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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – Nothing to Fear (3×02)

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Being a doctor is stressful. Not only do you have to fear for your safety when it comes to certain mentally ill patients, you also have to accept that many times, they will argue with your medically sound diagnosis and put their lives at risk. It’s even worse when children are in involved.

Natalie and Will’s patient strikes me as a mother who is fearful of hurting her unborn child and giving into the health-fads that so many young adults are exposed to now. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with wanting to eat clean and be healthy but when you take it too far, you put your child in danger. In this case, her intentions were in the right place but her baby wasn’t getting the nutrients to grow thus Halstead thought she was only 5-months pregnant instead of 8.

Even worse is that she didn’t trust doctors and believed they were going to pump her with chemicals instead of helping her. Usually, Halstead is the one to go against a patient’s wishes to save them but this time, Natalie couldn’t stand by idly and watch this woman kill her baby. Thankfully, the husband was more understanding and convinced his wife not to press charges. But it brings up quite an important issue — fathers really don’t have a say in what happens to their child. And doctors can’t do much, even if they know the mother is making irrational decisions. That’s scary.

Most patients won’t be aggressive if they don’t like your diagnosis but there’s a handful that will rage out, like the patient that shot Dr. Charles. It’s understandable that the doctors are on edge, especially because shortly after that incident, Dr. Reese has to deal with a sociopathic woman who injected insulin into her body even though she isn’t diabetic. Her excuse is that she purposefully wanted to have a medical emergency to delay her divorce hearing, which I guess can be written off as desperate. However, when Reese refused to write her a doctor’s note for the judge, she got hostile. Dr. Charles persuaded Reese into clinically diagnosing the patient and just went she thought she had a breakthrough, she realized the woman stole her prescription pad.

Was Reese right about yanking her purse to prove her point? Probably not. You simply do not know how crazy people will react. However, her freak out on the rooftop is totally normal. I believe mental issues are the real deal and many times, not treated properly. But I also believe that people use the mental excuse to get away with doing a lot of terrible things even when they know better. So while a psychologist should be there to provide a diagnosis whether someone was in a sane state of mind, they shouldn’t always be off the hook for threatening and dangerous actions.

Once again, this brings up a very valid point when it comes to dealing with a variety of patients. You want them to trust you but in order for that to happen, you have to trust them and be vulnerable, which exposes you to being taken advantage of.

Med has had its fair share of relationships but it seems that things get a little messy when two people who work directly with each other also start sleeping together. That’s the case for April and Dr. Choi, who are terrible at keeping their relationship a secret from co-workers by the way. Choi immediately assumes that because he’s sleeping with April, she’ll go along with every medical diagnosis he makes. And even though Choi has never said or given off the impression that he thinks less of her because she’s just a nurse, she feels inadequate and lesser. Turns out, there’s a reason why doctors and nurses work together — oftentimes, one notices something the other one didn’t. In this case, because Choi didn’t know the patient well, he knew he needed an X-Ray. And because April knew the patient, she was able to smooth things over that he may have disagreed with.

As for Dr. Rhodes, he’s totally burning out. Can you blame him? Robin is quite the handful and there’s no guarantee what she’ll do next or if she’s going to get better anytime soon. But then he also has to deal with Dr, Bekker who is set on making his life a living hell. Even under stress, he’s a good doctor who puts his patients first and makes the right calls. But because Bekker keeps putting him down to Dr. Latham, he gets benched when a patient returns with a valve leak from one of his procedures. When it turns out to be a faulty valve, he gains Latham’s trust back. But will he break soon enough? Or will their bickering ruin both their careers or worse, hurt a patient?

Thoughts on Chicago Med? Do you think there are too many relationships in the ED? Dr. Choi and April are hot and heavy, Natalie and Halstead are finally heating up, Noah is trying to make it happen with Dr. Reese while Dr. Rhodes and Robin are hanging on by a thread.

 


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Winning the Battle, but Still Losing the War (803)

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Chicago Med Season 8 Episode 3 Recap Winning the Battle, but Still Loosing the Wa

Welcome to the Wild, Wild West… er, sorry, Gaffney Medical. 

Chicago Med Season 8 Episode 3 connected back to a patient introduced earlier this season, and I’m so glad that it did because, in my previous review, I mentioned being disappointed that the series just left us hanging when it came to David’s care.

The young man, who Charles diagnosed with schizophrenia in the season 8 premiere episode, was rushed to the ED after running naked into traffic. During his evaluation, Charles and Cuevas informed David’s mother that he was suffering from delusion persecution, which is common in untreated patients. Of course, if you remember, David’s parents had a pretty dramatic reaction to his diagnosis when it was first revealed, which caused them to bolt out of the hospital, something the mother apologizes for. It’s clear now that David’s episodes are only intensifying and this isn’t something they can just turn a blind eye to. David needs real help from professionals—the reality is that he’s dealing with a mental health issue that’s not going to go away anytime soon.

All the stress caused David’s father to collapse, and honestly, if you’re going to have any kind of medical emergency, there’s no better place than the ED. While it seemed as though he had a heart attack, it was actually a tear near his heart that required open heart surgery. The poor mom was just trying to manage everything and navigate this new world for her family, but thankfully, the procedure went off without a hitch. 

The tension between Charles and Cuevas came to a head when they disagreed on how to treat David. Cuevas then bypassed Charles and gave him a high dose of meds to calm him down, which upset Charles as it diminished any progress of building trust that they previously made. Cuevas, however, stood by her decision because it was the “standard care of treatment,” which honestly, infuriated Charles even more. She may not be a trainee, but it’s a rookie mistake as she looked at the patient with a one lens fits all rather than as a human being that has individual needs. She also scoffed at Charles’ approach of giving into David’s delusions because “the literature” warned against it, but Charles, who has been doing this for most of his life, knows what works in actuality better than anyone. 

While Cuevas certainly rubbed me the wrong way, I was really happy to see her come around. There’s no argument that there’s a benefit to updating old and outdated processes, but sometimes, those are the ones that work best. Instead of overriding Dr. Charles, she should’ve been learning from him, asking questions, following his cues, and just absorbing the in-real-life knowledge. That’s why there are mentors and attendees and all that fun stuff. 

But that’s a lesson that needs to be extended to literally most of the residents this season, including Crockett’s resident Kai. Crockett apologized to him, but you could tell that Kai didn’t learn from his mistake and still thought he knew better. I can’t wait for this to come up in future episodes.

Unfortunately, Crockett didn’t exactly make the best decisions this week, as he gave a patient steroids in order to “con” a surgery that Sam refused to do because of the risky outcomes. When Sam pieced it together, he was livid, but when he took it out on Vanessa, she was completely confused. Crockett, who was supposed to be her partner, left her in the dark completely. And when she confronted him about it, his excuse was that his status at the hospital offered him more protection so he was just keeping her out of it. It’s admirable when a doctor wants to go above and beyond for their patient, but some rules simply aren’t worth breaking. And Sam was already weary of Crockett’s judgment after what transpired with Pamela Blake. Now, it seems Crockett has two enemies in the ED…. and the list just keeps growing. 

Halstead also made a poor decision when treating his patient who had a confirmed case of MRSA. Supply chain issues hit Gaffney, so a system was put in place that prevented some medications that were in demand and in short supply from being prescribed, including the antibiotic necessary for Halstead’s patient. Sharon wouldn’t budge on it either, giving him a workaround that didn’t exactly sound appealing to him. So what did Halstead do? He prescribed a medication that his patient was clearly allergic to and then promised to try to mitigate the reaction as part of some exposure procedure. It worked, but it was definitely risky, and Goodwin knew that if something had gone wrong, Halstead’s decision wouldn’t have been upheld in court. Of course, Halstead is known for making rogue decisions and getting away with it so I don’t expect this to be any different.

And finally, Dr. Choi treated a pregnant patient who refused to be treated by Hannah Asher because of her addiction. Choi didn’t fight the patient on it or question it, but when Asher found out, she was not pleased, thinking that it meant that Choi didn’t think she was qualified. That is until Liza became very sick and Asher immediately recognized her. Liza was going through withdrawals, but since she found out she was pregnant, she didn’t want them to drug test her and take away her baby. It was a heartbreaking scene, especially as Liza acknowledges her past mistakes and vowed to do better for her unborn child. And, as Choi pointed out, no one would’ve been able to connect with her the way Dr. Asher did since no one else had ever battled addiction before. I was, however, pleasantly surprised that Choi agreed to turn the other way rather than reporting Liza for using while pregnant. He’s making progress! 

Asher made a comment about not wanting to be plagued by her past, but sometimes, your past really comes in handy and allows you to learn and grow while still acknowledging the road traveled. 

What did you think of the episode?


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Interns and Doctors (8×02)

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Chicago Med Review (Caught Between) The Wrecking Ball and The Butterfly Season 8 Episode 2

After eight seasons, Chicago Med hasn’t run out of creative storyline ideas, and for that, I’m thankful. 

On Chicago Med Season 8 Episode 2,  the hospital’s most stubborn doctors, Halstead and Archer, once again allowed their personal situations and opinions to cloud their judgment and impact patient care. It’s so frustrating that we keep going in circles with these two, but it did seem as though there was a resolution towards the end of the episode. Maybe this is the turning point after all?

Halstead was clinging to what could’ve been with his apartment complex rather than taking the loss as everyone advised him. I believe Hannah Asher’s exact words were that he was enjoying playing the martyr a little too much, and honestly, it’s been a while since anyone has ever been that blunt with him. The truth is, Halstead was simply in denial, but his case of the week, involving a young boy named Henry and his mother, seemed to help him change his mind. 

Unlike Jenny, who turned into a butterfly just like Henry’s chrysalis after she was properly diagnosed with a tumor that was causing her a psychotic break, Halstead’s building did not have a happy ending in sight. It wasn’t an easy fix, and so he needed to be just as brave as Henry and do the right thing—allow the city to drive a wrecking ball right through it. It definitely seems like the series is against giving Halstead any sliver of happiness, but sometimes, I’m fine with it considering he’s so arrogant when it comes to his patients. 

Instead of trying to find a solution to help Jenny the way that Hannah and Dr. Charles did, he immediately wrote her off as insane and kept pressuring Charles to get a court order so he could treat the boy. Yes, Henry’s broken arm needed to be tended to, but without knowing Jenny’s condition, it seemed premature to loop in DCFS. Once they are called, it’s difficult to walk that back. And Henry seemed to truly care about his mother while believing that she would get better in time. 

I’m glad that Hannah didn’t give up even when it seemed as though they exhausted all of their options. She knows just how necessary a proper diagnosis is. And if they had given up, it would’ve torn a family apart and never given Jenny a shot at redemption. 

Similarly, Archer couldn’t compartmentalize his personal feelings when treating Al, a patient he diagnosed with MS a few years ago. Al was adamant about not getting intubated as his biggest fear was living out the rest of his life on the vent. When assured him that he was fine with dying, Arche was triggered. Having just met with his son who was content with staying in prison, Al’s acceptance sounded like he was just giving up. He chose to fight for Al since his son didn’t allow him to fight for him, and when Choi attempted to sway Archer to honor Al’s wishes, he pushed him aside. The ego is so powerful with this one. Whereas Will passes judgment on patients, Archer is stubborn and wants to override their decisions because he knows better or can’t accept the outcome that they already have. Pushing Al to go under sedation sealed his fate with the incubator. It’s an unfortunate turn of events, but at the very least, it helped Archer recognize a core issue within himself so that he could mend his relationship with his son. 

Archer was also pretty rude to the new intern, Zach, and while I understand everyone’s frustration with the younger generation that’s just learning the ropes, if they don’t help them out and teach it to them, who will? 

It was sweet of Choi to extend his help to Zach, who was only behind because of COVID. Since the pandemic, everything was online, which meant he didn’t have a chance to practice medicine in person, which isn’t ideal. Instead of writing him off for his lack of experience, Choi was determined to help Zach excel. We need more people like Choi in this world!

Of course, not all interns are created equal, and Kai came in with an attitude that didn’t sit right with anyone. Who is this man thinking he can get away with talking to Crockett like that? Crockett is one of Med’s best doctors, and Kai would do wise by shutting his mouth and learning a thing or two. I don’t even know how Kai was able to take their patient to get an angio—did he override Crockett?

Kai’s presence is a shake-up for Med as we’ve never had someone with his gusto for being better and right than the tenured staff, and it’s going to be fun to see how he works alongside Crockett now that he’s filed a complaint with HR. Also, HR, really? Oh boy. The man is truly too full of himself. It’s ballsy for a guy who almost killed a patient with his poor decision. Crockett could’ve filed a countercomplaint, but that would be too easy. Instead, he’s going to make sure that Kai learns his lesson and becomes the kind of person that plays nice with others. 

And then there was Maggie’s whole dilemma with Grant. Grant is obviously interested in forming some kind of relationship with her, but she’s also being a little too intense. She’s projecting all her feelings and worries onto the situation instead of just letting it unfold. What if Grant isn’t interested in her? What if he just wants to get to know Vanessa and experience it with Maggie? By not telling Ben the truth about Grant for over a month, Maggie made it worse than it was. Ben wasn’t even phased when she initially told him, but when she started explaining herself, it became obvious that Grant’s presence is bringing up some old feelings, which didn’t sit well with Ben. Maggie would’ve been better off just introducing the two gentlemen to each other and having a big family lunch.

There was a lot of personal growth for each of the characters that was brought to light through the patients they treated making this a highly compelling installment. 

What did you think of the episode?


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season 8 Premiere Review – [SPOILER] Dies After the Fire

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Chicago Med ow Do You Begin to Count the Losses Season 8 Episode 1

The Chicago Med Season 8 premiere didn’t skip a beat, picking up right in the thick of the fire at Halstead’s apartment complex.

While everyone managed to get out safely, with a little help from the Chicago Fire department, the aftermath of the incident played a huge role in the episode as everyone involved was somehow affected in the long run, particularly Dylan, who lost Milena when she bled out from her gunshot wound.

The promising couple never got their chance to stand in the sun, which was unfortunate, but in her last moments, Milena assured Dylan that it wasn’t his fault. That, of course, didn’t make her death any less painful or tragic, nor did it stop Dylan from blaming himself as the guilt consumed him because he was the one that shot the gun.

At the end of the day, Dylan is a protector. He wants to help everyone and do good, so he felt as though he failed Milena. 

It’s unfortunate that there wasn’t a happy ending for this couple or that they didn’t get a little more time together. Their romance was short-lived when it could’ve been the source of a stellar PD/Med crossover throughout the season. 

Milena’s death wasn’t entirely surprising considering Riley Voelkel likely has other projects to attend to. And it is a changing point in the series as it underscores the dangers that come with undercover work while also pushing Dylan to finally make a choice about his future. 

Dylan has been a breath of fresh air for Med, but he was consistently torn between being a doctor and a cop. He may wear the white coat now, but he still bled blue, and Milena’s death showed him that there was no path forward in Chicago as he would always find himself walking the line between both duties. He couldn’t shake the past no matter how badly he wanted to, so, he decided to leave Med and find a fresh start. I can’t blame him either as everything here would have reminded him of the future he envisioned and lost with a woman he didn’t even realize he was falling in love with. 

Dylan’s exit is a loss, and I selfishly would have preferred if he went over to Chicago PD instead and played around with the Intelligence unit a bit. They could use a man that’s passionate about doing the right thing and helping clean up Chicago. 

Hannah Asher also experienced some side effects from the fire. Halstead didn’t know she was even home, so it’s a miracle she got out. But despite being cleared for smoke inhalation, she began having trouble breathing and a scan later revealed that the smoke triggered some heroin residue in her lungs. Much like Dylan, Hannah also can’t seem to shake the past.

Chicago Med ow Do You Begin to Count the Losses Season 8 Episode 1

CHICAGO MED — “How Do You Begin to Count the Losses” Episode 801 — Pictured: (l-r) Brian Tee as Ethan Choi, Jessy Schram as Hannah Asher, Nick Gehlfuss as Will Halstead — (Photo by: George Burns Jr./NBC)

Halstead remained by Hannah’s side throughout, but he continues to be the same problematic character. How has he experienced no character growth over the years? In some moments, he’s fine, but mostly, he butts heads with everyone and claims to know better. It’s exhausting.

Choi was right when he told Halstead that he was too close to Hannah. They may not be together as a couple, but he obviously still cares for her in some capacity. This is the core reason why a doctor is never allowed to treat a loved one. His judgment was skewed when it came to Hannah, especially as he was feeling particularly guilty that she was in this situation because of him.

As for who was responsible for the fire, well, all fingers seemed to point to Goran as the likeliest suspect as he figured out that Milena was an undercover cop when he saw her getting cozy to Dylan. However, since that was the obvious choice, it actually ended up being Jesse from Vasik, which wasn’t entirely surprising either as the fire was perfectly timed to the start of the trial where her reputation was going to be dragged through the mud. 

Jesse didn’t want to face the punishment, so she attempted to kill Halstead so that he couldn’t testify, in turn, making things much worse for herself. Did she seriously think they wouldn’t catch her? When Halstead’s brother is part of PD’s Intelligence? She deserves everything coming her way. 

With Jesse arrested, let’s hope that this whole VasCom drama is put behind us once and for all because it’s been dragging out way too long. 

Elsewhere, Crockett was dealing with the fallout of his choice to save Pamela Blake’s life, which, unfortunately, came at the cost of her surgical skills.

It’s a bummer to see everyone bash Crockett— Sam even suggested that his decision was opportunistic to sideline the Chief of Transplant—when, in reality, Crockett was a man terrified of the possibility of losing the woman he loved. 

Blake’s anger is understandable as she’s only ever seen herself as a top-tier surgeon, so this setback forces her to question and reframe everything, but I do think she’ll come around when she puts herself in Crockett’s shoes. While he seemed to regret his decision initially, when Sharon Goodwin forbid him from departing the transplant team, he realized that he needed to continue doing the job. And he stood by his decision with Blake, informing her that if the roles were reversed, she would’ve done the same thing. I’m truly living for Crockett’s vulnerability. 

He was also essential in saving Goran’s life during the transplant, once again proving that Med will be in fine hands until Blake returns because she taught him well. 

There were some stellar moments between Neil and Dr. Charles, along with the new psych student, Nellie Cuavas (Lilah Richcreek Estrada), and it goes to show that Chicago Med is committed to keeping mental health stories at the forefront. Cuavas got an unfiltered look at what it’s like to diagnose an underage patient whose parents weren’t interested in seeking the help that their child needs due to stigma. It’s unfortunate the storyline didn’t really find a resolution once the parents were informed that their son was diagnosed with schizophrenia, but it just shows that sometimes, as a doctor, your hands are tied no matter how hard you try. 

Neil previously attempted to dismiss mental health and Charles’ work in the ED, but it’s nice to see him coming around and acknowledging that it is necessary. He even opened up about his estranged son, who he lost to addiction. He clarifies that his son isn’t dead, he just doesn’t have any kind of relationship with him, though, that’s about to change because towards the end of the episode, Neil accepted a call from his son from the Cook County Jail. while it’s heartbreaking to find out your kid is in jail, at least he now knows his whereabouts and they can start mending the fractures. It’ll be fun to explore this storyline further and get to know a different side of Neil. 

Maggie is struggling with finding a place for her ex, Grant, in her life. It’s clear that there are plenty of feelings bubbling back up to the surface after she reunited Vanessa with her birth father. When Grant approached Maggie asking if she ever wonders what would have happened if their parents didn’t force them to put Vanessa up for adoption, she shot him down immediately, but her need to inform him that she’s happy with her husband, Ben, was telling about her state of mind. Since it’s evident her relationship with Grant didn’t end on her own terms, Maggie has a lot to work through. Hopefully, she doesn’t jeopardize the good thing she has with Ben, to give things with Grant another shot, but honestly, Maggie has always wanted a big happy family, so I can see why her heart is being pulled in this direction that guarantees her that outcome.

And finally, April is back in town! It’s unclear if Yaya Dacosta is going to return to Gaffney after finishing her NP program and returning to Chicago, but it does put into perspective Choi’s comment to Halstead that “feelings” don’t “disappear.” His feelings for April never disappeared, and when they accidentally meet at his father’s grave, there’s definitely plenty of love and chemistry between them. Will they give their relationship another try? After all, they made sure that neither one got married or moved on.

What did you think of the season premiere? Do you like how the Chicago franchise is staging mini crossovers with a little appearance from Fire’s Herman and PD’s Kim Burgess?

Sound off in the comments below!


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