Connect with us
Chicago PD Nothing to fEar Chicago PD Nothing to fEar

Chicago Med

Chicago Med – Nothing to Fear (3×02)

Chicago PD/ NBC

Published

on


Being a doctor is stressful. Not only do you have to fear for your safety when it comes to certain mentally ill patients, you also have to accept that many times, they will argue with your medically sound diagnosis and put their lives at risk. It’s even worse when children are in involved.

Natalie and Will’s patient strikes me as a mother who is fearful of hurting her unborn child and giving into the health-fads that so many young adults are exposed to now. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with wanting to eat clean and be healthy but when you take it too far, you put your child in danger. In this case, her intentions were in the right place but her baby wasn’t getting the nutrients to grow thus Halstead thought she was only 5-months pregnant instead of 8.

Even worse is that she didn’t trust doctors and believed they were going to pump her with chemicals instead of helping her. Usually, Halstead is the one to go against a patient’s wishes to save them but this time, Natalie couldn’t stand by idly and watch this woman kill her baby. Thankfully, the husband was more understanding and convinced his wife not to press charges. But it brings up quite an important issue — fathers really don’t have a say in what happens to their child. And doctors can’t do much, even if they know the mother is making irrational decisions. That’s scary.

Most patients won’t be aggressive if they don’t like your diagnosis but there’s a handful that will rage out, like the patient that shot Dr. Charles. It’s understandable that the doctors are on edge, especially because shortly after that incident, Dr. Reese has to deal with a sociopathic woman who injected insulin into her body even though she isn’t diabetic. Her excuse is that she purposefully wanted to have a medical emergency to delay her divorce hearing, which I guess can be written off as desperate. However, when Reese refused to write her a doctor’s note for the judge, she got hostile. Dr. Charles persuaded Reese into clinically diagnosing the patient and just went she thought she had a breakthrough, she realized the woman stole her prescription pad.

Was Reese right about yanking her purse to prove her point? Probably not. You simply do not know how crazy people will react. However, her freak out on the rooftop is totally normal. I believe mental issues are the real deal and many times, not treated properly. But I also believe that people use the mental excuse to get away with doing a lot of terrible things even when they know better. So while a psychologist should be there to provide a diagnosis whether someone was in a sane state of mind, they shouldn’t always be off the hook for threatening and dangerous actions.

Once again, this brings up a very valid point when it comes to dealing with a variety of patients. You want them to trust you but in order for that to happen, you have to trust them and be vulnerable, which exposes you to being taken advantage of.

Med has had its fair share of relationships but it seems that things get a little messy when two people who work directly with each other also start sleeping together. That’s the case for April and Dr. Choi, who are terrible at keeping their relationship a secret from co-workers by the way. Choi immediately assumes that because he’s sleeping with April, she’ll go along with every medical diagnosis he makes. And even though Choi has never said or given off the impression that he thinks less of her because she’s just a nurse, she feels inadequate and lesser. Turns out, there’s a reason why doctors and nurses work together — oftentimes, one notices something the other one didn’t. In this case, because Choi didn’t know the patient well, he knew he needed an X-Ray. And because April knew the patient, she was able to smooth things over that he may have disagreed with.

As for Dr. Rhodes, he’s totally burning out. Can you blame him? Robin is quite the handful and there’s no guarantee what she’ll do next or if she’s going to get better anytime soon. But then he also has to deal with Dr, Bekker who is set on making his life a living hell. Even under stress, he’s a good doctor who puts his patients first and makes the right calls. But because Bekker keeps putting him down to Dr. Latham, he gets benched when a patient returns with a valve leak from one of his procedures. When it turns out to be a faulty valve, he gains Latham’s trust back. But will he break soon enough? Or will their bickering ruin both their careers or worse, hurt a patient?

Thoughts on Chicago Med? Do you think there are too many relationships in the ED? Dr. Choi and April are hot and heavy, Natalie and Halstead are finally heating up, Noah is trying to make it happen with Dr. Reese while Dr. Rhodes and Robin are hanging on by a thread.

 


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – What a Tangled Web We Weave (6×13)

Published

on

Chicago Med Review What a Tangled Web We Weave Season 6 Episode 13

It’s rare that a Chicago Med episode focuses on Sharon Goodwin!

We’re used to seeing her mediating problems that arise within the hospital and between doctors, but on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 13, she was in the driver’s seat… quite literally.

A car accident sent Goodwin into a spiral after she accidentally hit a young boy who was on his bicycle.

The accident made Goodwin, who is usually levelheaded, act wildly out of character as she tried to “fix” the situation. 

Dr. Choi and Dr. Charles advised her not to get involved as it was grounds for a lawsuit, but she simply couldn’t help herself.

Even when she was cleared of any wrongdoing — the police confirmed that the boy came out of nowhere and it wasn’t her fault — she was still overcome with guilt and wanted to help in any way she could. 

Confronting the mother wasn’t the smartest choice on her part. Audiences and hospital staff know Goodwin, her character, and her heart, so we know she meant well and was coming from a place of love, but to a mother whose world has just been turned upside down, it was too soon and looked like damage-control. 

No matter what led to the accident, the mom couldn’t help but blame Goodwin for what she’d done.

Things got even worse when Goodwin found out that DCFS was involved as the crash led them to the revelation that the mother was working a night shift and leaving her kids home alone.

Goodwin decided to offer the mother a custodian job at Gaffney during the day in hopes of alleviating some of the burden, which was actually a great solution and the least she could do.

Unfortunately, we never found out if they called off DCFS and if the mom was able to keep custody of her children. 

You’d think after putting so much effort into the storyline, we’d at least get to see the resolution for the family. 

The storyline briefly shined a light on the struggles of single mothers who have to work crazy hours to support their families and who can’t afford a sitter. Though I still wish there was more emphasis on how society as a whole could support moms in need so that they don’t have to get penalized by the government for doing their best. Most moms would rather not leave their children home alone but simply don’t have a choice. 

Things also aren’t looking great for Natalie Manning. 

Dr. Halstead was alerted to the missing trial drugs as they were never sent back, and when Natalie began asking too many questions, he likely figured out that she had something to do with their disappearance. Natbasically blew her own cover.

Chicago Med Review What a Tangled Web We Weave Season 6 Episode 13

CHICAGO MED — “What A Tangle Web We Weave” Episode 613 — Pictured: Torrey DeVitto as Natalie Manning — (Photo by: Adrian S Burrows Sr./NBC)

Why else would she ask about a random side-effect unless she had come in contact with a patient exhibiting the side-effect? 

Obviously, this isn’t just bad for Natalie, it’s also terrible for Will because, as he noted, he’s responsible for the drugs. And he’s already on Sabine’s hit list. 

I’m also surprised that Natalie thought that there would be no repercussions for her actions. 

How does a doctor simply believe that no one is going to care if pills go missing? If they weren’t sent back then there’s a huge likelihood that they got into the wrong hands. 

And since they’re part of a trial, the patient taking the drugs needs to be constantly monitored and assessed. 

In trying to help her mother, Natalie may have just made things worse, especially if Carol begins to display concerning symptoms. A persistent cough might only be the beginning.

Natalie realized that the situation was getting out of hand, so when Crockett began asking for her to be honest about what was going on, she decided to break up with him. 

I’ve said this in previous reviews, but I’ll say it again — why can’t the writers just allow for one healthy relationship? Why does every relationship need to be sabotaged?

In this case, Natalie broke up with Crockett to protect him otherwise he’d be considered an accomplice if she told him the truth, but it still sucks. 

He opened up to her, he was honest with her about his past and his trauma, and it ended with her “needing space” and breaking his heart! 

Honestly, no one was making sound decisions, which I guess made the title of the episode “What a Tangled Web We Weave” all the more fitting. 

Maggie volunteered at a college fair because she knew it would allow her to meet Vanessa, the daughter she gave up for adoption. 

The worst/best part of the situation was that Vanessa was a delight. 

Maggie should be proud that her daughter is a bright young woman that’s pursuing a medical degree. But it’s also a heartbreaking realization that you missed out on so many crucial moments in this girl’s life. 

Maggie tried to think that it was a sign that they were both in the same field, but I think that’s just her way of trying to find common ground with her daughter and hoping she subconsciously had some influence on her life.

And while it’s great that she got to meet her, it’s a betrayal of trust and one that could potentially backfire, especially as Maggie vouched for Vanessa to get a residency at Gaffney. 

You know Vanessa is going to come work at Med and Maggie will get attached.

She can’t hide her identity forever. If she’s going to be in Vanessa’s life, she has to be transparent about who she is. 

Dr. Archer continues to be absolutely terrible, and I can’t figure out his character at all.

What’s his deal?

We know he suffers from PTSD and refused to seek out therapy with Dr. Charles despite Choi’s orders, but now he’s got some beef with April for no apparent reason. 

He tried to throw April under the bus after Choi supported her treatment suggestion. It felt as though he was trying to sabotage her by forcing her to perform a procedure even as she voiced her discomfort. 

Then, when she confronted him about it, he tried to turn it around on her and blamed it on her lack of confidence. What the hell?

It didn’t really track considering he raved about how brilliant she was and offered to vouch for her to a medical director of a school. 

It was also strange that he focused on April still being close friends with her ex as if that somehow played a role in her career. 

Is he jealous? Is he smitten with April? Is he intimated? Does he want her to fail or succeed? I can’t really tell what’s going on here. 

What did you think of the episode? What’s your take on Dr. Archer? I can’t be the only one who thinks he’s been shady ever since he got hired.

Do you think Manning is going to be exposed? Is Will going to pay the ultimate price?

Will Carol’s condition worsen because of the medication?

Share your thoughts with us in the comments below! 


Continue Reading

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Some Things Are Worth the Risk (6×12)

Published

on

Chicago Med Some Things Are Worth The Risk Season 6 Episode 12

The medical staff at Med took some big risks on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 12, but will they come back to bite them?

If you were confused with the episode kicking off with Halstead and Virani in bed together, you’re not alone.

I definitely thought I overlooked something or that it was part of Halstead’s dream. 

Turns out, these two are in a romantic relationship now and all the love-triangle stuff between her, Halstead, and Choi is done and over with? I guess.

It seemed rushed, but I guess the point was that it would make things much more complicated for them when Halstead finally confessed to unblinding a patient from their trial. 

The confession came as Halstead asked Virani to make an exception and allow Manning’s mom, whose heart failure is getting progressively worse, into the now-closed trial. 

In other words, he shot down any chance of actually convincing her, but are we surprised? This is Halstead we’re talking about — he rarely thinks things through. 

There’s an uncomfortable tension between the two of them now since he broke the basic rule of clinical trials and put both of their jobs in jeopardy. 

During the fancy dinner, when Halstead was propositioned to leave the ED and pursue clinical trials full-time, Virani tried to shut it down, however, he seemed to say he’d seriously consider it just to spite her. 

I can’t see Halstead ever leaving his gig at the ED. 

Will Virani threaten to expose him/turn him in if he tries to accept the position?

Things are about to get even worse for Halstead if anyone finds out that Manning’s mother has the drugs.

He wasn’t involved since Manning stole the clinical trial drugs from a patient who passed away in a tragic accident. She’s desperate to save her mother, and since her mother is refusing any other surgery, she decided to take a gamble and grab the drugs, which is highly illegal.

My guess is that her mother wouldn’t have qualified for the trial anyway, and after taking the pills, she’ll have some kind of reaction to them, which will reveal what she did. 

And, of course, Halstead’s name is on the bottle, so it’ll look like he helped his ex-girlfriend steal them. 

It’s very messy and careless! Since being paired up with Crockett, Manning’s character has made significant progress, so this is disappointing.

Crockett and April dealt with a patient who tested COVID-positive and continued to suffer from symptoms months later. 

After a series of tests, April chalked it up to residue anxiety. When it ended up being endometriosis in the lungs, she felt pretty terrible about her diagnosis, yet Crockett assured her that the fact that she was basing it on something she’d experienced previously meant she had better instincts than some resident doctors. 

Will this finally convince April to go back to school and become a doctor?

Crockett and April meshed well, and it’s always nice when the series allows for some fresh pairings. 

In a little mini-Chicago Fire crossover, Dr. Choi and Dean responded to a call in the field to save a man who was stuck under debris following a house demo. 

It’s been a few episodes since we’ve seen Dean, so I’m glad the series didn’t forget about him. 

Choi realized that Dean still suffers from PTSD from his time in Afghanistan. Not only did the ride in the ambulance bring up those repressed feelings, but the moment a gang fight broke out while they were trying to save a man’s life and gunshots were heard, Dean completely shut down. 

Chicago Med Some Things Are Worth The Risk Season 6 Episode 12

CHICAGO MED — “Some Things Are Worth The Risk” Episode 612 — Pictured: (l-r) Brian Tee as Ethan Choi, Hanako Greensmith as Violet — (Photo by: Adrian S. Burrows Sr./NBC)

It’s completely reasonable that Choi would want Dean to speak to Dr. Charles and get some help. 

They were in a life-or-death situation and he had to keep Dean calm instead of giving the patient his full focus. 

Next time there’s a similar situation, Choi wants to know that he can count on Dean to keep calm and collected. 

The scene also emphasized the importance of getting mental health help when it’s necessary. As he pointed out, if Dean broke a body part, he’d seek medical attention and the same should happen with his PTSD. 

Sadly, Dean pretended to text Dr. Charles and deleted the message the moment Choi wasn’t looking. 

Does he think that Choi won’t find out? He’s the Head of Emergency Medicine and good friends/colleagues with Charles!

For now, Charles has his own issues with the re-emergence of Ramona. You knew she was going to pop back up eventually.

When she saw Charles with his daughter, Anna, she was clearly triggered, which caused her to come to the hospital throwing up after ingesting some kind of chemical. 

There was no way Ramona was going to tell the doctors what she took, but by allowing her to see Dr. Charles in order to treat her, they were kind of rewarding her reckless behavior. 

Still, Dr. Charles did make some headway with her when he pried about her relationship with her father. 

None of it rubbed me the right way. Ramona seemed all too obsessed with her dad, and after his passing, she transferred that obsession onto any male doctor that gave her attention.

She explained that he liked her when she was younger, but when she got older, she no longer fulfilled his needs, which again, does not sit well with me. 

If her father was sexually abusing her, it would explain her current obsessions and why she does what she does to get attention.

Before Dr. Charles could really get down to the root of the problem, he was pulled away by his daughter, Anna. In that time, Ramona disappeared, and Anna felt pretty guilty afterward. 

I have this terrible feeling that Ramona will somehow find her way to Dr. Charles’ house and come after Anna. 

What did you think of the episode? Who was more out of line — Halstead, Manning, or Dean?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!


Continue Reading

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Letting Go Only to Come Together (6×11)

Published

on

Chicago Med Review Letting Go Only To Come Together Season 6 Episode 11

Sometimes the doctors at Chicago Med have to deal with cases that require a little extra brainpower.

Both Dr. Choi and Dr. Virani and Dr. Manning and Crockett teamed up to solve medical mysteries. 

Choi treated a 21-year-old pro tennis player who got hit in the chest. However, his irregular heartbeat and frequent nosebleeds didn’t make sense for someone in good health.

When he wasn’t able to figure out the cause of Montez’s condition, Choi reluctantly accepted help from Dr. Virani, who he was pushing away after noticing her little fling with Halstead.

Virani proved to be useful as together, they were able to determine that the situation wasn’t related to the heart and was actually stemming from Montez’s lung condition. 

Virani and Choi celebrated the win by playing a game of chess together, which made Halstead pretty jealous. 

It seems as though Virani is fully aware that both men are interested in her, but it also doesn’t seem like she’s interested in either of them in a romantic way. 

The two of them have butted heads professionally for years and now, they’re competing for the attention of the same woman.

Wouldn’t it be hilarious if Virani was just a friendly person and already had a significant other?

We don’t know much about her, so it’s totally possible! 

Crockett and Manning’s relationship is heating up. He’s over for family dinner, bonding with Nat’s mom, and allegedly met Owen!

And the duo even exchanged “I love you’s.” Crockett’s vulnerability is the highlight of the season!

Manning’s relationships have always been pretty toxic and affected her personal and professional life, but with Crockett, she’s excelling in both departments. 

Their romance is budding and they work really well together!

They rarely disagree on a course of treatment, even when presented with a tough-to-crack case like Lisa’s. 

Lisa came in with a stack of medical records surrounding her abdominal pain that no other doctor was able to diagnose. 

But nothing is impossible for Natalie and Crockett. Not only did they figure out the issue, but they also found a solution that finally eliminated her pain.

These two are like the Superman and Lois Lane of Med. 

I wasn’t entirely sure what the deal was with Manning’s mother. She seemed a little uncomfortable with Crockett’s religion, but then she sent him a Persian gift basket, which almost seemed like a peace offering. 

Was this simply a tool to give us more background on Crockett? Will it come into play if they eventually decide to get married?

I truly hope Manning’s mother doesn’t dismiss him because of his beliefs and culture! 

Halstead teamed up with Dr. Charles to treat a patient who was experiencing seizures and seeing visions of his late wife. 

The man seemed aware that his wife was dead, but that didn’t stop him from finding comfort in her presence. 

Eventually, it was revealed that a tumor was causing his ghostly visions. Dr. Charles, who knows a thing or two about losing a spouse, was able to successfully convince the man to get the surgery even if it meant he wouldn’t have his wife around anymore. 

Grief and loss as so powerful.

Sharon Goodwin put out a new set of rules after her son, Michael, overstepped in his pharma position, which didn’t sit well with the COO Gwen Garrett.

It’s nice to know Goodwin and Garrett still don’t get along!

Goodwin was straddling the line between protecting the hospital and her son. Her loyalties were getting a bit murky, so it was a relief when Michael announced he was leaving his job at Med. 

I’d hardly call this a huge loss as the series failed to find a compelling way to work Michael into the narrative.

And then there was the tension between Lanik and April. Honestly, Lanik is such a pompous ass.

Even if April was in the wrong, I’m never excited when there’s a storyline that includes him because of his nasty attitude. 

After seeing potential in April, he sent her to work the COVID ICU unit, which was a welcome change of pace for her. 

April’s been drawn to the COVID unit since the onset of the pandemic, so it was nice to see her back in her element. 

And I love that the series showcased that nurses have to deal with patients who are literally dying from the disease and remain in denial about it. 

As she was gasping for air, Mrs. Caine continued pushing the narrative that COVID-19 isn’t real. 

People can have their beliefs — it’s not as serious, mask mandates are a joke, vaccines aren’t necessary — but it’s ignorant to say it isn’t real when people are dying daily! 

Still, since April knew she wasn’t going to change Mrs. Caine’s mind, she went along with it to convince her to accept help. 

And when Mrs. Caine lost consciousness and April couldn’t reach Lanik, she decided to push meds without a doctor’s approval, which is a big no-no.

Here’s the thing, though… are we shocked? Are we surprised?

Absolutely not.

April has a tendency to cross lines and hope for the best largely because Choi has always given her a pass and looked the other way. 

However, since they aren’t together anymore, this could really come back to bite her. 

She may have saved a life, but in the process, she infuriated a doctor who isn’t the most pleasant to work with. 

Will she finally face the consequences of her actions?

What did you think of Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 11? Let us know in the comments below


Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending