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Chicago Med

Chicago Med – The Space Between Us (4×17)

CHICAGO MED -- "The Space Between Us" Episode 417 -- Pictured: Yaya DaCosta as April Sexton -- (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

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Chicago Med has a problem.

A ‘beating the relationship to death’ kind of problem.

The storylines as they pertain to the patients are riveting, yet they’re continuously utilized as a platform for relationships we’ve long stopped caring about.

This week, for example, the strongest moments of the episode came from the two cystic fibrosis patients who were cursed with the inability to touch out of fear that they would cross-contaminate each other and die.

Having just seen Justin Baldoni’s film, Five Feet Apart, these patients struck a chord with me.

When it became evident that the boy wouldn’t be healthy enough for a lung transplant, Nat and Will arranged for the two to finally have a moment together.

Not only was this the first time they touched, it was the also their last; a parting gift.

I was misty-eyed watching their first and final kiss play out knowing it was a catch-22 for the girl.

She would be taking his new lungs and wouldn’t be there when he died. But if she didn’t take the lungs, she herself would die.

Sadly, their storyline, while powerful all on its own merit, was a scapegoat for Will to have a breakthrough moment about one day getting back together with Nat.

Will, the ship has sailed my friend. Move on.

I have been done with Will and Nat since before their disastrous wedding, but I gave them a chance because the writers seemed to think that despite all their apparent issues, they would somehow make it.

Now, all I see is Will’s delusions.

Nat has moved on with Phillip and while some may say that was fast on her part, why would she keep trying with someone that clearly wasn’t meant for her?

Why would she deny a connection with someone else because the norm is to allow a certain amount of time to pass before you allow yourself to be happy again?

Maybe Will’s purpose was to show Natalie that she should move on.

Then, a car drove into the fricking ER! A whole vehicle. Bam, right through the door.

The driver passed out at the wheel while another patient was pinned under the car.

April, being the good nurse that she is, slid under the vehicle to stop the mans bleeding, but all Ethan could do was worry about her.

Yes, seeing the woman you love purposefully put herself in danger is alarming, but at the end of the day, they are there to do a job. Ethan’s patient was the man, not April, and he should have been making the calls based on his health, not his ex-girlfriend’s.

While I respect that he looked out for her, this goes way beyond just this one incident; it spans across every scene they’ve ever shared. Ethan loves April, but he also sees a helpless woman who needs his protection.

April is far from that, however.

She’s strong, she’s a fighter, and she cares about her patients more than she cares about herself.

Ethan contiously disrespects her wishes and goes against whatever she says and then wonders why she doesnt want to be with him.

These dudes at Med really need to get a wakeup call. Women have brains, they are capable of thinking for themselves and making decisions that will benefit them.

Another problem the show contiues running into is letting personal issues interfere wih patient care.

Daniel was the culprit this week as he let his emotions for his wife and feelings of helplessness cloud his judgment about a patient when he put her on a mandatory 24-hour psych evaluation.

While doctors may think they know best, ultimately, patients are responsible for making their own drcisions.

You cant keep anyone involuntarily without a good reason.

The woman may have been malnourished, but she wasn’t a damger to herself or anyone around her.

Anyone with an illness must understand what it’s like to simply exhaust all other options and latch onto the one thing that does help with the pain.

During this whole scene, I was more interested in Lauren’s take and actually found it interesting how she embraced the at-home clinical trial.

I wish they followed through on this storyline as it would have been impactful than Charles, a proressional, going against his better judgment and making emotional-laden decisions.

Even his ex-wife wasn’t interested in having him bulldoze her care, and the only way she could make it known was by physically threatening him out of the room. I now know why these two got a divorce.

Charles’ behavior to both the patient and his ex-wife mimicked Ethan and Will’s. Again, he thought he knew better than everyone else solely because he has a medical degree.

A love triangle is brewing between Connor, Ava and Robin, but Robin is clearly winning over here.

Much like Connor was impressed with Ava’s mind when he first met her, he is now kmpressed by his ex-girlfriend who found him a solution to what seemed like an unsolvable problem.

Ava is understandably bitter by this whole situation.

If you’ve ever had to work with an ex who is now infatuated with his other ex, you get it.

Ava seemingly risked everything to help Connor achieve his dreams and he turned his back on in the most brutal way — by calling her a liar, painting her as some vindictive person and accusing her of sleeping with his father.

Now look, all of these things may be true, but that simply doesn’t add up with the Ava we knew from seasons past.

She was a badass, a genius and impervious to Connor’s charm, but now she just looks pathetic whenever theys how her in a scene.

How did we get here?

And why haven’t we cleared this up?

Connor hasn’t even allowed her to speak her peace and have an adult conversation with her. He’s simply basing his feelings on how what he believes went down.

However, Ava has a tendency of making haste and vengeful decisions, so I hope she doesn’t try to take out Robin from the equation by any extreme measures.

Oh, and let’s not forget Robin has no clue Connor and Ava had a fling. How do you think she’ll react when she finds out?

Well, what did you think of the epsiode, Cravers?

Are you tired of rehashing the same relationship woes with couples who have long broken up and should have stayed broken up?

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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Will Halstead Continues to Make Terrible Decisions (5×15)

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Chicago Med I Will Do No Harm Review

I’m going to say this, and I mean it in the best possible way, but what were the writers of Chicago Med thinking with these storylines?

Lately, it feels as if they’re trying to upstage themselves from week-to-week, and the more ridiculous the cases coming into the ED, the less we get in terms of quality character arcs and development.

On “I Will Do No Harm,” it was difficult to even take Dr. Charles and Dr. Manning’s case seriously, and it seems as though the former felt the same way based on his reactions.

Dr. Charles has seen and dealt with a lot of situations, but this was a first, and I’m wondering how the writers even came up with the idea.

The first case surrounded a woman who hired an actor to pretend to be her daughter’s father. The actor became all-consumed by the role and when she suggested he exit stage-right and disappear from the girl’s life, he felt that “wasn’t authentic” to his character so he poisoned himself so that he could die in front of his daughter and give her proper closure.

Her fake father refused to tell the doctor what he took until he realized he couldn’t hurt his “daughter” this way and came clean so that they could save him.

When Dr. Charles talked with the girl about how her father wasn’t really her father but loves her like one, she didn’t seem too concerned and that was that.

Honestly, they should have just called DCFS immediately. I kid, obviously. The little girl was obviously loved, but she’s going to need a lot of therapy to work through all of this and make sense of it once she’s older.

Also, and this should go without saying, but as someone who was raised by a single mother, there’s absolutely no reason for anyone to ever “hire” a fake father, even if you don’t have good male role models around.

The second case found April and her brother, Noah, out in the field, which was a nice change of pace. Chicago Med is set in Chicago like the other two show’s in the franchise, but they rarely utilize the city as a backdrop. I wouldn’t be surprised if some people thought the series was filmed on a soundstage somewhere in California.

It was also nice to see April work alongside someone other than Ethan and Crockett, the two men her heart pitter-patters for.

The case found Larry, doing laps around the block to keep his heart rate up until paramedics arrived.

Noah struggled slightly in the field and assumed it was a reflection of himself and his own skills, but realistically, it was an almost impossible situation.

At one point, he was asked to pull a wire through to Larry’s heart while he was running and one false move risked rupturing organs. It’s not surprising that Noah was on edge the whole time.

Thankfully, it resulted in a good save and a good day for the dynamic sibling duo. Noah needed that little boost of confidence.

Crockett and Ethan continue to work together, which really must make April beyond anxious, and their patient was a death-row inmate accused of killing a family of 5.

The death penalty is a controversial form of punishment because of how brutal and permanent it is, and we’re not going to get into all of that, but we are going to point out just how big of a hypocrite Ethan is.

There have been countless episodes where he “refused” or fought against helping a patient because they did something that he didn’t agree with morally like rape or murder, but when Crockett didn’t necessarily care to waste his time amputating this man’s arm knowing he was going to be executed anyway, Dr. Choi acted holier than thou.

Honestly, I don’t care which side Choi picks but just pick and stick to it.

You’re either a doctor who doesn’t let his beliefs and judgments influence patient care or you aren’t — but this wishy-washy, back-and-forth stuff is getting tiresome and paints Choi in a negative light.

I’m also unclear as to what happened when they did finally get the man on the operating table. Did Crockett allow him to die? Did they not do their best to save him? Was this all Choi’s fault. Can someone explain it to me?

And lastly, Will and Hannah’s push-and-tug storyline came to a head only after he’d slept with her and lost all credibility as a man, friend, and doctor.

It’s unclear why Will ever thought sleeping with Hannah was a good idea or why he thought she was stable enough to stick to the promise she made of turning herself in.

Addicts tend to be liars, and Hannah said whatever she needed to to get Halstead off of her back.

Plus, Hannah needed his help, she didn’t need him to take her to bed.

While his anger at Hannah going AWOL was warranted, it also made you wonder if Halstead had any idea about what an addict goes through because he genuinely seemed surprised that Hannah relapsed.

Come on, Halstead, get it together man. I feel like I say that every week.

His best bet was to have drug-sniffing dogs check out her car because it confirmed his concerns that she was still using and treating patients.

If he had gone to Goodwin and told her, he could’ve been discredited for a. running an illegal clinic and b. sleeping with Hannah, but since he got proof first before opening his mouth (a big deal for Halstead), Goodwin is more likely to hear him out.

It may be a hard thing to do, but it’s in Hannah’s best interest.

She kept telling Halstead that her addiction wasn’t interfering with patients, but we saw firsthand that that wasn’t the case when one of her patients came in and was forced to give birth prematurely.

The situation didn’t have to escalate as much as it did if Hannah had been around to comfort and guide her patient, but instead, they waited to the last minute risking not only the mother’s life but also the baby’s.

Thankfully, everyone made it out safe and sound.

What did you think of the episode?

How many more Crockett and Choi incidents before she tells him the truth? Does Will need to get some sense knocked into him?

Are you digging these cases lately?

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Coffee Table News

The First ‘Chicago Fire’ and ‘Chicago PD’ Crossover of 2020 Is Coming – Watch the Promo

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Chicago Fire and Chicago PD crossover Off the Grid 2020

Fans of Chicago PD, Chicago Med, and Chicago Fire will have to wait an additional week for new episodes.

The One Chicago universe is taking a break this Wednesday (February 19) as it gears up for the first crossover of 2020.

The two-part crossover excludes Chicago Med, though the series will kick off the hour with an intense episode of its own, and instead, finds PD and Fire teaming up to respond to a national epidemic.

It even brings back a beloved PD character, although, it’s not in a way that you’d expect and might not be all that great for Roman (guest star Brian Geraghty).

Chicago Fire and Chicago PD crossover Off the Grid 2020

CHICAGO P.D. — “Burden of Truth” Episode 716 — Pictured: Brian Geraghty as Sean Roman — (Photo by: Matt Dinerstein/NBC)

Here’s what to expect from the crossover airing Wednesday, February 26!

Chicago Fire

In a two-show crossover event with “Chicago P.D.,” a series of teen opioid overdoses sees Severide partner with Sean Roman (Brian Geraghty), but begins to suspect there’s more to the story than his old friend is telling him. Casey tries to be there for Brett as she considers her birth mother’s offer to meet.
Chicago PD
Part 2 of Crossover with Chicago Fire; Intelligence searches for the dealer who caused multiple overdoses and is connected to Roman’s missing sister. The case becomes a homicide investigation when they find the dealer’s dead body. Guest star: Brian Geraghty.
See the promo below!

Previously on Chicago Med, Will Halstead made a questionable decision when he possibly pursued a relationship with Hannah, an addict he met at the clinic. PD found Burgess recovering from her miscarriage following a violent beating from a suspect responsible for sex-trafficking innocent women.

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Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Halstead Proves He’s Incapable of Making a Good Decision to Save His Life (5×14)

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It Might Not Be Forever Chicago Med Review

Is Will Halstead capable of making good decisions?

One of the qualifications of being a doctor is making medically sound decisions on behalf of your patients, and despite Halstead’s best attempts, you have to question where his head’s at during that conversation with Dr. Asher.

Will started off on the right foot by clearing the air with Asher, encouraging her to “get clean,” and even suggesting he would meet her for a Narcotic’s Annonymous meeting in the morning.

My fear was that Asher would leave the clinic and try to score somewhere else, which didn’t happen, but she ditched the meeting and gave Will a mouthy response about stalking her. The mood swings are understandable, so we will forgive her.

Eventually, Will surmised that he cannot stand by and watch Asher take patients while suffering from addiction so he terminated his position at the safe injection site mainly to protect them from her retaliation and arranged a meeting with her.

So far, so good.

Here’s where things hit a bit of a snag when it came to Will’s decision making.

For starters, he offered to meet Asher at a bar. Who brings an addict to a bar? Really, Will?

He then proceeded to tell Asher his plan — you turn yourself in or I will — and let her know that he’s not with the clinic anymore (though, she said she would never actually report him).

Asher lied to Will before after promising that she’d meet him at a meeting, so what makes Will so confident she will hold up her end of the deal here and turn herself in the next morning? And even so, telling the truth doesn’t cure someone’s addiction — it’s a long road.

From here it just gets progressively worse. Asher seems to be trying to manipulate him by preying on his feelings and acting touched that he cares.

“I care,” Will flirtingly tells her. Hands touch, fingers collide, and she invites him back to her place to which Halstead smiles and nods. Lord…

In some ways, Asher is kind of a patient now that he’s agreeing to help. Halstead exhibited questionable judgment when he decided to get involved with someone in a fragile mental state and someone on the verge of losing her license because he’s pushing her into a corner.

There are a few outcomes here including Asher getting emotionally attached, Asher dragging him down with him, or Asher killing him. She seems nice, sure, but she could kill him to protect her secret. It may be extreme, but we’ve seen crazier things on this show.

So, I beg you, Halstead, do not accept that invitation. It’s incredibly reckless to start a relationship with someone you barely know, who has a drug problem and doesn’t seem to want to get help on her own. She also threatened his career.

It’s noble of him to want to help someone get clean, but that’s where he needs to draw the line. It sounds like a bad movie, and Halstead needs to know that you cannot change a person that doesn’t want to be changed.

April and Ethan dealt with a newlywed couple whose honeymoon phase even got them turned on in the ED.

It’s unclear why anyone would want to get it on in a place filled with bacteria, but more power to them.

Their love story took a wrong turn when it was revealed that the woman’s rash was being caused by an allergic reaction to her husband’s sperm. I didn’t know that was possible, but you learn something new every day.

The couple’s attractiveness towards each other made April realize that she and Ethan haven’t been spontaneously intimate at all through this IVF phase, and despite his best efforts, April’s guilt serving as a bit of a block.

April’s not over Crockett as evidenced in the elevator. She so badly wants to be over him, but she tenses up every time she’s near him because that sexual energy is too much to handle. I keep saying it, but I’ll say it again, April needs to be honest with herself, come clean about her feelings, and tell Ethan the truth. Stop torturing yourself, girl.

Crockett is quickly becoming my favorite character on the series next to Dr. Curry!

There is this airiness and easiness about him that’s almost foreign in the ED. He has never once wavered on his beliefs and has always suggested that the next of kin make the decision about a patient’s health.

He doesn’t let his personal beliefs or his wants and needs as a human or surgeon cloud his judgment. He looks at facts and makes morally sound decisions, and when things don’t’ go his way, he usually doesn’t have to make some lengthy argument about why they should have. He accepts what’s happening and then makes a simple, subtle comment that puts into perspective why his decision was his decision.

That happened when he went head-to-head with Natalie about whether or not to let Kim, a car crash victim, make a medical decision about her husband.

Natalie noticed Kim was a victim of abuse and didn’t want her to make a decision she would regret, but Crockett argued that despite what happened in their private life, she was still the next of kin and those rights belonged to her.

The most frustrating part about Natalie’s argument is that she had no confirmation Kim was an abuse victim. She had bruises that aligned with the symptoms of abuse, but nothing else to go off of. What if Kim was being abused by a lover?

Eventually, the Ethics Committee voted that Kim should be stripped of decision rights and that her husband should get his leg amputated.

Kim was already a mess when she came into the hospital but she really lost it after that as she basically melted down about what her husband would do to her if he woke up without a leg and it was all her fault.

Natalie offered to “help,” but Kim pulled the plug and murdered her husband when no one was around.

As Crockett put it: an abuse victim went to jail and that didn’t seem like the right outcome.

I’d have to agree. There’s what you should do based on the book and there’s what you should do based on the case.

Kim was making a decision for her safety, and when that was taken from her, she went to the extremes. When people are left without a choice, they’re willing to go far.

And I can’t fault her for what she did. No one understands the level of personal hell and fear you live in each day. For all we know, she crashed the car on purpose.

If Natalie had just left it alone, Kim would have been free from her demons.

Natalie has always had an ego complex that reared its ugly head mainly when she was with arguing with Will over who was right. With Crockett, she gets put in her place because she understands that her outcome may not have been the right one.

Curry is my second favorite because she’s gone from this book-heavy intern to someone who trusts her own medical judgment and is learning to speak up for herself.

She still makes plenty of missteps since she’s learning, but she’s a fun character to bring into Dr. Charles’ realm because she keeps him on his toes.

The case, in particular, was unlike anything we’ve ever seen since the young boy was suffering from a rare condition.

If not for Curry’s inquisitiveness, the boy’s parents would have never known he was misdiagnosed. They would go on thinking he was in a vegetative state when in reality he was suffering from catatonia, which put his body into a state of shock caused by the paralyzing fear of his father’s job.

It was a heartbreaking situation as the father wanted so badly to be with his son but knew he had to separate himself to give him his best chance, but at least they were on a path of healing.

That’s all anyone can really ask for after leaving a hospital.

What did you think of Chicago Med? Is Halstead making a mistake if he goes to Asher’s place and hooks up with her?

Are Natalie and Crockett going to become an item? Will we ever learn about his past?

Will April come clean to Ethan?

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