Connect with us
Chicago Med We're Lost in the Dark Review Chicago Med We're Lost in the Dark Review

Chicago Med

Chicago Med – We’re Lost in the Dark (5×02)

Credit: Chicago Med/ NBC

Published

on


Chicago Med continues to surprise and excel in its fifth season.

After a steller, albeit slightly soap opera-ish, premiere, the doctors at Gaffney brought life to a predictable and common trope.

The power outage caused by a storm pushed the doctors to their limits, and we almost got through the hour without any of their personal lives hijacking the storyline.

Almost being the keyword.

A focus on medical storylines always delivers great results and forces the ED to work together.

But things start to fall apart when the series tries to draw connections between the textbook material and what’s happening to the doctors in their personal lives.

We saw the same back-and-forth with Natalie and Will as we had in previous seasons. The addition of the brain injury causing memory loss trope paired with the possibility of Phillip being a complete nutjob was promising even if it was a bit much.

I mean, they basically sounded the alarm on Phillip in the Chicago Med season 5 premiere.

But we didn’t see any of that.

Nor did we get to see how Natalie’s injury was affecting her life outside of the romance aspect.

The whole arc was created with the sole purpose of creating more unnecessary drama between Will and Natalie.

While Natalie still had memory loss — as in she didn’t remember the proposal that never happened — there wasn’t any mention of her relationship with Phillip being off.

Will approached Natalie to welcome her back and things seemed fine between them. When Natalie told Maggie that she didn’t have feelings for Phillip anymore, a possible side-effect of her brain injuries, it seemed like a Will and Natalie reconciliation was on the horizon.

And then, like clockwork, Will pushed too far, got too invested in Natalie’s relationship, and pushed her away.

She got defensive of her relationship and without even wanting to, Will pushed her back into Phillip’s arms.

There’s no universe in which Natalie and Will’s storyline isn’t dysfunctional.

No matter how many times they try it always plays out the exact same way.

Phillip might be crazy but Will’s clinging to something he should have let go of a while ago.

On her first day back, Natalie was put under immense pressure when she was trapped in an elevator with a gunshot patient in a severe state.

She pulled through with the help of Chicago Fire’s Matt Casey, but it wasn’t without a few hiccups and headaches.

Natalie may seem fine but she’s been through a traumatic event herself — maybe she isn’t exactly ready for a full comeback.

Another person who should probably take it easy is Maggie.

If there’s anything we take away from the episode is that Maggie won’t be able to keep her chemo under wraps for too long.

Maggie doesn’t lean on people for help — she likes to be the one that people come to.

But asking for help is a necessary quality and one that she needs to embrace if she wants to beat this.

No one would look down on her. Yes, they might stop her from doing her job, but it’s best for her to take it easy.

If it had been just any other day, she could have gotten away with working her full shift.

Unfortunately, it was a long, high-stress day and the combination of chemo, doing too much, and the extreme heat took its toll on Maggie.

At the very least, she should tell her best friends April and Natalie.

They deserve to know and be there for her.

Noah’s back in the ED. His absence for the last half of the season wasn’t addressed, and he was thrown back right into the mix presenting the episode with somewhat of an ethical dilemma.

Noah didn’t agree with Dr. Marcel’s aggressive approach to selling bypass surgery to a patient.

It’s unclear if the patient’s situation was as dire as Dr. Marcel made it seem, but nevertheless, the patient agreed.

Noah seemed to have his hesitations even more so when the power went out.

If Marcel hadn’t been so persuasive, the patient wouldn’t have been in this situation.

But nothing else was explored in terms of ethics.

Noah later joined in on the surgery offering an extra hand and impressing Marcel who said he has “good hands.”

There’s no denying the whole reason for this scene was for Noah to get inspired and ditch his vision of a clinic to pursue a specialization.

While Noah stepped up to the plate during a time of crisis, poor Steve didn’t fair as well.

The medical student was thrown into the hubbub of the power outage when Dr. Choi learned he wanted to be an ED doctor and neede an extra hand.

Steve’s experience was just as traumatic as the patient’s life-or-death situation.

Seeing him overwhelmed and shocked by the situation unfolding in front of him was understandable — this was his first day!

He wasn’t ready to go into war-mode. Even experienced doctors were in panic mode.

So it was no surprise that by the end, Steve said that he was quitting despite his love for medicine.

To be fair, not every day is this intense, but the job isn’t for the faint of heart. If your heart isn’t in it, it’s probably best to find a different career path.

Dr. Choi wondered if he was too hard on the guy, but in reality, there was no time to ease him into a situation.

Despite walking him through everything, Dr. Choi treated him like a doctor and threw him in right into the action.

Steve wasn’t ready.

If that’s where this plot finished it would have been solid, but instead, the writers tried to tie it back to April and Ethan’s desire to have children.

Dr. Choi didn’t hold Steve’s hand or anticipate his needs (he was a little preoccupied) so that somehow meant that April would make a good mom cause she at least offered him a granola bar and water.

It’s a stretch to reiterate that the writers want these two to be parents at all costs.

And then there was Halstead’s patients, three girls who were suffering from seizures.

The “infection” started with one, spread to the second girl and then finally the third.

But seeing Dr. Charles lurk in the background with his brow furrowed meant that he was about to make a psychiatric breakthrough.

He didn’t believe Halstead’s theory that all these girls were infected.

They may have been exhibiting seizures and symptoms, but they were also attempting to study for AP Calculus while shaking and throwing up.

Turns out, Dr. Charles was right — the girls weren’t infected, they were simply under an immense amount of stress and were exhibiting a follower’s syndrome, which sounds like something we’d diagnose people on social media with.

The pressure to succeed will do that to you.

The moment Dr. Charles had a psychiatric theory and asked to have the girls in one room, I figured it would be something involving a placebo drug (tic tacs!) and anxiety.

What did you think of the episode?

Are you tired of Will and Natalie’s same old love story?

Do you think Maggie should come clean?

Have you missed Dr. Charles’ psychiatric diagnoses?

Should Dr. Choi and April cool it or get pregnant already?


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season Premiere Review – Out With the Old, In With the New (7×01)

Published

on

Chicago Med Season 7 Premiere Review You Can't Always Trust What You See

Something felt off about the season 7 premiere of Chicago Med

It wasn’t just the fact that Gaffney welcomed a slew of new faces,  but more so that the time jump was so forced as it abruptly sent Natalie packing and reinstated Will as a doctor. 

I know that the series tried their best to give fans closure following Torrey Devito’s departure, but since she already agreed to an appearance, couldn’t they have at least made the most of those few minutes of screentime?

Where was she going? Did it have something to do with her mother? And why was Will the one seeing her off? Is it because he covered for her and the stolen pills? The whole scene, much like her exit, felt rushed. 

After her exit, Will decided to ask Goodwin for a second chance since Nat confessed to stealing the trial meds, and Goodwin agreed under the condition that he’d basically become a mole and corner the new doctor, Matt Cooper (Michael Rady), for upselling an unnecessarily expensive and dangerous device called the Vask Comp in order to receive kickbacks. 

It definitely sounds like Goodwin is asking Halstead to just take a plunge into boiling hot water here, but what choice does he have? If he wants his old job back, he has to prove his loyalty. 

And, in a way, the good outweighs the bad as the hope is that his intel will help them pull a potentially dangerous device off the market. 

But why Will? Aside from the fact that he always makes absolutely nonsensical choices, he is said to have a past with Cooper, who used to date his cousin. 

There’s definitely some tension between Cooper and Halstead from the getgo when the latter propositions catching up over drinks. There’s also a weird line about Cooper being a “good boy” in his marriage, which alludes to the fact that he likely cheated on Halstead’s cousin.

And considering that he’s flirting with the lady working the counter, I’d say he isn’t as reformed as he’d like people to believe.

Just what we need — another frenemy for Halstead!

The fallout of the Kinder trial has really derailed his career, and his return to the ED isn’t necessarily welcomed with open arms, particularly by Crockett, another doctor who hasn’t seen eye-to-eye with Will in the past. 

Crockett was forced to rely on his former colleague when he accepted a former Kinder trial patient whose filed was locked. Halstead was the only person who had any insight into the patient’s history, but even when he tried to advise, Crockett hesitated to believe him and went with his gut instead. 

It’s a valid reaction considering Halstead’s murky past, but it was also a battle of the egos. 

This time, however, Halstead was right. 

And while Crockett’s ego may have been bruised, he was able to own up to his mistake. Call me crazy, but I think these two just might become friends after all. 

The biggest obstacle standing in the way of their friendship was Natalie, and since she left both of them in her dust, there’s really no reason to continue this feud. 

I’m willing to bet that if they work together, they can do great things. 

Cooper wasn’t nearly as problematic as Dr. Asher, who somehow, despite crossing every single doctor at Gaffney, snagged the Chief of ED position after Ethan’s shooting. 

Not only are Nat and April gone, but Ethan’s absence from the premiere was reduced to a one-liner about how he’s in rehab recovering.

I was kind of hoping Asher wasn’t going to stick around, but with all the recent departures, Med kind of needs him. 

His disdain for Dr. Charles and the field of psychology, in general, was at an all-time high.  Asher is a vet, so his approach to mental health is rather old school. He doesn’t really respect any Dr. Charles’ calls, particularly when they interfere with his ability to treat a patient. Asher continued to not be impressed that Charles indulged a patient’s fantasies or delusions, though it’s clear he also doesn’t really understand the science behind psychology. 

At the kickstart of the episode, they both made snarky comments to each other about the mishandling of Neil’s case, the man who believed he was living in a simulation and shot Ethan after Asher treated him against his will. The tension between them amplified when Asher treated two identical twins, one of whom needed her ovary removed. Since Jemma and Emma grew up without developing a sense of identity, they were convinced they had to do everything together in order to remain “one person.” Thus, the healthy twin also wanted Asher to remove her ovary, which was obviously unethical. 

Chicago Med Season 7 Premiere Review You Can't Always Trust What You See

CHICAGO MED — “You Can’t Always Trust What You See” Episode 701 — Pictured: (l-r) Kristin Hager as Dr. Stevie Hammer — (Photo by: George Burns Jr/NBC)

The whole relationship between the twins was borderline disturbing, and I kind of wish the series tapped into that more. However, I was impressed that Charles found a way to convince them to go through with the life-saving procedure without dismissing their feelings or beliefs. 

But despite emphasizing that he’s never seen a case quite like this one in his 40 years on the job, he probably should’ve anticipated the old switcheroo. 

Maybe Asher and Charkes will find a way to put their difference aside and learn from each other?

In addition to Cooper, there were two new faces making the rounds at Gaffney: Dylan Scott (Guy Lockard) and Stevie Hammer (Kristen Hager). 

Scott’s a former cop-turned-doctor who loves to share that tidbit with his patients, including a young boy who was bitten by a rattlesnake as part of a gang initiation. My guess is there’s going to be some tie-in to Chicago PD at some point as he told Will that he knew his brother Jay Halstead. 

Hammer, on the other hand, reminds me of Dr. Elsa Curry at times. She’s an emergency room attending that seems very perceptive. 

She also has a connection to Halstead as they attended med school together, so you can probably tack her onto his long list of love interests. Sparks will fly sooner rather than later, I’m sure. 

And since Halstead is a sucker for taking on his romantic partner’s burdens, it won’t be long before he gets involved with trying to help her homeless mother.

Neither of these characters have hooked me just yet, nor are they filling the Natalie and April-sized voids, but I’m not writing them off either. 

Scott, in particular, has the ability to offer a unique perspective as there hasn’t been a doctor that has also been on the other side of the coin and worked the streets of Chicago. 

Maggie’s storyline with her daughter, Taylor, is going to be a bigger focus this season. If I were to put my money on it, they’ll have a decent relationship by the time the season is over.

Though, I’m glad that Maggie is pulling back and following Taylor’s lead on this. Despite wanting to do what was best for Taylor, it was pretty manipulative of Maggie to get close to her daughter and withhold the truth about her identity. 

Taylor deserves all the space she needs, and my hope is that the series doesn’t force this storyline. 

Taylor can be curious about her mother while also resenting her for how she’s handled things up until now. And it’s not a surprise that she wants to focus on her career and not have this secret overshadow all the work that she’s doing. 

What did you think of the Chicago Med Season 7 premiere?

Did you find it struggled to find its footing with the new characters or did it make you excited for what’s to come this season?

Sound off in the comments below!


Continue Reading

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Will and Natalie Come Clean (6×15)

Published

on

Chicago Med Review Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies Season 6 Episode 15

The secrets and lies finally caught up with Will and Natalie on Chicago Med

In the penultimate episode of the season, Natalie’s mother was rushed to Gaffney with liver failure, which both doctors deduced was a symptom of the Kinder trial drugs they’ve been giving her. 

Natalie became consumed with guilt over giving her mom the pills and decided she was going to tell Sabeena Virani the truth about what she did. Before she could get to it, however, Will came clean.

And Sabeena did not take it very well. It’s understandable since Will promised he wouldn’t do anything like this again, and she was on the brink of forgiving him and giving him another chance. 

Not only was it a breach of her trust, but it could also cost her and Will their jobs.

And worst of all, it also compromised the integrity of the trial, which near the end of getting all necessary approvals.

It’s one thing for Natalie to have stolen the pills to help her mom, but it’s another for Will to help her cover it up and get more pills while knowing how much was on the line.

His actions directly affected so many people who could’ve benefitted from the medication.

Obviously, Will didn’t want Natalie to go down for what she did, so he took the blame instead, which could cost him his job and definitely cost him any chance of rekindling his romance with Sabeena. 

I guess it goes to show that Natalie still means a great deal to him. 

However, with Torrey DeVitto not returning for the seventh season, I wonder if she’ll find out Will took the blame and come clean instead. I don’t see her as the type of person to let someone else clean up her messes. 

And if her mother doesn’t survive, she’d be so overcome with guilt that she’d likely confess and lose her medical license, which is also a great way to write her off the show. It’s the only storyline that makes sense. 

Natalie also told Crockett the truth about what she did after he confronted her about whether or not she and Will are getting back together.

Crockett was definitely surprised by what she had done, but he was empathetic after seeing how remorseful she was. 

I’m really digging this relationship between Natalie and Crockett, so it’s unfortunate that we won’t get to see it progress past this season.

How do you think they’re going to leave things off?

Chicago Med Review Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies Season 6 Episode 15

CHICAGO MED — “Stories, Secrets, Half Truth and Lies” Episode 615 — Pictured: (l-r) Dominic Rains as Crockett Marcel, Yaya DaCosta as April Sexton — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

Crockett was being really hard on himself after his lung transplant patient came into the ED with pneumonia. 

Since there was no reasonable cause for the illness just 8 days after surgery, Crockett blamed it on surgeon error. 

Thankfully, April went against his wishes and tested the lung for COVID. Sure enough, her gut was right and the lung was infected pre-transplant clearing Crockett of any wrongdoing. 

Once they were able to figure out what led to the illness, Crockett successfully performed a risky surgery that gave James another shot at life. 

Yaya DaCosta, who plays April, is also leaving the show, and I’m guessing that her character exit will have something to do with her decision to go back to nursing school. 

Both of the ladies will be missed around these ED halls, that’s for sure! 

Dr. Choi and Dr. Asher dealt with an 18-year-old patient who was refusing brain surgery to remove a tumor, which was the only course of treatment to save her life.

It led to a bit of an altercation between Choi and Asher as the former respected the girl’s decision, while the latter convinced her parents to apply for power of attorney and make the decision for her in the case that she went unconscious. 

I know Asher wants what’s best for patients, but he’s really not into allowing people to make their own choices.

It’s hard to empathize with him and his war stories when all we’ve seen is his overbearing, controlling, and judgemental behavior.

Asher ended up being able to convince the woman to get the surgery with by sharing a relatable story (that wasn’t even about his time serving), but again, I just don’t trust him or think he has good intentions. 

He may not have sedated this girl to get her into treatment, but we know he’s done it before. 

And that’s in addition to several other issues that have come up during his short tenure. 

Ms. Goodwin exclaimed that he may be the best man for the job, but she hasn’t seen what we have.

Also, does anyone else get the feeling that he’s lying about going to therapy just to get Choi off of his back?

It was Vanessa’s last day in the ED — can you say time jump? — and Maggie was contemplating telling her the truth. 

As Goodwin put it, there’s no going back from that, so it was a decision that shouldn’t have been made lightly or without Vanessa’s best interests at heart. 

For some reason, Vanessa decided to bring her parents to the ED on one of her last days to give them a tour, and upon meeting her parents, Maggie found herself conflicted again.

It doesn’t seem like Vanessa knows she’s adopted, so telling her the truth would not only blow up her life but also her family’s life. And they seem like such a sweet family!

Maybe it’s comforting to know that Vanessa has good parents that love her and are proud of her. 

At this point, the only reason Maggie would decide to tell Vanessa is for selfish reasons. 

However, there wouldn’t be any drama if she didn’t tell her, and if Vanessa gets a full-time job in the ED (which you know she will), Maggie will be even more tempted. 

I’m still of the mindset that telling Vanessa is a recipe for disaster as she will feel betrayed by Maggie. 

And speaking of disasters, Ramona’s obsession with Dr. Charles could’ve gone terribly wrong at any moment, but instead, Chicago Med took a different approach and gave us a really compelling storyline with a promising resolution. 

Ramona arrived at Gaffney to “hang out” with Dr. Charles, but it seemed like yet another cry for help. 

Except that she wasn’t aware she wanted help in the first place, so when Dr. Charles tried to get her to open up, she admitted that her father molested her and then bolted. 

Eventually, he found her contemplating suicide on the hospital rooftop. 

I know I’ve said this before in a review from a previous season, but why are patients even allowed up there? This isn’t the first suicide attempt. Access should be restricted!

Dr. Charles was able to talk Ramona down, who admitted she just wanted a normal life.

In the end, he took her to a facility that specializes in sexual assault, and it was the first time Ramona felt seen, heard, and taken care of. 

The storyline started off with Ramona acting kind of crazy and ended up with a woman who acknowledged her past trauma, how it affected her in the present, and the desire to get the necessary help. 

Imagine that… a storyline that sheds light on the importance of mental health — what a win!

What did you think of the episode?

What will happen to Will and Natalie? Is Dr. Asher growing on you? And should Maggie come clean to Vanessa?


Continue Reading

Chicago P.D

Here’s When Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD Will Air Season Finales in 2021

Published

on

One Chicago promo ahead of November 11 premiere

It’s hard to believe that it’s almost finale time for the #OneChicago shows on NBC.

Due to production delays brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Chicago Med, Chicago PD, and Chicago Fire got off to a late start in mid-November (instead of the usual mid-September premiere), but that pandemic hasn’t made a huge impact on the quality of the episodes. 

In fact, the shows have been delivering some of their strongest episodes to date! (You can check out Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Chicago PD reviews now!)

However, with shorter seasons on tap, the schedule has been pretty wonky and consisted of several breaks in between, so we don’t blame you if you’re having trouble keeping up. That’s why we’re here to clue you in. 

NBC announced that the shows will officially conclude on Wednesday, May 26, 2021, which would align with their pre-COVID finales even if the episode count is a bit shorter than in the year prior. 


Continue Reading

Trending