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Hulu Reboots Animaniacs, Renews Love Victor, Adds Selena Gomez Comedy Hulu Reboots Animaniacs, Renews Love Victor, Adds Selena Gomez Comedy

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Coming to Hulu: ‘Animaniacs’ Reboot, Season 2 of ‘Love, Victor,’ and Selena Gomez Comedy

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Hulu is gearing up for a promising rest of the year with this content! 

 

Animaniacs Reboot

It’s time for Animaniacs! 

Hulu previously announced that it was rebooting the 1993 animated classic and now, there’s officially a premiere date!

According to TV Line, the 13-episode series will hit the streaming service on Friday, November 20. 

Yep, that’s right — new content to look forward to this fall. 

The reboot will focus on Yakko, Wakko, and Dot wreaking havoc as only they can. Fans will also get to see the revival of characters Pinky and the Brain in season 1. The series was already renewed for season 2 with a 2021 premiere date.

https://twitter.com/hulu/status/1291845044144451585?s=20

 

Love, Victor Season 2

Hulu has renewed Love, Victor for a second season. 

The series, a follow-up to the 2018 film, Love, Simon will pick up right where season left off — spoilers — Victor comes out to his parents. The coming-of-age story’s second season will “push the envelope,” according to co-showrunner Brian Tanen, which makes sense considering the series is exclusively being produced for Hulu and has a little more freedom. 

This is exciting for fans who want to explore themes of sexuality without a PG filter.

If you’re not aware, the series was initially set to debut on Disney+ before the streamer decided the content was too mature and modern for its audience. 

No premiere date has been set. 

 

Only Murders in the Building

Selena Gomez is making her way back to television and comedy. 

On Friday, it was announced that the singer and actress would join comedy icons Steve Martin and Martin Short in a new Hulu series titled Only Murders in the Building

According to Hulu’s synopsis: “The series follows three strangers (Martin, Short and Gomez) who share an obsession with true crime and suddenly find themselves wrapped up in one.” 

There are a lot of promising names attached to the project. Gomez is set to executive producer with Short, Jess Rosenthal, and This Is Us creator Dan Fogelman. 

Our guess is that the trio will witness a murder that they’ll have to navigate without implicating themselves. 

Alex Russo knows all about being in the wrong place at the wrong time, am I right?

No other details were available and a premiere date was not announced. 


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Only Murders in the Building

Only Murders in the Building Review – Framed (2×02)

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Only Murders in the Building Season 2 Episode 2 Recap Framed

Mrs. Gambolini needs to tell us everything she knows!

Only Murders in the Building Season 2 Episode 2 ended with the talking parrot dropping quite a cliffhanger: she knows “who did it.” Is the “it” she’s referring to Bunny’s death? If so, we need her to spill the tea! 

But that wasn’t the only jaw-dropping moment throughout the episode. As Charles, Oliver, and Mabel began to investigate Bunny’s death for the podcast in an attempt to clear their own names, they unraveled a mystery within a mystery with Charles Savage at the center of it all. 

When Mabel found Bunny impaled, she heard her say “savage,” which either referred to Charles or the painting that had his last name written on the back likely referring to the fact that Charles’ father was the subject in the pricy piece of Rose Cooper erotica that went missing and turned up in his apartment shortly after. 

After stating that the killer is likely in possession of the painting on the podcast, the trio knew they needed to get rid of the art so that they didn’t look like murderers, but by trying to sneak the painting back into Bunny’s apartment during a neighborly memorial for her, they simply managed to draw more attention to themselves.

Of course, the plan got totally botched forcing them to leave behind the painting in the dumpster, after which it ended up in Amy Schumer’s penthouse. Oliver learned that she wanted to turn the first season of the podcast into a movie starring in the role of Jan.

To be quite honest, Schumer’s addition might provide some slight comical relief, and I know she’s supposed to be over-exaggerated, but in comparison to the rest of the trio who are just naturally funny, it comes off too forced.  

The real treat was Leonora, Bunny’s mother, who arrived at the memorial declaring that the Rose Cooper painting belonged to her.

Leonora was a wild spirit who loved coconut liquor and could literally sniff out the killer… or, better yet, who wasn’t the killer. And Charles, Oliver, and Mabel were not killers — though, they did know something. I wish that held up with the police! 

She confided in Charles, and a heart-to-heart between the two tapped into some of his childhood trauma involving his father. The painting was such a distraction for him that it was nice he got some answers, even if they weren’t the ones he was looking for. 

Turns out, this whole time, he thought his father was an aspiring actor who could never land a role, but instead, his dad was paying off a bellhop to watch his son while he was stepping out on his wife with other women, including Rose Cooper and Leonora.

Rose’s story ended in a “mysterious death,” and though it’s unclear what actually happened to her, Charles recalls his father getting arrested outside of her apartment building. As he emerges from the building in a bloody tank, it’s a fair assumption that he was somehow involved with Rose’s death. That is unless Rose and Leonora are the same person. My gut tells me they might be. 

The fear and confusion on young Charles’ face is heartbreaking, but it also explains why he has held onto his dreams of living at the Arconia and acting for all these years. His whole life was based on a lie. 

 While none of this explains why Bunny was murdered outright, it does paint a deeper and more painful picture of Charles. It also connects him to Bunny more intimately as they may have been siblings this whole time! Leonora married a Folger, so it’s possible that Bunny was a love child between her and Charles’ father, but she kept it a secret from her husband. 

Charles may be the reason why they are all getting framed! 

Another character I’m not too keen about is Alice Bank, but I think that has to do more with my personal indifference towards Cara Delevigne than anything else because I don’t mind Mabel finding someone she connects with who also wants to help her work through her trauma and provide her an outlet from all this darkness.

I’m even rooting for Mabel to find love, so yeah, I just don’t feel the chemistry between Delevigne and Selena Gomez.

The episode also introduces us briefly to Nina Lin, the new board president, but we don’t know much about her aside from Howard’s interpretation that she’s even worse than Bunny was.

Other clues that will likely come into play at some point

  • The painting is a reproduction and not the original so either Bunny or the killer had it made. 
  • Ursula dumping a ton of paper into the dumpster. I’m not sure if there’s any significance, but it definitely seemed like she was trying to get rid of a trail.
  • Charles says his father died when he was young, but did he?
  • Why did Howard have a black eye? I don’t buy the cat story at all! 
  • Bunny’s grandfather was the architect of the Arconia, and he created a bunch of secret entrances and exits because he was a peeping tom. Men.. 

What did you think of the second episode? Do you have a theory? If so, drop it in the comments below!

Only Murders in the Building Season 2 Premiere Review – Bloody Mabel


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Only Murders in the Building Season 2 Premiere Review – Bloody Mabel

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Only Murders in the Building Season 2 Premiere - Bloody Mabel

They will not go gently or quietly into the night. 

The season 2 premiere of Only Murders in the Building was chock full of everything that made the first series such a smash success — witty one-liners, a mysterious death, an array of suspects, and three determined Arconia residents willing to stop at nothing until they figured out the case and made a killer podcast along the way.

Of course, I’m talking about Mabel, Oliver, and Charles, though, when the series kicks off, their mugshots are splashed smack dab across every paper in town. 

The tables have turned as they are now the suspects in the murder investigation of Bunny, who was found stabbed to death (eight times, might I add) with a knitting needle/knife.

The bottom line is that someone is framing our trio, and it’s earned Mabel, who appeared on the front pages in a bloody white shirt, the nickname “Bloody Mabel.” Say that three times into a mirror. Just kidding, don’t. I don’t want to be held accountable for whatever happens.

Initially, Mabel heeds Detective Williams’ warning to get a hobby — any other hobby — than solving this mystery as they are still person’s of interest, but it doesn’t take long for the threesome to get all wrapped up in the cozy crime-solving.

Cinda Canning’s podcast, Only Murderers in the Building, actually pushes them to pursue their own investigation in order to clear their names. After all, they’ve done this before and solved a murder that the police weren’t even close to untangling. 

And, not to mention, they all have plans for a future that doesn’t involve sitting behind bars.

Charles is offered a role in the reboot of Brazzos, only this time, he’s tapped for Uncle Brazzo’s, a sidekick to his niece, a refresh of the beloved character. He’s not totally pleased with it, but it is a series regular role, so he’s optimistic about it. 

Oliver continues to live in the whimsical world he’s created for himself. He’s the only one rejoicing at all the paparazzi attention post-arrest, and when he meets Amy Schumer (starring as Amy Schumer), he’s totally on board to talk about selling the rights to his podcast so she can turn it into a streaming show. Also, I don’t want to point fingers immediately, but there’s something really suspicious about Amy, right? Like the fact that she likes murder and calls it cozy? Let’s remember — everyone and anyone you meet is a suspect on this show. 

And then there’s Mabel, who is trying desperately to have a life away from death. The poor girl has been through enough. Bunny literally died in her hands. There’s trauma there, which is why her memory is so hazy from that night. 

As she begins to process, she starts to remember small things, including the fact that Bunny said two things to her before she succumbed to her injuries: “14” and “savage.”

None of those things make much sense out of context, but it would be wise to remember them as they will likely come into play the more that the trio investigates. 

Mabel also has a desire to tap into her artistry, which is a welcome change of pace for her considering she was all about laying low last season. 

When Alice Banks (Cara Delevigne) reaches out as a fan of Mabel’s mural and invites her to a gallery opening, Mabel quickly jumps on the opportunity. 

But — hold on. While we’re all eager for Mabel to have a friend and close confidante around, again, everyone is a suspect. 

Isn’t it a little convenient that Alice reaches out to capitalize on Mabel’s newfound internet fame? She has to know that if Mabel shows up at the gallery, it’ll be all over social media in minutes. 

There’s also the fact that when Charles, Oliver, and Mabel break into Bunny’s apartment (only because they heard her voice, which turned out to be her pet parrot, who will likely provide some clarity on what transpired the night of Bunny’s death, I’m sure), they overhear Uma and Howard discuss a painting that was stolen from her apartment that’s worth millions. 

It can’t be a coincidence that an art gallery owner expresses interest in Mabel around the same time she’s framed for the murder of the owner of a pricy piece of art. There’s also the note Oliver finds informing Bunny that someone wanted the painting. Could it be Alice? Or Amy? Or Cinda? Everyone has something to gain from keeping this murder investigation going! 

The trio eventually escapes via a secret, hidden elevator in Bunny’s closet without getting caught sneaking around the dead woman’s apartment, which would have made them guilty, but you’ve got to wonder why they didn’t even hesitate to take an old and unknown elevator down to an unknown exit? What if it got stuck? Am I being too practical? 

The hidden elevator is a surprising development, sure, but it likely isn’t the only hidden entryway/exit the Arconia has to offer. That place is a maze, and those residents know way more than they are letting on. 

And it would explain how so many things go unnoticed. Like the fact that the expensive art piece ended up hanging on Charles’ apartment wall. 

Why does the killer want to frame him? And furthermore, why did Bunny have a nude painting of Charles’ father in her house? Despite Bunny’s death, we’re going to find out way more about her, and hopefully, many of the other residents. There are so many characters living in that massive structure, it’s time to get to know them on a deeper level. 

I have a lot of questions after this episode, but that only means it was an intriguing and captivating installment in yet another promising and twisted season of this refreshing murder mystery series. 

What did you think of the episode? Weigh in below with thoughts, comments, and theories! 


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It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia – The Gang Buys a Roller Rink/The Gang Replaces Dee with a Monkey (15×03/15×04)

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It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia "2020 A Year in Review"

“The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” is an experimental episode of Always Sunny, flashing back to what basically amounts to an origin story for the gang. But does the gang really need an origin story?

Flashback origin stories (like prequels) are most successful when the information about the origin re-contextualizes something we know about the characters the story is exploring. An example where “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” succeeds is in the reveal that Charlie actually paid for most of the bar, as it re-frames our knowledge on exactly how Charlie became the rat-killer of the joint. Dennis and Mac completely screwed Charlie over, and while this isn’t necessarily a surprising revelation, it does lend us a new perspective to the supposed early partnership between the three. If you want to take it deeper, you can even say it explains Charlie’s hard dedication to the bar that the others don’t seem to have, as evidenced in “Charlie Work.”

Unfortunately, I feel this is the only reveal in “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” that really works. Dee truly earning her nickname as “Sweet Dee” in her younger years, only to be ruined by a bonk on the head doesn’t re-contextualize anything. We already know the gang played a huge role in turning Dee into who she is today through their constant mockery, so revealing that Charlie played a role into turning Dee into “Dee” doesn’t actually change the perspective much. Maybe one could argue that the point is to show how innocent mistakes can have drastic consequences, but in the context of this show, I don’t think that works.

And that’s the biggest issue with the episode. “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” goes out of its way to clean up Charlie, Dee, and Dennis so that we can see the contrast between their 1998 incarnations with their present day selve, and tries to show us exactly what went wrong in their lives to lead them there; but based on the history of the show and the meticulous characterization each main player has been given, we already know there isn’t one thing that lead them to their horrible selves. It was decades of abuse, neglect, self-aggrandizement, brainwashing, and more, mixed in with their own base instincts, and their awfulness continues to perpetuate through the dysfunctional circle they’ve trapped themselves in. Giving a single day explanation to everything doesn’t just feel wrong – it goes against the themes and continuity of the show.

And yet, I’m not sure I even buy that this is canon. The gang are proven unreliable narrators based on other episodes that feature flashbacks. Even when they think they’re telling the truth, their memories often betray them because they were drunk or too caught up in their own egos to realize they weren’t the center of attention they believed they were. For a show that cares so much about its own continuity, I find it hard to believe the writers ever make a “mistake” when it comes to continuity, even if they choose to disregard a previous piece of canon, I believe in most cases that is a conscious choice by them.

So I can’t criticize “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” for “ruining” the continuity of the series because I’m not sure I trust the memory we witness on screen. At the end of “2020: A Year in Review,” there was footage of the gang at the events they claimed to be part, which proved without a doubt that they were telling the truth in that episode. There are no such clarifying pieces of proof at the end of “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink,” so it’s definitely possible this episode is just an excuse to have some fun and experiment with these characters in a new way.

But if this is canon? I think it hurts the characters. I find it hard to believe the Dennis in this episode ever called himself a Golden God while in high school, or that Dee turned out as this sweet after being relentlessly bullied for her back brace (after all, we’ve already seen how much resentment she held onto from that time of her life). Those earlier details seem sort of meaningless if the gang only became the gang because of the singular night we witness here. I prefer some backstory to remain mysterious, even after 15 years, as the gang is infinitely more fascinating when they are the result of a million different things over the course of a lifetime and not a singular event that created them, because people are more complex than that, and frankly, so is Sunny.

I also didn’t find this episode too funny. Mac’s “mark my words” jokes don’t have a great payoff and are sort of easy jokes to plop in a flashback. Dennis watching Frank have sex issn’t anywhere near as funny as Dennis and Frank’s confusing conversation prior, and with Dennis’ view on Frank I find it hard to believe he would stay through the entire session. Mac dealing drugs might seem like it is in character, but his success with it really isn’t, as he’s always been a fake tough (even here with the broken gun!) and he definitely would have had his money stolen from him way earlier.

I did think it was fun to watch, though! Despite all my complaints, I enjoyed seeing this different spins on such recognizable characters, especially Charlie. It’s always fun to see him be competent.

“The Gang Replaces Dee with a Monkey,” presents such a perfect counter-example to “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” regarding character consistency that I find it hard to believe they were written back to back, but maybe that was the point?

The monkey plot line is alright. The guys trying to pick a vacation destination is some pretty classic Sunny, where a simple task turns into a huge project. Unfortunately we don’t actually get to see them arrive at their destination, so I feel like that plot line didn’t quite pay off because we sort of skip to the reveal. I think an extra scene here with them building the words to write on the board would have helped, even if the words were kept a secret to keep the final reveal intact. The monkey is fun, though.

Dee, on the other hand, has an excellent story that is so completely in line with her character that it hurts to think she’s only this way because she bonked her head. She shows both progress and regression as a person in such a smooth way, which is exactly what I want out of this season of Sunny. After being brutally insulted by the casting director, I expected Dee to either lose her **** with him or spiral into a depression, but instead she listens and learns. Dee! Dee listens and learns!!! Even though she doesn’t grow as a person ethically, not internalizing the insult is a huge step forward for the self-loathing Dee. It suggests that for once, maybe Dee doesn’t care what someone else thinks of her.

This also allows her to recognize that the young actor in her class does care heavily about what others think of her, and Dee sees this as an opportunity for, I don’t know, retribution? Revenge? Catharsis? She finally has someone she can influence and control and, after years of suffering the same fate herself, she knows exactly how to do it. Dee is old enough, and dare I say wise enough, to recognize her flaws; after all, she must recognize her own flaws if she’s going to manipulate those same flaws in someone else.

Which makes her final reversal absolutely magnificent. After getting the call from the director, Dee returns to the Dee of years past, because guess what – she finally got approval. She’s validated, and that validation immediately blinds her again. It’s a perfect display of growth and regression and comes about naturally in a way that is true to life.

The key is that Dee’s character doesn’t change almost at all. She’s still crude, rude, and has no idea what she’s talking about regarding acting. Her small growth is only in her reaction to the insult of her acting ability and her horrific plan to exploit a young actor for her own sick comfort. This is, dare I say, near peak Sunny, and I’m excited to see what Ireland brings us.

Other Thoughts:

  • The gang being so upset about the rink closing down before revealing they haven’t been there in over 20 years is very in character for them.
  • If anyone has an explanation for how the characterization in “The Gang Buys a Roller Rink” fits in with the existing continuity of these characters younger years, please share it.
  • I know the show isn’t medically accurate pretty much ever, but Dee hitting her head and shifting personalities is one of those things that has actually happened in real life, and yet still feels unrealistic within the show. Sometimes, just because it’s true to life, doesn’t mean it’s true to the show.
  • Danny DeVito looked great in the flashback. Almost exactly like Season 2 Frank.
  • I’m really excited to see what the show does with a bit of serialization. I know I wrote an article about needing more episodic TV, but a show 15 years into its run needs to experiment some and I think this is a good risk to take.
  • I wonder how much influence the marketing strategy had on “The Gang Replaces Dee with a Monkey’s” final reveal. Ireland was so heavily promoted in the show’s ads and that final reveal was somewhat built on the audience awareness of what the destination was going to be. I actually think it sort of worked? At least on me. I didn’t put it together that their vacation destination would be Ireland, even though it seems so obvious in hindsight, except there was NOTHING in show to tell me that – me feeling Ireland was the obvious answer was solely built on the marketing. Interesting to note.


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