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Good Girls Review – The Truth About What Happened to Lucy (3×06)

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We knew that was bound to happen, right?

Beth has been like Icarus on this season of Good Girls — she’s flying way too close to the sun.

In Greek mythology, Icarus ignored his father’s instructions and flew so close to the sun that his wings melted and he tumbled to the sea where he drowned.

Beth’s been flying too close for some time now with both Rio and now Max.

Her self-confidence while trying to clean up Rio’s mess, which essentially, is a mess she created because she roped poor Lucy into it in the first place, allowed her to look innocent, but she made plenty of missteps as all roads now lead back to her in the case Lucy’s disappearance.

There are two things Beth should have done immediately following Lucy’s brutal execution: gotten rid of her phone and gotten rid of the damn bird.

Seeing Beth hang onto the phone and worse, try to craft a goodbye message for Max as Lucy, was a facepalm moment. Beth should have known that the first thing anyone would do to find their loved one is t trace their phone. It’s crime 101.

The cops may have not taken the missing person’s report seriously, but Max did, and he traced the phone back right to Beth’s house.

Beth had a sound solution, however, as she confronted Max head-on and explained that Lucy left shortly after sending him the message. When he tracked her phone again, he learned she was in Arizona, which is where the donation facility that Beth, Annie, and Ruby shipped her phone was located.

It seemed like Beth figured a way out of it and she even told Rio they could kick off their operation. Rio was impressed with her “where there’s a will, there’s a way” attitude, and she proved for a moment that she is useful.

But as Beth avoided one problem, she was presented with another — Dorito, formerly known as Lucy’s beloved bird, Au Jus.

Beth should have never brought the bird into her house, but she formed an attachment to it because of her guilt. She couldn’t save Lucy, but she was going to save the bird even if it killed her; it’s one of the only things she can control.

I thought Max would see the bird while at Beth’s house, which would be better because at least she could’ve explained that Lucy left her the bird.

However, Max encountered Dean (a proud bird dad who just found out his pet isn’t dying of cancer but is pregnant instead) at the vet while donating the bird food and immediately recognized his bird.

Of course, Beth can still explain this as Lucy leaving the bird behind for her family, but it’s a lot more suspicious now.

And I doubt Max’s going to buy it. He seemed to accept that Lucy left him, but the bird might cause him to investigate further.

Lucy loved that bird, she’d never just leave it behind. Similarly, she doesn’t strike me as a person who would just run away from a relationship in such a cold-hearted manner. Max’s going to realize that things aren’t adding up.

Beth may be confident that she’s got this handled, but something tells me that she’s going to need Rio’s help shutting Max up.

We may have all been shook by Rio’s decision to kill Lucy, but I think Beth will begin to understand it, especially as she’s threatened by a loose end now.

You get into a “me or them” mentality.

Rio felt absolutely no remorse for killing Lucy, which was to be expected. “It’s just business, darling” was his excuse, and we can’t argue with it. It is business for Rio, which is also a necessary reminder that Beth cannot get caught up in the emotional aspects of it with Rio again.

Rio Did Something Bad on ‘Good Girls’ and We Have to Stop Shipping Him

She keeps having the same convo with Rio over and over again. She keeps being shocked by his ruthless approach and he keeps explaining that this is how the business works.

She’s looking for some shred of humanity, but Rio isn’t going to give it to her. Especially not after she attempted to murder him. If Beth wants to be not that level with him, she has to prove herself.

Many of us had our doubts about whether or not Lucy was really dead. While we never saw the body — which by TV standards means we should remain skeptical — the fact that the ladies dug up her body to open her phone using face recognition and it worked likely confirms her death. Annie also confirmed it by saying she watched the whole thing go down.

Not only was Lucy’s death gruesome and chilling, but the fact that they dug her up simply to unlock her phone was so disturbing. Annie, Beth, and Ruby are crazy, y’all.

Watching them talk about something so nonchalant and normal as Stan’s court outfit while digging up the corpse of a girl they watched get murdered because of them as if it’s their “new normal” proves how far-gone they all are. Nothing about their predicament is ordinary.

And honestly, would the phone even unlock as the body likely began decomposing? I shuddered just writing that sentence.

Stan had a hearing to see if they’d allow him to become a cop again. Ruby vouched for her man with an impassioned speech that said Stan is a cop with or without the badge. She’s so supportive or her man, but a lot of it stemmed from her guilt that she’s the one that cost him his dream job in the first place.

While Stan got the green-light to return to the force, he refused because he said it didn’t feel right anymore. And he’s not wrong. He can’t enforce the law when he breaks it himself. And he can’t be an authoritative figure if his wife is running around robbing banks, printing fake cash, and what else. Eventually, he would have to come after her and it muddles the waters of their professional and personal life.

And then there’s Beth, who is in way over her head by making deals with Rio’s side boy, Mick. There’s no good outcome here. She’s either going to get him killed or herself killed as she continues to prove to Rio that she cannot be trusted by any means.

She’s also now indebted to two gang bangers, which seems like more trouble rather than a way out, plus she’s got Dean involved.

Some may say Dean has been involved for a minute, but he’s never actively played a role until now when he was forced to sell Mick a hot tub.

Everything Beth has been doing this season can simply be described as sloppy.

There’s also her decision to keep half of the money for herself because the “ink got too expensive.”

On one hand, she’s taking her power back and ensuring that she ends up with something once this is all over, but, on the other hand, she’s poking the bear. Rio won’t be pleased when he realizes what she’s up to.

And he will. He’s already skeptical, and he’s been keeping Beth on a short leash because

he doesn’t trust her. He made that very clear when he said she doesn’t get a say after shooting him three times.

How will this pan out as Beth continues to do things that make him question her loyalty?

Other Thoughts

  • Beth saying, “I have herpes,” when she thought Mick wanted to sleep with her was hilarious.
  • Annie’s experience with several other therapists was weird. Is it really that hard to find someone who will just listen to you?
  • I keep getting scared that Annie will say too much and incriminate herself and the ladies.
  • Josh Cohen took Annie back as a patient, but is it because he sees a woman who needs help or does he want something more?

What do you think Rio’s plan for Beth is?

Will she cause a rift between Rio and Mick?

And what does she plan to do with the money she kept? Is she going to wash it herself?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

TV Reviews

The Boys Review – Lamplighter’s Debut Answers Burning Questions (2 x 06)

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In The Boys season 2 episode 6, “The Bloody Doors Off,” Lamplighter (Shawn Ashmore) makes his first full appearance where he sheds some light on the mysterious Sage Grove Center, his connection with Stormfront, and the tragic history he shares with Frenchie.

As usual, there’s a lot of gratuitously bloody violence involved in this episode as well as some shocking scenes (one of which involves someone getting choked by an elongated phallus) and game-changing revelations about Vought International.

The main focus of the episode revolves around the Sage Grove Center which is being used by Vought as a testing center for stabilizing Compound V with the goal of creating an army of Supes by injecting them into adults instead of infants.

The Boys Visit Mysterious Loony Bin

As it turns out, the hospital is run by Stormfront on behalf of Vought where she supervises Lamplighter, who is ordered to burn test subjects when they’re no longer needed.

This is a startling revelation, along with the fact that Stormfront admits to Homelander that she was born on 1919 in Berlin, Germany during the Nazi regime. During which she fell in love and married Frederick Vought and learned everything he knew.

She then became the first successful test subject for Compound V – essentially making her the original Supe, which explains why she is so powerful and able to manipulate her way around Vought so easily.

Moreover, her Nazism has extended throughout her time behind the scenes, and sees Homelander as “everything [she and Frederick Vought] dreamed of.” Implying that the goal of Compound V coincides with Nazi values – Yikes!

Fortunately for Billy and The Boys, Lamplighter is more amiable than they expected and is willing to atone for his sins and work with them.

Lamplighter and Frenchie’s Traumatic History

After the patients of Sage Grove Center accidentally break out, Lamplighter, MM, Frenchie and Kimiko find themselves trapped in the hospital with a bunch of unstable and dangerous Supes. One of which is a patient named Cindy who shows considerably dangerous psychokinetic powers – she is shown at the end of the episode hitchhiking and could be a factor later in the season.

Cindy (portrayed by Ess Hödlmoser) debuts in this episode.

On a more humorous note, MM has an unpleasant encounter with a Supe patient who has the unseemly power to control his elongated elastic phallus, which he wraps around MM while trying to choke him out. (So yeah, this show is basically pure insanity at this point.)

The main takeaway from their time at the hospital, however, is the confrontation between Lamplighter and Frenchie who are finally able to discuss face-to-face a traumatic event from their shared past that has haunted both of them for years.

During Lamplighter’s time with The Seven, he is blackmailed by Colonel Mallory and The Boys to be their mole at Vought Tower. Their association ends in tragedy, however, when Lamplighter attempts to assassinate Mallory in her sleep to try and get out of their arrangement but instead mistakenly burns her innocent grandchildren instead.

To make things worse, Mallory tasked Frenchie to track Lamplighter on the night of this event but he is sidetracked into rescuing his best friend from overdosing and was unable to prevent Lamplighter from committing the horrible act.

So essentially, both Frenchie and Lamplighter blame themselves for the deaths of the children.

Other Key Events In This Episode

  • Starlight removes the chip implanted by Vought on her with the help of Frenchie, and she has a heartfelt hug with Kimiko.
  • The Deep invites A-Train to join the Church of the Collective.
  • Elena discovers a video (dropped off by Deep) of Maeve and Homelander abandoning the falling airplane from season 1, which Maeve plans to use as blackmail against Homelander.
  • Starlight accidentally kills someone while trying to commander his vehicle when she and Billy needed to take Hughie to the hospital after he sustained injuries caused by one of the escaped Supes from the Sage Grove Center.
  • Frenchie is a huge fan of The Golden Girls and considers himself as a Betty White type. And, of course, the episode ends with The Golden Girls theme song.

Episode Rating: 9.5/10

The Boys new season 2 episodes stream on Fridays on Amazon Prime Video.


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Big Brother

Big Brother All-Stars Review: The Seventh Eviction (22×22)

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Big Brother All-Stars Episode 22 Review

Misreads and miscommunication continue to plague the house, and it all culminates in tonight’s latest eviction, where either Da’Vonne or Kevin will be shown the door, and join Ian in the jury house.

At the Veto meeting, Tyler decided not to use the power, leaving Memphis’ nominees the same. Da’Vonne figured that this would happen, but felt very optimistic that Dani and Nicole could work with her to gather the four votes needed to evict Kevin. The frequent thing that caused Da’Vonne stress was confirming whether or not Nicole voted to evict Tyler or Ian in the previous week. Nicole lies to her face saying she voted to evict Tyler (she didn’t), but said quietly that she will tell Day the truth, but has to find the right moment to do so.

Head of Household Memphis decides to shift his focus onto the next phase of the game, and created two sub-alliances within the Committee. He lets Enzo know that he is going to form two final 3 deals, but have Enzo in both, so that his final 2 deal is with Enzo. That way if the Committee crumbles, he has people to back him up. Enzo takes this deal, thinking that he can beat Memphis in the final 2 should they get that far, and decides to work with Memphis. The first group has Memphis, Enzo, and Cody, and the other has Memphis, Enzo, and Christmas. Memphis calls both alliances “The Wise Guys.” All I have to say is that even though Memphis should not win this game, this is pretty smart. He has a feeling that the Committee is falling apart, so finding smaller groups to take to the end could help him. I hope it all falls in his face, because that jerk (putting it lightly) needs to go now.

Dani believes that keeping Da’Vonne is what’s best for her game, so she starts going around trying to get the votes. Christmas sees right through the campaign, and believes that Dani, Nicole, and Day are working together to destroy the Committee from the inside. She then goes to David and lets him know that she knows that David voted out Tyler, and that Nicole is lying to Day, so that Day can target him, and the only way to stop it is to send her out. David is happy that someone finally agrees with him, since his vote was seen as a lie throughout the entire week. Now David wants to work with Christmas which is dumb, because Christmas is a horrible player, and she’ll vote him out without losing any sleep.

Before the vote, Da’Vonne gave a brilliant speech about how no Black women has ever won this game, except for Tamar Braxton, who won the celebrity version of Big Brother a few years back. She declared that she wants to continue to fight to be the first African-American woman to win the show and credits previous HouseGuests Cassandra (season 1), and Danielle Reyes (season 2), as some of the greatest influences to her, and why she loves the game she’s played three times. Kevin had to keep his speech short for time, but had a similar speech, saying that companies and corporations need to do more than a Zoom representation and diversity training, and start practicing what they preach. Both speeches were incredible, and I’m glad that these two took the opportunity of this platform to spark conversations in a world that is much bigger than the house.

Powerful speeches aside, Da’Vonne was evicted from the house by a 5-2 vote. Dani and Nicole were the two votes for Kevin. After Nicole almost tore Day’s earring out while giving her a hug goodbye, she put on her mask and joined Julie outside. When Julie asked how she was feeling, Day said that she was relieved because she was sick of those people. My reaction to that: me too, Day. Me too. When Julie showed the goodbye messages, Nicole revealed that she is a part of a big alliance, and that she voted to evict Ian to protect the alliance. In that moment, Da’Vonne lost all respect for Nicole, saying that if she had just told the truth from the get-go so she didn’t have to attack David, she would’ve been okay with the decision. She now heads off to join Ian in the jury house, where they will wait the next evictee.

Before the episode ended, Julie revealed not one, but two large twists coming for the week. As teased, a BB legend is moving in next door, and that legend was revealed to be Dr. Will Kirby, the winner of season 2, and one of the first villains to play the game. He said he’s living next door, and will be tempting the HouseGuests with power and prizes, and it’ll be up to them to decide what they want. I’m very excited for this, because Dr. Will is a great player, and will hopefully bring some drama and tear up the house.

Julie then revealed a twist that has never happened before. A week from today, the first ever TRIPLE eviction will occur in a special 2-hour episode. That’s right, 3 people will be sent out the door next week, which will cause a lot of stress through the house. I can’t WAIT for this. Double evictions happen every year, but a triple is a first. I hope this will be a time for someone from the Committee (cough, cough, MEMPHIS) to go home.

My New Winner Pick: 
Because I changed my winner pick to Da’Vonne, I now have to pick a new prediction for the winner of BB22. With so few people I genuinely want to root for, the pickings are slim. However, my pick is going to lie with Enzo. He has great relationships with everyone, and joined the Wise Guys with Memphis. He also has won competitions, and no one has come for him in any capacity. I think he has a good place in the house, and I think he could take it to the end.


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The 100

The 100 Review- Only One More To Go (7×15)

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The 100 season 7 episode 15 the dying of the light review

The penultimate episode of a series will tell you everything you need to know about the finale. Will there be enough time to wrap everything up? Are characters headed towards endings that make sense for them? Is the message the show is trying to leave us clear? Based on this week’s episode of The 100, next week’s series finale will likely not meet any of those criteria.

An hour that should’ve been spent on wrapping up relationships arcs and setting up the last big obstacle our characters have to face included a lot of filler moments. Over the years The 100 has introduced way too many new characters that they don’t know what to do with. Any effective character development ended after season four, and we’re now left with a plot that’s too ambitious that we have no emotional connection to.

This Could’ve Been Avoided

And unfortunately, these final episodes are tainted by the loss of male lead Bellamy Blake. It’s not lost on the audience that every other character is getting a death scene surrounded by the people they love and a traveler’s blessing. It leaves a bad taste in your mouth. It’s hard not to imagine how Bellamy would’ve been able to save Madi from her fate. The only reason he wasn’t in that room with Cadogan and Levitt is because Clarke wasn’t able to trust him. It would’ve been nice if she could’ve at least tried to understand where he was coming from. She wouldn’t be completely alone if she did.

It’s incredibly frustrating to see Clarke continuously push the blame for Bellamy’s death on anyone but herself. His faith didn’t kill him, she did. His death is not comparable to anyone else she’s lost. This wasn’t a Finn or an Abby situation. He was still himself and she had many other choices. It doesn’t make narrative sense to show us Bellamy crying and begging Clarke to trust him and telling her that all he wants to do is protect everyone only for all of his friends to agree that he was too far gone to be saved. If they wanted to write a brainwashed Bellamy, they should’ve done it. But instead, Clarke seems heartless and out of character. It’s a shame that Bellamy was only worth anything to the people he loved when he agreed with them.

Octavia only wants to honor the memory of the brother that would give up anything for her. She won’t acknowledge the man who developed a sense of agency and found something that brought him comfort and peace. Even in death, he’s still mistreated.

Under The Rubble

The only good parts of the episode were involving Emori. I’m really hoping she pulls through. She’s the hidden gem of The 100, and it would be a shame for her to not get a happy ending.

Murphy and Emori are easy to root for. They’re a great match. It’s been nice seeing Murphy care for someone other than himself. His desperation to find her underneath the rubble was the most in-character thing we’ve seen this season. The conversation they shared while Jackson was cauterizing her wound was adorable.

I especially liked the part where Emori was describing how happy she was in Sanctum and how she finally felt like she mattered, only for Murphy to intercept saying that she always mattered to him. Who would’ve thought John Murphy would end up being apart of the only good couple left?

Raven and Emori’s friendship was a bit more developed than the rest of the relationships built on Skyring, so their moments together also felt meaningful. Everyone’s become so self-sacrificial lately but hopefully Raven continues to be stubborn and Emori & co. travel to Sanctum instead of Bardo.

What’s The Point?

The entire final sequence was sickening to watch. It’s disturbingly written, and the way it’s shot makes your skin crawl. The 100 brands itself as a series that pushes boundaries and isn’t afraid to face the dark sides of humanity. But there comes a point where enough is enough. The show’s become another egregious example of what happens when you become addicted to making your characters suffer and just end up creating torture porn. What’s the message you’re trying to give your audience? That no matter what you do, you can never be happy? That there will always be worse things ahead?

Isolating your protagonist from everyone she’s ever loved isn’t bold storytelling, it’s just bad. It’s exhausting to watch. And to show a child left behind in that kind of state? There’s no shock value or benefit to going to such a dark place. It just upsets your audience without adding anything to the narrative.

There’s not much else to say about it.

Stray Thoughts:

  • Clarke and Gaia’s scenes felt hollow. Their relationship isn’t developed enough for any of their moments to have meaning. Same can be said for Octavia and Levitt.
  • On the other hand, Gaia’s moments with Indra felt well-earned. They’ve fought over faith for a long time, and they’ve come a long way.
  • Should we be expecting Clarke to go full Daenerys in the finale? Without Madi, she apparently has nothing left to fight for.
  • Jordan always feels out of place. They never really figured out what to do with him.
  • I pray I never hear the words “go float yourself” again.
  • Clarke humming the same song she hummed to Atom in 1×03 when she mercy killed him would’ve been really powerful in any other instance.

What did you think of the episode? Let us know in the comments below!


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