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Chicago Med Review Better is the New Enemy of Good Season 6 Episode 7 Chicago Med Review Better is the New Enemy of Good Season 6 Episode 7

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Choi and Halstead Never Learn (6×07)

CHICAGO MED -- "Better Is The New Enemy Of Good" Episode 607 -- Pictured: (l-r) Yaya DeCosta as April Sexton, Nick Gehlfuss as Dr. Will Halstead -- (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

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Dr. Choi and Dr. Halstead simply never learn. 

On Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 7, they both broke hospital protocol (nothing new for them) and found every way to justify their actions. 

When Vera, the first patient Halstead enrolled in his experimental clinical drug trial, came in experiencing strange symptoms, the immediate assumption was that medication was to blame.

However, Dr. Halstead didn’t want to unbind Vera to see if she was on the drug or a placebo, nor did he want to report the situation to Kender’s medical board without checking off all the other boxes first because he knew that would mean they’d pull the drug trial completely. 

While it seemed like Halstead cared more about the trial initially, he made it clear that he didn’t want to hurt all the other patients currently benefitting from the drug, which was fair.

When they kept mentioning how great Mr. Booker was doing because of the trial, I was convinced he would waltz into the ED halfway through the episode experiencing similar symptoms. 

But since no one else in the trial had these responses, Halstead was led to believe it was something entirely unrelated. 

To be absolutely sure that he could rule out the medication, Halstead went behind Sabeena and the company’s back to unbind Vera, which is unethical. 

Of course, when Halstead figured out that Vera’s symptoms were caused by a tumor that was pressing on Vera’s pituitary gland, he figured that his actions didn’t really matter because the end-result protected the trial. 

But the simple fact that he almost came clean to Sabeena means that he’s aware, even subconsciously, that his behavior is shady. 

He broke her trust, and he knew that telling her would ruin their working relationship and potential future relationship. 

Sabeena would never trust Halstead if she knew what he did, but now that he asked her out, it’ll be even worse if she finds out later on when they’ve grown closer in their personal lives.

Halstead can’t ever get it right. 

The worst part is that he roped April into it and now, she’s forced to keep this secret.

Dr. Choi was equally as bad because he came into work after having his gallbladder removed that very morning. Doctors, aka the people who are supposed to know better, are their own worst enemies sometimes!

After collapsing in the middle of his own ED, Choi explained that he didn’t want to shirk his responsibilities, but truthfully, he put himself and his colleagues in danger. 

With a fever of 102,  there was no way he was making sound decisions or performing his best. It would have been better for everyone if he simply took the time to heal. 

The role has taken quite a toll on him, and I thought that his aches and fever were due to exhaustion, which would have jived with the previous storyline introduced on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 6 where he barely left the hospital and drank way too much coffee in order to stay awake.

The most interesting part of Choi’s situation was that he wasn’t just trying to do a good job like he told himself and others. Instead, he was trying to prove himself just like Dr. Charles’ patient Dr. Cohen. 

Since taking on the role of Chief, Choi seems to have Imposter Syndrome. He’s qualified, he’s dedicated, he does a good job, but he constantly feels inadequate, so he pushes himself to do more and do better, which ultimately ends up in burnout. 

Thankfully, his case wasn’t as bad as Dr. Cohen’s, who was an example of a worst-case scenario. The man was having delusions and competing with a dead guy simply to prove he was the best and deserved his spot in the department.

It’s illuminating to see the stock and value we put into careers in this country; so many people turn into workaholics because without a successful career they deem themselves worthless.

Where do we draw the line? When do we realize we shouldn’t value ourselves based on the jobs we have?

Crockett’s storyline continues to be heartbreaking. As he deals with cancer patient after cancer patient, it’s become clear that he has to finally come to terms with the past, which he’s been putting off and internalizing all this time.

Thankfully, he has Natalie. And she has him. 

You know, I think Natalie got it right this time. They not only make a great team, but they’re such a great couple. 

Natalie has been supportive from the beginning and never pushed him to share his story until he was ready. 

Crockett was initially standoffish and very protective about his past, but he’s since opened up to the point where he allowed her to be by his side when he opened the box of his daughter’s belongings. It was a huge and touching moment. 

There’s never going to be a time where it’s easy for Crockett to deal with cancer cases, especially malignant ones that have metastasized and come with a timeline.

Breaking the news to patients is never easy, and standing by as a witness to a rushed wedding isn’t either because he of all people knows the pain and suffering that will follow in a few months to a year. 

Sharon Goodwin dealt with her son, who she felt overstepped in the OR by trying to upsell medical parts. It was a bland storyline, and at this point, I don’t think Chicago Med really knows what to do with Michael’s character.

As for Maggie, she continues to get pushed down every time she tries to pick herself back up. After successfully finding Auggie a liver donor, she and Ben filed to officially adopt the young boy, who is already calling them “mom and dad.”

Everything was perfect, but then the ancestry site she used hoping to find a match for Auggie turned up a brother and the adoptive parents reached out to see if the boys could meet. 

While it’s great that Auggie has a biological family member, it’s obviously scary for Maggie because there’s a chance that Kenshaw’s parents will want to adopt Auggie or that Auggie will want to live with his brother. And I don’t know much about the adoption system, but is it possible they’d want to place Auggie with his brother?

I truly hope that isn’t the case because Maggie’s new family makes my heart melt every time they’re on the screen. They belong together. 

What do you think will happen with Auggie?

What did you think of the episode? Sound off in the comments section below! 


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season Premiere Review – Out With the Old, In With the New (7×01)

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Chicago Med Season 7 Premiere Review You Can't Always Trust What You See

Something felt off about the season 7 premiere of Chicago Med

It wasn’t just the fact that Gaffney welcomed a slew of new faces,  but more so that the time jump was so forced as it abruptly sent Natalie packing and reinstated Will as a doctor. 

I know that the series tried their best to give fans closure following Torrey Devito’s departure, but since she already agreed to an appearance, couldn’t they have at least made the most of those few minutes of screentime?

Where was she going? Did it have something to do with her mother? And why was Will the one seeing her off? Is it because he covered for her and the stolen pills? The whole scene, much like her exit, felt rushed. 

After her exit, Will decided to ask Goodwin for a second chance since Nat confessed to stealing the trial meds, and Goodwin agreed under the condition that he’d basically become a mole and corner the new doctor, Matt Cooper (Michael Rady), for upselling an unnecessarily expensive and dangerous device called the Vask Comp in order to receive kickbacks. 

It definitely sounds like Goodwin is asking Halstead to just take a plunge into boiling hot water here, but what choice does he have? If he wants his old job back, he has to prove his loyalty. 

And, in a way, the good outweighs the bad as the hope is that his intel will help them pull a potentially dangerous device off the market. 

But why Will? Aside from the fact that he always makes absolutely nonsensical choices, he is said to have a past with Cooper, who used to date his cousin. 

There’s definitely some tension between Cooper and Halstead from the getgo when the latter propositions catching up over drinks. There’s also a weird line about Cooper being a “good boy” in his marriage, which alludes to the fact that he likely cheated on Halstead’s cousin.

And considering that he’s flirting with the lady working the counter, I’d say he isn’t as reformed as he’d like people to believe.

Just what we need — another frenemy for Halstead!

The fallout of the Kinder trial has really derailed his career, and his return to the ED isn’t necessarily welcomed with open arms, particularly by Crockett, another doctor who hasn’t seen eye-to-eye with Will in the past. 

Crockett was forced to rely on his former colleague when he accepted a former Kinder trial patient whose filed was locked. Halstead was the only person who had any insight into the patient’s history, but even when he tried to advise, Crockett hesitated to believe him and went with his gut instead. 

It’s a valid reaction considering Halstead’s murky past, but it was also a battle of the egos. 

This time, however, Halstead was right. 

And while Crockett’s ego may have been bruised, he was able to own up to his mistake. Call me crazy, but I think these two just might become friends after all. 

The biggest obstacle standing in the way of their friendship was Natalie, and since she left both of them in her dust, there’s really no reason to continue this feud. 

I’m willing to bet that if they work together, they can do great things. 

Cooper wasn’t nearly as problematic as Dr. Asher, who somehow, despite crossing every single doctor at Gaffney, snagged the Chief of ED position after Ethan’s shooting. 

Not only are Nat and April gone, but Ethan’s absence from the premiere was reduced to a one-liner about how he’s in rehab recovering.

I was kind of hoping Asher wasn’t going to stick around, but with all the recent departures, Med kind of needs him. 

His disdain for Dr. Charles and the field of psychology, in general, was at an all-time high.  Asher is a vet, so his approach to mental health is rather old school. He doesn’t really respect any Dr. Charles’ calls, particularly when they interfere with his ability to treat a patient. Asher continued to not be impressed that Charles indulged a patient’s fantasies or delusions, though it’s clear he also doesn’t really understand the science behind psychology. 

At the kickstart of the episode, they both made snarky comments to each other about the mishandling of Neil’s case, the man who believed he was living in a simulation and shot Ethan after Asher treated him against his will. The tension between them amplified when Asher treated two identical twins, one of whom needed her ovary removed. Since Jemma and Emma grew up without developing a sense of identity, they were convinced they had to do everything together in order to remain “one person.” Thus, the healthy twin also wanted Asher to remove her ovary, which was obviously unethical. 

Chicago Med Season 7 Premiere Review You Can't Always Trust What You See

CHICAGO MED — “You Can’t Always Trust What You See” Episode 701 — Pictured: (l-r) Kristin Hager as Dr. Stevie Hammer — (Photo by: George Burns Jr/NBC)

The whole relationship between the twins was borderline disturbing, and I kind of wish the series tapped into that more. However, I was impressed that Charles found a way to convince them to go through with the life-saving procedure without dismissing their feelings or beliefs. 

But despite emphasizing that he’s never seen a case quite like this one in his 40 years on the job, he probably should’ve anticipated the old switcheroo. 

Maybe Asher and Charkes will find a way to put their difference aside and learn from each other?

In addition to Cooper, there were two new faces making the rounds at Gaffney: Dylan Scott (Guy Lockard) and Stevie Hammer (Kristen Hager). 

Scott’s a former cop-turned-doctor who loves to share that tidbit with his patients, including a young boy who was bitten by a rattlesnake as part of a gang initiation. My guess is there’s going to be some tie-in to Chicago PD at some point as he told Will that he knew his brother Jay Halstead. 

Hammer, on the other hand, reminds me of Dr. Elsa Curry at times. She’s an emergency room attending that seems very perceptive. 

She also has a connection to Halstead as they attended med school together, so you can probably tack her onto his long list of love interests. Sparks will fly sooner rather than later, I’m sure. 

And since Halstead is a sucker for taking on his romantic partner’s burdens, it won’t be long before he gets involved with trying to help her homeless mother.

Neither of these characters have hooked me just yet, nor are they filling the Natalie and April-sized voids, but I’m not writing them off either. 

Scott, in particular, has the ability to offer a unique perspective as there hasn’t been a doctor that has also been on the other side of the coin and worked the streets of Chicago. 

Maggie’s storyline with her daughter, Taylor, is going to be a bigger focus this season. If I were to put my money on it, they’ll have a decent relationship by the time the season is over.

Though, I’m glad that Maggie is pulling back and following Taylor’s lead on this. Despite wanting to do what was best for Taylor, it was pretty manipulative of Maggie to get close to her daughter and withhold the truth about her identity. 

Taylor deserves all the space she needs, and my hope is that the series doesn’t force this storyline. 

Taylor can be curious about her mother while also resenting her for how she’s handled things up until now. And it’s not a surprise that she wants to focus on her career and not have this secret overshadow all the work that she’s doing. 

What did you think of the Chicago Med Season 7 premiere?

Did you find it struggled to find its footing with the new characters or did it make you excited for what’s to come this season?

Sound off in the comments below!


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Will and Natalie Come Clean (6×15)

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Chicago Med Review Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies Season 6 Episode 15

The secrets and lies finally caught up with Will and Natalie on Chicago Med

In the penultimate episode of the season, Natalie’s mother was rushed to Gaffney with liver failure, which both doctors deduced was a symptom of the Kinder trial drugs they’ve been giving her. 

Natalie became consumed with guilt over giving her mom the pills and decided she was going to tell Sabeena Virani the truth about what she did. Before she could get to it, however, Will came clean.

And Sabeena did not take it very well. It’s understandable since Will promised he wouldn’t do anything like this again, and she was on the brink of forgiving him and giving him another chance. 

Not only was it a breach of her trust, but it could also cost her and Will their jobs.

And worst of all, it also compromised the integrity of the trial, which near the end of getting all necessary approvals.

It’s one thing for Natalie to have stolen the pills to help her mom, but it’s another for Will to help her cover it up and get more pills while knowing how much was on the line.

His actions directly affected so many people who could’ve benefitted from the medication.

Obviously, Will didn’t want Natalie to go down for what she did, so he took the blame instead, which could cost him his job and definitely cost him any chance of rekindling his romance with Sabeena. 

I guess it goes to show that Natalie still means a great deal to him. 

However, with Torrey DeVitto not returning for the seventh season, I wonder if she’ll find out Will took the blame and come clean instead. I don’t see her as the type of person to let someone else clean up her messes. 

And if her mother doesn’t survive, she’d be so overcome with guilt that she’d likely confess and lose her medical license, which is also a great way to write her off the show. It’s the only storyline that makes sense. 

Natalie also told Crockett the truth about what she did after he confronted her about whether or not she and Will are getting back together.

Crockett was definitely surprised by what she had done, but he was empathetic after seeing how remorseful she was. 

I’m really digging this relationship between Natalie and Crockett, so it’s unfortunate that we won’t get to see it progress past this season.

How do you think they’re going to leave things off?

Chicago Med Review Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies Season 6 Episode 15

CHICAGO MED — “Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies” Episode 615 — Pictured: (l-r) Dominic Rains as Crockett Marcel, Yaya DaCosta as April Sexton — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

Crockett was being really hard on himself after his lung transplant patient came into the ED with pneumonia. 

Since there was no reasonable cause for the illness just 8 days after surgery, Crockett blamed it on surgeon error. 

Thankfully, April went against his wishes and tested the lung for COVID. Sure enough, her gut was right and the lung was infected pre-transplant clearing Crockett of any wrongdoing. 

Once they were able to figure out what led to the illness, Crockett successfully performed a risky surgery that gave James another shot at life. 

Yaya DaCosta, who plays April, is also leaving the show, and I’m guessing that her character exit will have something to do with her decision to go back to nursing school. 

Both of the ladies will be missed around these ED halls, that’s for sure! 

Dr. Choi and Dr. Asher dealt with an 18-year-old patient who was refusing brain surgery to remove a tumor, which was the only course of treatment to save her life.

It led to a bit of an altercation between Choi and Asher as the former respected the girl’s decision, while the latter convinced her parents to apply for power of attorney and make the decision for her in the case that she went unconscious. 

I know Asher wants what’s best for patients, but he’s really not into allowing people to make their own choices.

It’s hard to empathize with him and his war stories when all we’ve seen is his overbearing, controlling, and judgemental behavior.

Asher ended up being able to convince the woman to get the surgery with by sharing a relatable story (that wasn’t even about his time serving), but again, I just don’t trust him or think he has good intentions. 

He may not have sedated this girl to get her into treatment, but we know he’s done it before. 

And that’s in addition to several other issues that have come up during his short tenure. 

Ms. Goodwin exclaimed that he may be the best man for the job, but she hasn’t seen what we have.

Also, does anyone else get the feeling that he’s lying about going to therapy just to get Choi off of his back?

It was Vanessa’s last day in the ED — can you say time jump? — and Maggie was contemplating telling her the truth. 

As Goodwin put it, there’s no going back from that, so it was a decision that shouldn’t have been made lightly or without Vanessa’s best interests at heart. 

For some reason, Vanessa decided to bring her parents to the ED on one of her last days to give them a tour, and upon meeting her parents, Maggie found herself conflicted again.

It doesn’t seem like Vanessa knows she’s adopted, so telling her the truth would not only blow up her life but also her family’s life. And they seem like such a sweet family!

Maybe it’s comforting to know that Vanessa has good parents that love her and are proud of her. 

At this point, the only reason Maggie would decide to tell Vanessa is for selfish reasons. 

However, there wouldn’t be any drama if she didn’t tell her, and if Vanessa gets a full-time job in the ED (which you know she will), Maggie will be even more tempted. 

I’m still of the mindset that telling Vanessa is a recipe for disaster as she will feel betrayed by Maggie. 

And speaking of disasters, Ramona’s obsession with Dr. Charles could’ve gone terribly wrong at any moment, but instead, Chicago Med took a different approach and gave us a really compelling storyline with a promising resolution. 

Ramona arrived at Gaffney to “hang out” with Dr. Charles, but it seemed like yet another cry for help. 

Except that she wasn’t aware she wanted help in the first place, so when Dr. Charles tried to get her to open up, she admitted that her father molested her and then bolted. 

Eventually, he found her contemplating suicide on the hospital rooftop. 

I know I’ve said this before in a review from a previous season, but why are patients even allowed up there? This isn’t the first suicide attempt. Access should be restricted!

Dr. Charles was able to talk Ramona down, who admitted she just wanted a normal life.

In the end, he took her to a facility that specializes in sexual assault, and it was the first time Ramona felt seen, heard, and taken care of. 

The storyline started off with Ramona acting kind of crazy and ended up with a woman who acknowledged her past trauma, how it affected her in the present, and the desire to get the necessary help. 

Imagine that… a storyline that sheds light on the importance of mental health — what a win!

What did you think of the episode?

What will happen to Will and Natalie? Is Dr. Asher growing on you? And should Maggie come clean to Vanessa?


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Chicago P.D

Here’s When Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD Will Air Season Finales in 2021

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One Chicago promo ahead of November 11 premiere

It’s hard to believe that it’s almost finale time for the #OneChicago shows on NBC.

Due to production delays brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Chicago Med, Chicago PD, and Chicago Fire got off to a late start in mid-November (instead of the usual mid-September premiere), but that pandemic hasn’t made a huge impact on the quality of the episodes. 

In fact, the shows have been delivering some of their strongest episodes to date! (You can check out Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD reviews now!)

However, with shorter seasons on tap, the schedule has been pretty wonky and consisted of several breaks in between, so we don’t blame you if you’re having trouble keeping up. That’s why we’re here to clue you in. 

NBC announced that the shows will officially conclude on Wednesday, May 26, 2021, which would align with their pre-COVID finales even if the episode count is a bit shorter than in the year prior. 


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