framed it in a valid way when she explained it to her equally-as-upset son, Michael.

Burt may have been the catalyst, but they both contributed to the fallout of their 35-year marriage. Burt has attempted to atone for his mistakes and there’s no point in living in the past, pointing fingers, or focusing on those mistakes.

Their primary focus should be on the future and while it’s unclear if they’ll get back together, they are all still a family and need to start acting like one and healing.

Michael didn’t want to hear it, but it was necessary. If his mother can get over it, so can he.

Maggie and Ben helped treat one of his students, a sick boy named Auggie, whose foster care mother gave him up because it was too much to handle and she wasn’t equipped.

It’s incredibly sad to see someone crumble under the pressures of not being able to take care of a special needs child. It’s her responsibility to get him to necessary appointments yet she gets absolutely no help to make it happen and struggles to find the time because she’s working.

Of course, this led Auggie to believe no one wanted him, and as he stayed the night at the hospital while they contacted social services, Maggie and Ben canceled their honeymoon to be with him.

We all know they’re going to attempt to legally adopt Auggie, and can I just say, out of all the storylines on this series, the writers have nailed Maggie’s.

Maggie and Ben love helping people, they know what it’s like to be sick and need someone to rely on, and they both found each other while battling cancer — there’s no one more equipped for this role.

What did you like about the episode? What were you not a fan of?

Share your thoughts now!


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