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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Halstead Proves He’s Incapable of Making a Good Decision to Save His Life (5×14)

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Is Will Halstead capable of making good decisions?

One of the qualifications of being a doctor is making medically sound decisions on behalf of your patients, and despite Halstead’s best attempts, you have to question where his head’s at during that conversation with Dr. Asher.

Will started off on the right foot by clearing the air with Asher, encouraging her to “get clean,” and even suggesting he would meet her for a Narcotic’s Annonymous meeting in the morning.

My fear was that Asher would leave the clinic and try to score somewhere else, which didn’t happen, but she ditched the meeting and gave Will a mouthy response about stalking her. The mood swings are understandable, so we will forgive her.

Eventually, Will surmised that he cannot stand by and watch Asher take patients while suffering from addiction so he terminated his position at the safe injection site mainly to protect them from her retaliation and arranged a meeting with her.

So far, so good.

Here’s where things hit a bit of a snag when it came to Will’s decision making.

For starters, he offered to meet Asher at a bar. Who brings an addict to a bar? Really, Will?

He then proceeded to tell Asher his plan — you turn yourself in or I will — and let her know that he’s not with the clinic anymore (though, she said she would never actually report him).

Asher lied to Will before after promising that she’d meet him at a meeting, so what makes Will so confident she will hold up her end of the deal here and turn herself in the next morning? And even so, telling the truth doesn’t cure someone’s addiction — it’s a long road.

From here it just gets progressively worse. Asher seems to be trying to manipulate him by preying on his feelings and acting touched that he cares.

“I care,” Will flirtingly tells her. Hands touch, fingers collide, and she invites him back to her place to which Halstead smiles and nods. Lord…

In some ways, Asher is kind of a patient now that he’s agreeing to help. Halstead exhibited questionable judgment when he decided to get involved with someone in a fragile mental state and someone on the verge of losing her license because he’s pushing her into a corner.

There are a few outcomes here including Asher getting emotionally attached, Asher dragging him down with him, or Asher killing him. She seems nice, sure, but she could kill him to protect her secret. It may be extreme, but we’ve seen crazier things on this show.

So, I beg you, Halstead, do not accept that invitation. It’s incredibly reckless to start a relationship with someone you barely know, who has a drug problem and doesn’t seem to want to get help on her own. She also threatened his career.

It’s noble of him to want to help someone get clean, but that’s where he needs to draw the line. It sounds like a bad movie, and Halstead needs to know that you cannot change a person that doesn’t want to be changed.

April and Ethan dealt with a newlywed couple whose honeymoon phase even got them turned on in the ED.

It’s unclear why anyone would want to get it on in a place filled with bacteria, but more power to them.

Their love story took a wrong turn when it was revealed that the woman’s rash was being caused by an allergic reaction to her husband’s sperm. I didn’t know that was possible, but you learn something new every day.

The couple’s attractiveness towards each other made April realize that she and Ethan haven’t been spontaneously intimate at all through this IVF phase, and despite his best efforts, April’s guilt serving as a bit of a block.

April’s not over Crockett as evidenced in the elevator. She so badly wants to be over him, but she tenses up every time she’s near him because that sexual energy is too much to handle. I keep saying it, but I’ll say it again, April needs to be honest with herself, come clean about her feelings, and tell Ethan the truth. Stop torturing yourself, girl.

Crockett is quickly becoming my favorite character on the series next to Dr. Curry!

There is this airiness and easiness about him that’s almost foreign in the ED. He has never once wavered on his beliefs and has always suggested that the next of kin make the decision about a patient’s health.

He doesn’t let his personal beliefs or his wants and needs as a human or surgeon cloud his judgment. He looks at facts and makes morally sound decisions, and when things don’t’ go his way, he usually doesn’t have to make some lengthy argument about why they should have. He accepts what’s happening and then makes a simple, subtle comment that puts into perspective why his decision was his decision.

That happened when he went head-to-head with Natalie about whether or not to let Kim, a car crash victim, make a medical decision about her husband.

Natalie noticed Kim was a victim of abuse and didn’t want her to make a decision she would regret, but Crockett argued that despite what happened in their private life, she was still the next of kin and those rights belonged to her.

The most frustrating part about Natalie’s argument is that she had no confirmation Kim was an abuse victim. She had bruises that aligned with the symptoms of abuse, but nothing else to go off of. What if Kim was being abused by a lover?

Eventually, the Ethics Committee voted that Kim should be stripped of decision rights and that her husband should get his leg amputated.

Kim was already a mess when she came into the hospital but she really lost it after that as she basically melted down about what her husband would do to her if he woke up without a leg and it was all her fault.

Natalie offered to “help,” but Kim pulled the plug and murdered her husband when no one was around.

As Crockett put it: an abuse victim went to jail and that didn’t seem like the right outcome.

I’d have to agree. There’s what you should do based on the book and there’s what you should do based on the case.

Kim was making a decision for her safety, and when that was taken from her, she went to the extremes. When people are left without a choice, they’re willing to go far.

And I can’t fault her for what she did. No one understands the level of personal hell and fear you live in each day. For all we know, she crashed the car on purpose.

If Natalie had just left it alone, Kim would have been free from her demons.

Natalie has always had an ego complex that reared its ugly head mainly when she was with arguing with Will over who was right. With Crockett, she gets put in her place because she understands that her outcome may not have been the right one.

Curry is my second favorite because she’s gone from this book-heavy intern to someone who trusts her own medical judgment and is learning to speak up for herself.

She still makes plenty of missteps since she’s learning, but she’s a fun character to bring into Dr. Charles’ realm because she keeps him on his toes.

The case, in particular, was unlike anything we’ve ever seen since the young boy was suffering from a rare condition.

If not for Curry’s inquisitiveness, the boy’s parents would have never known he was misdiagnosed. They would go on thinking he was in a vegetative state when in reality he was suffering from catatonia, which put his body into a state of shock caused by the paralyzing fear of his father’s job.

It was a heartbreaking situation as the father wanted so badly to be with his son but knew he had to separate himself to give him his best chance, but at least they were on a path of healing.

That’s all anyone can really ask for after leaving a hospital.

What did you think of Chicago Med? Is Halstead making a mistake if he goes to Asher’s place and hooks up with her?

Are Natalie and Crockett going to become an item? Will we ever learn about his past?

Will April come clean to Ethan?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Paging the New Chief of the ED, Ethan Choi (6×02)

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Chicago Med Those Things Hidden In Plain Sight Season 6 Episode 2

Chicago Med delivered its final powerful episode of 2020. 

That’s right, the Dick Wolf series is following in the footsteps of This Is Us and returning in the new year on January 6, 2021.

“Those Things Hidden in Plain Sight” once again tackled COVID without overwhelming viewers. Now, if you’re one of those people who doesn’t want to see the pandemic playing out on your TV screen, you’re going to have to bite the bullet because the series doesn’t seem like it’s letting up on COVID-related storylines just yet. 

However, to make up for it, it’s also offering other cases and escalating tensions between characters, so there’s still something to look forward to. 

April remained in the COVID unit, and though her heart is in this fight, she’s learning that it’s a losing battle. 

She did her best to care for Yesenia, a minor, but she didn’t manage to reunite her with her mother even after getting permission from Choi. 

Not long after Yesenia went into respiratory failure, Alejandra was brought in after testing positive for COVID. It’s unclear if both these women, who only had each other, will lose their battles with the novel virus or if we’ll see them again, but it’s a situation that April is seeing all too often. 

People come into the hospital hoping that they’ll be healed, but they reach a point where there’s nothing else doctors and nurses can do for them.

“It’s never enough,” a defeated April told Choi, which seems to be a sentiment shared by all of those working on COVID’s frontlines currently as cases surge. 

Ethan Choi leveled up as he accepted the position of Chief of ED following Lanik’s departure (can’t say that he’ll be missed). 

This obviously didn’t sit well with Will Halstead, who was misguided in his thinking that he somehow deserved this because he’d been at Med longer than Choi. 

It’s important to note that being at a job longer doesn’t automatically make you more qualified. Choi and Halstead are very different people and approach medicine in a very different way. 

It didn’t even seem like Will wanted the position until Maggie and the other nurses began gassing him up, which should tell you everything. Having just gotten out of a relationship and trying to find his footing, Will was the least likely to be considered for the role. 

It’s almost as if the nurses wanted Will to get jealous that he wasn’t promoted so that he’d start a fight with Ethan.

The duo butted heads over the treatment of Will’s patient, and when Ethan was wrong in his diagnosis, Will figured this was the perfect time to confront Sharon Goodwin about not being chosen for the role. 

It’s never been more satisfying to see someone put Will in his place. 

Will, the hot-headed and impulsive doctor, somehow thought that he deserved to be the one getting promoted to a position where he’d be responsible for calling the shots. Oh, sweet Will. 

Goodwin didn’t mince words when she made it clear that he was never even considered because of how reckless he is. 

However, Choi wasn’t a great fit either. 

He’s been just as impulsive as Will, he’s unreasonable, opinionated, and wants to exert his beliefs and code on others, which we’ve seen in previous seasons. 

They’re both equally as unqualified. Goodwin should have gone with someone outside of the ED for this one. 

It was expected that they’d get into it over their patient’s course of treatment, but now, with Choi as his boss, Will can’t really stand his ground. The truth is, they both have negative qualities and ones that make them great at their jobs, so hopefully, moving forward, they learn to listen to each other and work together.

Ideally, Halstead’s skills could be better used in a different role. Perhaps he’ll find his calling (and love) by helping Dr. Virani with the clinical trial?

April attempted to use her former relationship and closeness with Choi to get her way several times during the episode. The writers either need to let this go or get them back together, but I don’t want to see April getting preferential treatment because she previously dated Choi. 

Choi was right when he rejected bringing in the mother to say goodbye to her dying daughter. With COVID, you can never be too careful. 

The protocol made sense in Choi’s situation, but it wasn’t as black-and-white with Natalie’s pregnant patient from Cook County Jail. 

Things took an ugly turn when Natalie witnessed first hand how differently she was treated for committing the same crime a Black woman did.

Both Aisha and Natalie pushed an officer — Aisha said she did it to protect her cousin, while Natalie did it to protect Aisha when the cop wanted to take her baby.

Natalie got off with a slap on the wrist, but Aisha faced an uphill battle of going back to jail and being separated from her child all because her hearing kept getting postponed due to COVID delays. 

It showed just how flawed the system is and how it doesn’t prioritize the health and wellbeing of inmates. Aisha was a victim, but her daughter was the one who would suffer the most as a result.

It was nice to see Natalie, Goodwin, and the OBGYN try their best to help Aisha, but sadly, even their hands were tied here.

Dr. Charles’ ex-wife was brought to Med after she threw up a significant amount of blood, but the storyline was pretty weak aside from the revelation that she was planning on moving her and Anna to Arizona. 

My guess is that Anna has bonded so significantly with her father that she’s going to want to stick around. Otherwise, Dr. Charles will be forced to say goodbye to another daughter, and who knows if he can handle that! 

And then there’s Dr. Marcel who refuses to get help and masks his problems and depression with wit and charm. I hope Dr. Charles doesn’t give up trying to get through to him because Marcel could use someone to help him work through all the grief that he’s bottled up inside. 

What did you think of the episode?

We’ll see you in 2020, Chihards! 


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Gaffney Takes on COVID-19 (6×01)

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Chicago Med When Did We Begin to Change Review

Chicago Med feels different this season. 

It has nothing to do with the PPE or COVID procedures, although, that definitely brings a new dynamic to the series, it has more to do with the doctor’s being able to finally admit when they are wrong. 

Halstead even apologized for jumping to conclusions! What a change. 

While we’re not fully there quite yet – Natalie and Crockett disagreeing on a patient’s treatment in front of a patient is proof of that – it’s a massive improvement from the ego-driven storylines from previous seasons. 

Choi judged April for putting her life on the line by volunteering in the COVID unit for three straight weeks, but eventually, he saw how important her dedication was. 

April has always been a bit of a martyr who doesn’t listen to reason and puts herself into rather questionable situations, but in this case, she believed that her mission was to be there for COVID patients who didn’t have anyone else by their side.

April’s choice to risk her life was selfless. While this is just a TV show, the scenes unfolding in front of us were snippets from everyday life as we live through a pandemic. 

I’ve written numerous stories of families who lost loved ones and couldn’t be there with them as they took their last breath because the possibility of exposure to the virus was too dangerous. 

For those people, nurses like April are angels, who allow them to have one final moment with their mother, father, brother, sister, or husband via Facetime. 

A big thank you goes out to the healthcare heroes who have lived heartbreaking moments like this in real life. 

It was equally as heartbreaking to watch it play out on screen, but necessary as cases continue to surge and many people refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of COVID. 

Natalie and Crockett didn’t see eye-to-eye on treatment for a young girl with leukemia. This isn’t new for them as they often disagree, but it didn’t help the patient who made it clear that he’s trying to do right by his daughter while the world is upside down. Truer words have never been spoken. 

Eventually, Natalie and Crockett confessed that their personal lives affected their treatment of the patient, which always seems to be the case. 

Doctors and nurses told to remain impartial, but that’s impossible as we live through such unprecedented times. They’re burdened with their own tragedies as they try to save patients and make the right calls. It was just good that they acknowledged exactly what transpired. 

Will Halstead also took on a case that was a little too close to home. 

The episode kickstarted with an ambulance rolling Hannah into the ED due to an overdose. 

Through the course of the episode, and while dealing with a patient who seems to be in denial about alcoholism, Will realized that he and Hannah have both been in denial about her addiction. 

Even worse – he’s very much intertwined in her sobriety, which Dr. Charles warned him about. 

Any misstep in their relationship, like an explosive fight, set Hannah back. And, in return, Will was walking on eggshells waiting for her to relapse. 

It wasn’t a healthy environment for anyone. 

The only way Hannah would become sober, and stay sober, was if she did it for herself and not anyone else.

It was nice to see Will finally get some clarity and admit that he was wrong and Dr. Charles was right. 

This also helped him treat his patient, who wasn’t an alcoholic but suffered from a rare condition called auto-brewery syndrome that turned her carbs into yeast and made her feel drunk. 

It’s a good thing Will did some more research before jumping to conclusions and ruining this woman’s career with the FAA. The old Will wouldn’t have been so level-headed, but it takes strength to apologize and admit you were wrong. It’s the first time we’ve seen Will take ownership of his actions. 

There was also a very powerful scene between Dr. Charles and his daughter Anna, who felt guilty about going out to see her friends and unintentionally getting her dad sick with COVID. 

“You could have died,” she says. Living through a pandemic is scary, and it echoed a fear we’ve likely all had when it comes to our elderly parents or those who are immunocompromised. There’s fear, anger, blame, and all sorts of other emotions that are all valid. 

While the episode juggled COVID and non-COVID stories well, it was focused heavily on the former, which shouldn’t come as a surprise. Viewers tend to want to escape reality when watching a TV show, but a medical show simply can’t ignore the very real global pandemic that’s taken upwards of 240,000 lives. They weren’t overly realistic to the point where it was downright scary, but they did hone in on the fact that COVID affects everyone. 

I’m not a medical professional, so I’m not sure if some of the scenes were dramatized for television, but regardless, everyone should take this episode to heart to fully grasp the impact of the pandemic.

It was a powerful season premiere with a final scene that was heartbreaking to watch as the doctor’s paid tribute to all those who died of COVID. 

And for those who were wondering why no one was wearing masks in the ED, Wolf Entertainment cleared the air on Twitter writing: “Because all staff are quarantined and tested/sanitized each time they come into the hospital, they save the PPE for the nurses and doctors in the Covid ICU. When leaving the hospital, they wear masks!”

Again, this may not be realistic to how real-life hospitals operate, but I don’t think the series was aiming to downplay the severity of the virus. If I were to guess (and this is just my opinion), I’m betting that it would be hard to film a show that the audience could enjoy with the actors wearing masks the whole time. 

Other Noteworthy Moments

  • Will said what we’re all thinking: “I thought we’d be over it by now.”
  • Sharon Goodwin and I have something in common – we have Zoom fatigue! 
  •  Natalie left Owen with Nana and moved into a hotel aka “Club Med” so she could fully dedicate herself to her patients. 
  • There’s a new doctor with a British accent, Sabeen Virani, who is most definitely going to be Will’s new love interest. 
  • Once again, thank you to all the healthcare professionals who are putting their lives on the line day-in and day-out. 

What did you think of the Chicago Med Season 6 premiere?

Sound-off in the comments! 


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Coffee Table News

WATCH: #OneChicago Teams Tackle COVID-19 in New Promo Ahead of November 11

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One Chicago promo ahead of November 11 premiere

Wednesday’s most watched dramas are planning their epic return. 

Ahead of the November 11 premiere for Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD, NBC revealed a teaser that shows the heroes tackling COVID-19 headfirst. 

“When this community hurts, when it reaches out its hand, we pull it to its feet, and we respond,” Battalion Chief Wallace Boden states in the promo.

Med’s doctors jump into action as April tells  ex Choi that she has to put her life on the line to help patients who are “sick, frightened, and alone.”

Fire’s paramedic’s Brett and Mackey respond to a house call and run into some trouble when a man points a gun at them. 

Meanwhile, PD’s Atwater deals with the fallout of “snitching” on the police. While he explains he was doing “the right thing,” the white cops don’t seem to agree as Ray threatens to take his badge. 

Check it out below: 

Related Reads: Everything We Know About ‘Chicago PD’ Season 8 – Police Reform, COVID, and More!


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