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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Crockett and Natalie Taken Hostage and Held at Gunpoint (5×16)

CHICAGO MED -- "Who Should Be The Judge" Episode 516 -- Pictured: (l-r) Dominic Rains as Dr. Crockett Marcel, Torrey DeVitto as Dr. Natalie Manning -- (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

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Alright, hear me out, Natalie and Crockett as hostages would’ve made for a good crossover episode. Right?

In a way, it sort of was a mini-crossover as Jay Halstead led the charge to find the two abducted doctor’s and bring them to safety on Chicago Med. 

Their storyline consumed much of the hour and rightfully so as it was the storyline I was mostly invested in before being completely let down by the lack of cohesiveness. I’ll get to that in a moment.

Natalie and Crockett have been working pretty closely together lately, and some sparks were flying as she began to realize that he’s a thorough and compassionate doctor. His reputation precedes him, but once you get to know Crockett, you see a different side of him.

If Natalie wasn’t considering a relationship prior to this episode, the thought crossed her mind when she found out he was safe and latched onto him. The two of them are going to share a trauma bond, which may explain why she wanted to run back into the house after she heard the gunshot go off and why she held onto him for dear life when she saw he survived, but I think there are some genuine feelings there.

Crockett has been talked up as a player who “gets around” as the watercooler talk between the nurses indicated, but again, I think we haven’t dived into the character enough or his backstory. There was one shot in a previous episode where he felt the weight of losing a child and tried to drink those emotions away, so there must be something darker fueling him.

He’s also exceptionally skilled at staying calm in stressful situations. He remained composed the whole time they were held captive and despite his fear, he made sure to keep Nat safe, which says a lot about him.

The situation the doctors found themselves in was dangerous and not ideal, but there was never any doubt that their friends at Med and PD would come to their rescue. Unless you’re willing to kill off major characters every episode, there’s only so much suspense each scene can bring to the table.

I thought that the episode would focus more on April finding out that Crockett was kidnapped and realizing that she cared more about him then her feelings let on, especially once she found out that he may have been shot inside the house.

Aside from being at the scene when Crockett was released, there was no interaction between the two of them and it felt like such a missed opportunity given how the writers have been building up their relationship and April’s guilt.

Instead, April’s guilt was funneled into agreeing to implant the next round of embryos so she could try for a child with Ethan.

She’s been trying to ease her guilt by being the perfect woman — the woman she thinks he wants — and it’s only going to lead to disaster.

The teaser for the upcoming episode shows April falling incredibly sick and finally admitting the lie that she’s been harboring. Will it break up April and Choi? My guess is that he’ll be disappointed and betrayed that she kept this lie from him for so long and tried to pretend everything was okay.

Chicago Med Who Should be The Judge Review

CHICAGO MED — “Who Should Be The Judge” Episode 516 — Pictured: (l-r) Dominic Rains as Dr. Crockett Marcel, Torrey DeVitto as Dr. Natalie Manning — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)Chica

While Natalie and Crockett’s kidnapping was intense and engaging (and likely necessary to make them a romantic pairing), the motivations from the Clemons brothers were a little hazy.

The scene with his mother was just plain weird. His brother just left after they stopped his leg from bleeding, and if Tyler didn’t want them to help his dying son, who we learned was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer, why did he even bring them back to the house? What did he plan on doing with them?

Why put them through all that stress if he was so willing to shoot himself.

None of it really made all that much sense, and it was unfortunate because it took away from a storyline that could’ve been truly great.

Will Halstead’s crap decisions continued as he visited Hannah in her rehab. Will disregarded the rule that visitors should wait 48 hours because it’s Will and was appalled to see her suffering. Apparently, doctors who go through withdrawal are not allowed to ease off drugs using other drugs, and that felt inhumane to Will, so he, again, disregarded the rules and took it upon himself to help Hannah.

You’d think that rules are there for a reason, but even if we were to agree with Will that the rules suck, it still doesn’t excuse his trash idea of coming to visit Hannah mid-withdrawal and offering her pills.

Even Hannah knew it was a bad idea because she basically freaked out, threw the drugs, and told him to go. She also made a valid point — he put her in there to get off the drugs and now he was trying to sabotage her recovery by giving her drugs.

His intentions may have been in the right place, but Will’s an airhead most of the time. If Hannah had taken the drugs and they were found in her system, she would’ve lost her license for good. Honestly, Will’s gotten in way over his head here cause he clearly doesn’t know anything about dealing with addicts.

The teaser for next week shows Hannah back at work and doing much better, but of course, Will takes any opportunity to make a dumb decision and asks her out on a date. The guy just can’t help himself.

Next week is also the 100th episode of the series, so they have to bring out all the drama (courtesy of Will, April, and Choi) and the big guns like Maggie’s wedding.

You might be like, “say what, Maggie’s wedding,” but yes, Maggie and Ben are engaged.

It may be quick, but it was a spur-of-the-moment decision that came after Maggie learned that she’s officially in remission!

When you’ve gone through something as serious as cancer and then learn that you’ve got another shot at life, life kind of takes on a whole new meaning.

You tend to feel the finality of life and want to make the most of it, which is what Maggie and Ben are doing. They may both be in remission, but if I know anything about this show is that it doesn’t let its characters be happy for too long.

Even when she got the good news and then they got engaged, I was waiting for the other shoe to drop.

So, if they’re embracing the “life’s short, so why not” attitude, so am I.

And Maggie deserves every ounce of that happiness! She’s been the rock of Med, the best friend and support system, and the one who always puts others ahead of herself. It’s her time to shine!

Other Med Musings

  • Family the most important. April and Choi saw that firsthand when a woman who was in dire need of a liver transplant lied to another woman about being her biological daughter. She and her friend basically scouted someone who was an organ match. The crazier part was that the woman knew it wasn’t her daughter, but she wanted a second chance so badly that she allowed herself to be preyed on. I guess no harm no foul if both of them are happy with the outcome, right?
  • Dr. Charles’ case with his schizophrenic patient was tough because it was a lesson for parents. At some point, you have to allow your grown child to make their own decisions, even if that decision is to stop taking meds and losing to this illness.

What did you think of Chicago Med?

Are you excited for the 100th episode? Who is breaking up? Who is getting together?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Choi and Halstead Never Learn (6×07)

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Chicago Med Review Better is the New Enemy of Good Season 6 Episode 7

Dr. Choi and Dr. Halstead simply never learn. 

On Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 7, they both broke hospital protocol (nothing new for them) and found every way to justify their actions. 

When Vera, the first patient Halstead enrolled in his experimental clinical drug trial, came in experiencing strange symptoms, the immediate assumption was that medication was to blame.

However, Dr. Halstead didn’t want to unbind Vera to see if she was on the drug or a placebo, nor did he want to report the situation to Kender’s medical board without checking off all the other boxes first because he knew that would mean they’d pull the drug trial completely. 

While it seemed like Halstead cared more about the trial initially, he made it clear that he didn’t want to hurt all the other patients currently benefitting from the drug, which was fair.

When they kept mentioning how great Mr. Booker was doing because of the trial, I was convinced he would waltz into the ED halfway through the episode experiencing similar symptoms. 

But since no one else in the trial had these responses, Halstead was led to believe it was something entirely unrelated. 

To be absolutely sure that he could rule out the medication, Halstead went behind Sabeena and the company’s back to unbind Vera, which is unethical. 

Of course, when Halstead figured out that Vera’s symptoms were caused by a tumor that was pressing on Vera’s pituitary gland, he figured that his actions didn’t really matter because the end-result protected the trial. 

But the simple fact that he almost came clean to Sabeena means that he’s aware, even subconsciously, that his behavior is shady. 

He broke her trust, and he knew that telling her would ruin their working relationship and potential future relationship. 

Sabeena would never trust Halstead if she knew what he did, but now that he asked her out, it’ll be even worse if she finds out later on when they’ve grown closer in their personal lives.

Halstead can’t ever get it right. 

The worst part is that he roped April into it and now, she’s forced to keep this secret.

Dr. Choi was equally as bad because he came into work after having his gallbladder removed that very morning. Doctors, aka the people who are supposed to know better, are their own worst enemies sometimes!

After collapsing in the middle of his own ED, Choi explained that he didn’t want to shirk his responsibilities, but truthfully, he put himself and his colleagues in danger. 

With a fever of 102,  there was no way he was making sound decisions or performing his best. It would have been better for everyone if he simply took the time to heal. 

The role has taken quite a toll on him, and I thought that his aches and fever were due to exhaustion, which would have jived with the previous storyline introduced on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 6 where he barely left the hospital and drank way too much coffee in order to stay awake.

The most interesting part of Choi’s situation was that he wasn’t just trying to do a good job like he told himself and others. Instead, he was trying to prove himself just like Dr. Charles’ patient Dr. Cohen. 

Since taking on the role of Chief, Choi seems to have Imposter Syndrome. He’s qualified, he’s dedicated, he does a good job, but he constantly feels inadequate, so he pushes himself to do more and do better, which ultimately ends up in burnout. 

Thankfully, his case wasn’t as bad as Dr. Cohen’s, who was an example of a worst-case scenario. The man was having delusions and competing with a dead guy simply to prove he was the best and deserved his spot in the department.

It’s illuminating to see the stock and value we put into careers in this country; so many people turn into workaholics because without a successful career they deem themselves worthless.

Where do we draw the line? When do we realize we shouldn’t value ourselves based on the jobs we have?

Crockett’s storyline continues to be heartbreaking. As he deals with cancer patient after cancer patient, it’s become clear that he has to finally come to terms with the past, which he’s been putting off and internalizing all this time.

Thankfully, he has Natalie. And she has him. 

You know, I think Natalie got it right this time. They not only make a great team, but they’re such a great couple. 

Natalie has been supportive from the beginning and never pushed him to share his story until he was ready. 

Crockett was initially standoffish and very protective about his past, but he’s since opened up to the point where he allowed her to be by his side when he opened the box of his daughter’s belongings. It was a huge and touching moment. 

There’s never going to be a time where it’s easy for Crockett to deal with cancer cases, especially malignant ones that have metastasized and come with a timeline.

Breaking the news to patients is never easy, and standing by as a witness to a rushed wedding isn’t either because he of all people knows the pain and suffering that will follow in a few months to a year. 

Sharon Goodwin dealt with her son, who she felt overstepped in the OR by trying to upsell medical parts. It was a bland storyline, and at this point, I don’t think Chicago Med really knows what to do with Michael’s character.

As for Maggie, she continues to get pushed down every time she tries to pick herself back up. After successfully finding Auggie a liver donor, she and Ben filed to officially adopt the young boy, who is already calling them “mom and dad.”

Everything was perfect, but then the ancestry site she used hoping to find a match for Auggie turned up a brother and the adoptive parents reached out to see if the boys could meet. 

While it’s great that Auggie has a biological family member, it’s obviously scary for Maggie because there’s a chance that Kenshaw’s parents will want to adopt Auggie or that Auggie will want to live with his brother. And I don’t know much about the adoption system, but is it possible they’d want to place Auggie with his brother?

I truly hope that isn’t the case because Maggie’s new family makes my heart melt every time they’re on the screen. They belong together. 

What do you think will happen with Auggie?

What did you think of the episode? Sound off in the comments section below! 


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – A Good Day in the ED (6×06)

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Chicago Med Review Don't Want to Face This Now Season 6 Episode 6

It’s always a welcome surprise when there’s good news in the ED. 

And there was no shortage on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 6, which tackled many of the issues introduced the week prior including Anna’s unexpected pregnancy, Choi’s decision to fire Noah, and Auggie’s need for a liver transplant. 

While things seemed bleak at first, by the end of the hour, everyone’s luck was looking up.

Dr. Charles accidentally stumbled upon family planning pamphlets that fell out of Anna’s coat, which was probably for the best because Anna really needed her dad more than she realized. That was especially true when she began bleeding and learned that she had a chemical pregnancy. 

This was obviously a relief for someone Anna’s age, but it’s likely going to lead to a pretty nasty fight between Dr. Charles and his ex-wife, whose need to be in control seems to be alienating her family, particularly her daughter. 

Anna didn’t even want Charles to tell her mom the truth because she was afraid of her reaction.  And just imagine what that reaction will be when she thinks that Charles has been deliberately keeping something this big from her. 

I love that Dr. Charles didn’t freak out on Anna even though every bone in his body was probably telling him to. Anna was already scared as it is, so it was reassuring that her dad kept a cool head and approached the situation as though she were an adult. She realized she made a careless mistake — she didn’t need to be punished for it even more. 

I’m also happy that Charles didn’t seem to blame Nat at all. Would he have liked a heads up? Yes. But he also understands the situation Natalie was placed in and that HIPA required full confidentiality on her part. 

Rules as rules. Some rules, however, don’t have the patient’s best interest at heart. 

With his liver failing, Auggie was running out of time.

While Maggie may not be his legal mother, she is his caretaker and should have been able to sign off on a liver transplant, especially since he doesn’t have any other family around to fight for him. 

It’s crazy to think that a child that has someone in his corner still might not get the necessary help because of legalities. Why is the system set up to fail those who rely on it?

The liver may have been compromised, but it assured that he had a fighting chance to deal with any problems down the line. 

I can’t understand how DCFS would stand behind a rule that basically gave the A-OK to leave a dying child without any options. 

Auggie is lucky to have such a firecracker like Maggie by his side. She never gave up and wasn’t willing to take no for an answer. It was sweet to see him call her “mom” and prompted her decision to legally adopt him. After all, they’re already acting like his parents!  

Sharon Goodwin signed off on the surgery, which was risky, but what would it say about her if she stood by and let an innocent boy die because of some blanket rule? In this case, the rule was meant to be bent. And she’s right — DCFS doesn’t want that kind of bad PR. The public would not be kind if they found out that they stood by idly and let a child die. 

Still, I don’t think she’s in the clear just yet. She’ll eventually have to answer for signing off on the life-saving surgery and overriding the rules. But for now, let’s just rejoice in the fact that Auggie is thriving!

Dr. Halstead has always been a great ED doctor, but following the rules, well, that’s not his strong suit.

Chicago Med Review Don't Want to Face This Now Season 6 Episode 6

CHICAGO MED — “Don’t Want To Face This Now” Episode 606 — Pictured: Nick Gehlfuss as Dr. Will Halstead — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

When Choi went back on his word and told him he wouldn’t give him time for his presentation, Dr. Halstead blatantly disregarded his orders. He’s never been happy to have lost out on the promotion to Choi, but in this case, he also understood that he made a commitment to the trial. 

I can’t say that I disagree with Halstead’s decision either. He’s passionate about saving lives and that includes getting the word out about the trial and its potential effectiveness. And as he mentioned, the trial is sanctioned by the hospital, so it indirectly benefits Choi.

Dr. Choi also wasn’t being fair to Halstead; he knew how important the presentation was to him and refused to be flexible. There was obviously a way to staff the ED and give Halstead the hour since he managed to sneak out anyway and all of his patients were covered. 

I’m into Halstead considering a transition from the ED to a full-time gig with clinical trials. Maybe it really is time for a change. However,  I can’t shake the feeling that Sabina is trying to rope him into something. Could it be because Halstead is always being roped into weird situations?

Also, are they ever going to go on a date? It’s so obvious that they’re into each other, let’s get this romance moving!

Choi’s been having a tough time wrangling his staff, which is only making his job harder. 

The fact that he hasn’t slept and has just been running on coffee is concerning and a sign of how rigorous the job of Chief of the ED truly is.

I figured that because of the “no sleep” situation, Choi would end up fumbling and putting a patient at risk, which would question his ability to handle the job responsibilities but that wasn’t the case. 

Even with an empty tank, Choi remained committed to his patients and helped the Bowmans figure out a health issue plaguing Mr. Bowman for over a year.

Bowman was continuously misdiagnosed by other doctors, which explained the aggression, irritability, and disregard for the profession, but once Choi put his mind to it, he figured it out. Isn’t it great that Mr. Bowman no longer has to suffer?

Also, how awesome is Dr. Abrams and his blunt responses? 

This was also the first time in a while that April not only acknowledged Choi’s hard work but also understood how difficult his new role must be since he can’t please everyone. She saw firsthand the toll it was taking on him and likely realized she’s only been making things harder on him. 

It’s unclear if the series wants to get these two back together, but their storylines continue to revolve around each other months after their split. What gives?

Manning and Crockett treated a patient who became dizzy and fell, and while it wasn’t evident on her CT, the young woman, Cindy, had a malignant tumor in her stomach. 

She chose not to get it removed, which didn’t sit well with either of the doctors, but sadly, there wasn’t much they could do; Cindy made her choice, which was to live with a deadly tumor as she didn’t want to undergo all the painful treatments she’d seen her mom undergo only to pass away anyway. 

Eventually, Crockett realized he needed to make it personal if he had any shot of convincing Cindy. 

His speech about his one-year-old daughter being a fighter pulled at the heartstrings. You could tell it took a lot out of Crockett to relive the past and be open about it, especially since he tends to keep his personal matters under wraps. 

However, it worked and Cindy agreed to fight for her life. It’s better to die trying than to not try at all.

This connected back to his visit from his ex, who left him a box of belongings and memories after she sold the house. The one box, in particular, held all of his daughter, Harper’s, things, and though he thought maybe he’d finally be able to face it, he broke down crying looking at the memories.

At this point, Crockett is my favorite character. It’s been enjoyable and revealing to peel back his layers and learn more about his past.

The episode also saw the return of Kelly Bisset, the kidnapping victim who was reunited with her mother on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 3.

In my review of that episode, I noted that the case wrapped up too quickly and left so many questions unanswered. 

There was a lot of promise in revisiting the case, but sadly, it didn’t provide audiences with any of the answers like what happened to her prior to getting to the hospital, how she got to the hospital, where was she held, and who kidnapped her. 

We did, however, see the aftermath and shock that Kelly endured upon returning to her childhood home, which was welcome.

She was having a hard time adjusting as she didn’t have any of the “happy memories” that her mother kept referring to and reminding her of. 

The fact that she couldn’t connect or be that girl for her mother made her feel inadequate and she decided to jump out of a moving vehicle to make the feelings go away. 

While talking with both Kelly and her mom, Dr. Charles realized that neither of them remembered much about Kelly’s childhood and that’s because her mother was making a lot of it up. She felt guilty for not being more present when Kelly was a child.

It was heartbreaking, but at least Dr. Charles helped both of them realize that the key to bonding now was to do less and make new memories. They could never change or recapture the past, but the future was theirs for the taking. 

It wasn’t the best use of the hour, but it was nice to see the series return to a previous case and build on it. 

What did you think of the episode? Let us know in the comments below! 


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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – [SPOILER] Is Pregnant (6×05)

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Chicago Med When Your Heart Rules Your Head Review Season 6 Episode 5

The line between doing the right thing and doing what you think is right becomes a bit blurry on Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 5, which sees the brief return of Noah Sexton. 

An elderly couple is brought into the ED after being found unconscious due to a gas leak. 

Noah immediately recognizes that the man is Mr. Coleman, a legend in Chicago for his work opening free clinics on the South Side. 

When his wife dies, Coleman confesses to staging the whole thing so that his wife could find peace following her ALS diagnosis. Since he realized he couldn’t live without her, the plan was for them to both die and have the cause be an accidental gas leak.

Unfortunately, he didn’t die, which means that what he did is technically considered murder. 

Noah and Marcel both felt for Coleman and tried to explain that what he did was assist his wife in ending her life. However, Dr. Choi doesn’t see it that way because he follows a moral code. Not reporting it to the police would be an obstruction of justice.

Dr. Choi has been Chief for a few weeks now, and it seems that the crux of his job is to get into situations that find him pushing back against his staff. 

While it’s not a good position to find yourself in, I can definitely see Noah’s perspective. Coleman wasn’t a risk to anyone, and he wasn’t going to go out and kill other people. He was simply acting on his wife’s wish to ease her pain and suffering. 

It’s easy to judge from the outside looking in, but imagine watching the person you love wither away in pain and not being able to do anything about it. 

Noah then decided that he wasn’t going to watch a good, noble man get wrongfully punished, so he slipped Coleman a syringe with a deadly dose and looked away as he injected himself. 

The situation gets murky here because technically, Noah broke a law and should be reported, but on the other hand, he helped a man die on his own terms who didn’t deserve to rot in prison. 

The only thing Noah truly fudged, in my opinion, was not giving it his all to sell the story. Choi could never prove any foul play even if he suspected Noah of it. Noah could’ve said it was an accident and there would be no way of proving he did anything on purpose. 

But Noah put zero effort into selling that narrative and basically admitted to assisting Coleman. 

Chicago Med When Your Heart Rules Your Head Review Season 6 Episode 5

CHICAGO MED — “When Your Heart Rules Your Head” Episode 605 — Pictured: Torrey DeVitto as Natalie Manning — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

April naturally got dragged into it and begged Choi not to report Noah to the police and destroy his whole medical career. 

When push came to shove, Choi couldn’t bring himself to throw Noah under the bus, but he did fire him for negligence. And Noah didn’t even try to fight that because he stood by his decision to help Coleman. 

I’d respect Choi if the decision was based solely on his opinion, but instead, he made it because he was pressured by April.

I’m not a fan of April constantly trying to leverage her past relationship with Choi to get her way. It happens almost every episode and it’s tiring. 

They have a personal relationship, but it doesn’t mean that Choi needs to take that into consideration when weighing options on how to handle an issue. 

April also went at it with Dr. Halstead when she tried to get her previous COVID patient into his clinical trial. 

She wasn’t exactly wrong about the trial being skewed and biased to exclude minorities who are more at risk for heart failure in the first place, but she shouldn’t have come at Halstead so hard. She tends to be so out of line. She blamed him as if he was solely responsible instead of acknowledging that he’s simply following the rules and trying to make a change for the better in any way that he can. 

He eventually caved and rigged Booker’s test so that he could meet the criteria for the trial, but what happens when that comes back to bite them? Guidelines are set up for a reason to protect a patient. They could’ve made an on-the-books exception, but trying to alter his tests to qualify him seems shady. 

Natalie’s case was the most interesting as it focused on Anna, Dr. Charles’ daughter. While he was embroiled in a nasty custody case with his ex, who wanted to move her and her daughter to Arizona for a job, Anna came to Natalie to get birth control pills under the radar. 

Seeing that Anna wanted to be safe without triggering her parents, Natalie agreed to run some labs on the down-low. And she realized there was no need for birth control because Anna was already pregnant. 

Now, seeing as though there’s a custody battle, Anna is definitely under 18. Because of patient confidentiality, Natalie legally cannot say anything to Dr. Charles, but Anna will eventually have to, especially when things get even more intense between her parents.

Dr. Charles is very understanding when it comes to his patients, but how will he react when he learns his baby girl might have a baby of her own?

Natalie also realized she was ready to embrace her fling with Marcel, which is awesome, but the moment was interrupted by his ex-wife, Claire. 

It didn’t seem like Claire was interested in getting back together with him, but does she plan on moving back to Chicago now that she sold her house? I have a sneaking suspicion that she didn’t come all this way just to give her ex back some of his things. 

Will she come between Nat and Marcel? Will she give us more insight into his past?

And then there’s poor Maggie, who found out that Auggie’s Hereditary and Me test didn’t return any relatives who could provide a kidney.

Maggie has gone through so much. We’re so used to seeing her as a strong-willed woman, but it was nice to see her open up to Dr. Charles and admit that sometimes, she just wants to be vulnerable.

Even when she and Ben were battling cancer, Maggie persevered and never allowed herself to be weak.

It’s nice to see this new side of her that just feels helpless and defeated because it’s normal. She doesn’t have to be strong all the time; she doesn’t always have to hold it together. And that’s especially true as she watches a young boy that she loves face death because he cannot find a donor and isn’t considered sick enough to be bumped to the top of the list despite only having a short time to live.

The system is so flawed, it’s disgusting. Will Maggie figure something out to save Auggie?

What did you think of the episode? Was Noah out of line? Should Choi have reported him? What would you have done? Leave your thoughts in the comments below! 


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