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Good Girls Review – The Truth About What Happened to Lucy (3×06)

Credit: Good Girls/ NBC

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We knew that was bound to happen, right?

Beth has been like Icarus on this season of Good Girls — she’s flying way too close to the sun.

In Greek mythology, Icarus ignored his father’s instructions and flew so close to the sun that his wings melted and he tumbled to the sea where he drowned.

Beth’s been flying too close for some time now with both Rio and now Max.

Her self-confidence while trying to clean up Rio’s mess, which essentially, is a mess she created because she roped poor Lucy into it in the first place, allowed her to look innocent, but she made plenty of missteps as all roads now lead back to her in the case Lucy’s disappearance.

There are two things Beth should have done immediately following Lucy’s brutal execution: gotten rid of her phone and gotten rid of the damn bird.

Seeing Beth hang onto the phone and worse, try to craft a goodbye message for Max as Lucy, was a facepalm moment. Beth should have known that the first thing anyone would do to find their loved one is t trace their phone. It’s crime 101.

The cops may have not taken the missing person’s report seriously, but Max did, and he traced the phone back right to Beth’s house.

Beth had a sound solution, however, as she confronted Max head-on and explained that Lucy left shortly after sending him the message. When he tracked her phone again, he learned she was in Arizona, which is where the donation facility that Beth, Annie, and Ruby shipped her phone was located.

It seemed like Beth figured a way out of it and she even told Rio they could kick off their operation. Rio was impressed with her “where there’s a will, there’s a way” attitude, and she proved for a moment that she is useful.

But as Beth avoided one problem, she was presented with another — Dorito, formerly known as Lucy’s beloved bird, Au Jus.

Beth should have never brought the bird into her house, but she formed an attachment to it because of her guilt. She couldn’t save Lucy, but she was going to save the bird even if it killed her; it’s one of the only things she can control.

I thought Max would see the bird while at Beth’s house, which would be better because at least she could’ve explained that Lucy left her the bird.

However, Max encountered Dean (a proud bird dad who just found out his pet isn’t dying of cancer but is pregnant instead) at the vet while donating the bird food and immediately recognized his bird.

Of course, Beth can still explain this as Lucy leaving the bird behind for her family, but it’s a lot more suspicious now.

And I doubt Max’s going to buy it. He seemed to accept that Lucy left him, but the bird might cause him to investigate further.

Lucy loved that bird, she’d never just leave it behind. Similarly, she doesn’t strike me as a person who would just run away from a relationship in such a cold-hearted manner. Max’s going to realize that things aren’t adding up.

Beth may be confident that she’s got this handled, but something tells me that she’s going to need Rio’s help shutting Max up.

We may have all been shook by Rio’s decision to kill Lucy, but I think Beth will begin to understand it, especially as she’s threatened by a loose end now.

You get into a “me or them” mentality.

Rio felt absolutely no remorse for killing Lucy, which was to be expected. “It’s just business, darling” was his excuse, and we can’t argue with it. It is business for Rio, which is also a necessary reminder that Beth cannot get caught up in the emotional aspects of it with Rio again.

Rio Did Something Bad on ‘Good Girls’ and We Have to Stop Shipping Him

She keeps having the same convo with Rio over and over again. She keeps being shocked by his ruthless approach and he keeps explaining that this is how the business works.

She’s looking for some shred of humanity, but Rio isn’t going to give it to her. Especially not after she attempted to murder him. If Beth wants to be not that level with him, she has to prove herself.

Many of us had our doubts about whether or not Lucy was really dead. While we never saw the body — which by TV standards means we should remain skeptical — the fact that the ladies dug up her body to open her phone using face recognition and it worked likely confirms her death. Annie also confirmed it by saying she watched the whole thing go down.

Not only was Lucy’s death gruesome and chilling, but the fact that they dug her up simply to unlock her phone was so disturbing. Annie, Beth, and Ruby are crazy, y’all.

Watching them talk about something so nonchalant and normal as Stan’s court outfit while digging up the corpse of a girl they watched get murdered because of them as if it’s their “new normal” proves how far-gone they all are. Nothing about their predicament is ordinary.

And honestly, would the phone even unlock as the body likely began decomposing? I shuddered just writing that sentence.

Stan had a hearing to see if they’d allow him to become a cop again. Ruby vouched for her man with an impassioned speech that said Stan is a cop with or without the badge. She’s so supportive or her man, but a lot of it stemmed from her guilt that she’s the one that cost him his dream job in the first place.

While Stan got the green-light to return to the force, he refused because he said it didn’t feel right anymore. And he’s not wrong. He can’t enforce the law when he breaks it himself. And he can’t be an authoritative figure if his wife is running around robbing banks, printing fake cash, and what else. Eventually, he would have to come after her and it muddles the waters of their professional and personal life.

And then there’s Beth, who is in way over her head by making deals with Rio’s side boy, Mick. There’s no good outcome here. She’s either going to get him killed or herself killed as she continues to prove to Rio that she cannot be trusted by any means.

She’s also now indebted to two gang bangers, which seems like more trouble rather than a way out, plus she’s got Dean involved.

Some may say Dean has been involved for a minute, but he’s never actively played a role until now when he was forced to sell Mick a hot tub.

Everything Beth has been doing this season can simply be described as sloppy.

There’s also her decision to keep half of the money for herself because the “ink got too expensive.”

On one hand, she’s taking her power back and ensuring that she ends up with something once this is all over, but, on the other hand, she’s poking the bear. Rio won’t be pleased when he realizes what she’s up to.

And he will. He’s already skeptical, and he’s been keeping Beth on a short leash because

he doesn’t trust her. He made that very clear when he said she doesn’t get a say after shooting him three times.

How will this pan out as Beth continues to do things that make him question her loyalty?

Other Thoughts

  • Beth saying, “I have herpes,” when she thought Mick wanted to sleep with her was hilarious.
  • Annie’s experience with several other therapists was weird. Is it really that hard to find someone who will just listen to you?
  • I keep getting scared that Annie will say too much and incriminate herself and the ladies.
  • Josh Cohen took Annie back as a patient, but is it because he sees a woman who needs help or does he want something more?

What do you think Rio’s plan for Beth is?

Will she cause a rift between Rio and Mick?

And what does she plan to do with the money she kept? Is she going to wash it herself?


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Walker

Walker Series Premiere Review – Cordell Walker is a Stale Texas Ranger (1×01)

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Walker Pilot Review Season 1 Episode 1

Jared Padalecki has held many impressive roles in his career. Some may think of him as Dean from Gilmore Girls, while others only see him as Sam Winchester on Supernatural. 

But now, he’s stepping into the shoes of the legendary Cordell Walker on The CW’s Walker adaptation, a role previously held by the Chuck Norris on Walker, Texas Ranger, a beloved action drama with a premise that’s occasionally viewed as problematic for its portrayal of good guys versus bad guys.

In the 1993 series, the idea of justice was always painted with a black and white brushstroke, but in 2021, we know that’s not the case. 

That’s why The CW’s version aims to stay true to the original with a dedicated cop who takes down the bad guys with roundhouse kicks, while also infusing the modern-day version with more progressive viewpoints. The pilot alone touches on the topic of undocumented immigration and introduces Walker’s partner, a Mexican-American female ranger, along with his gay brother. 

I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect from The CW series going in, but even without fully knowing, it seems I set my expectations just a bit too high… like those famous roundhouse kicks.

Nothing about Walker’s pilot episode drew me in (or made me want to keep watching) despite it being the network’s most highly-anticipated show of 2020, and there’s nothing legendary or iconic about Padalecki’s performance… not yet, at least. 

Padalecki’s Walker is angstier and less carefree than Norris’. He comes with a lot of personal baggage inflicted by the mysterious death of his wife, Emily, which spirals into his struggle to raise his two children, Stella and Augie, without her.

One major flaw off-the-bat is that the writers and creators assumed audiences would care about a lead character when much of the action — his wife’s death and his undercover mission following her death — happens off-screen or in “flashbacks.” Instead, we’re provided context upon Walker’s return 10-months after his mission through a series of “heartfelt” talks with his family that often miss the mark. 

It’s an action series with minimal action that relies more on telling, not showing. It’s a surefire way to alienate a fan-base coming to see a character famously known for being an ass-kicking badass. Especially since we barely see that side of Walker.

Instead, we’re given a protagonist that ran away from his problems by throwing himself into his work while the rest of his family — his parents and his brother, Liam (Pretty Little Liars actor Keegan Allen), who works as a DA in the liberal city of Texas — stepped up to the plate to raise the children. 

Sadly, both Walker and the series struggling to juggle the work-life balance.

In short, it’s unclear what the main focus of the show is supposed to be. Is Walker a man who wants to repair his relationship with his kids? Is he a man who wants to protect his reputation as ranger and focus on justice and equality? Or does he want to solve his wife’s murder, which is strung along as an overarching plot to unravel over the course of the season? 

If he’s all three, the show needs to find better ways of communicating it because right now, it feels stiff and falls flat. 

Padalecki doesn’t seem to have a full grasp on who his character is or where his priorities lie either, which means that while his shortcomings as a father and a ranger are brought up, he shows no emotional depth. It’s a tough pill to swallow for an actor who has nailed the whole “brooding” persona far too many times. 

It’s also hard to figure out what narrative the show wants to push forward. At one point he’s patted on the back and given promotions for being “the best of the best,” but scolded and called out for his “problematic” and “rule-bending” behavior in the same breath.

Walker Pilot Review Season 1 Episode 1

Walker — “Pilot” — Image Number: WLK101a_0140r — Pictured: Lindsey Morgan as Micki Ramirez — Photo: Rebecca Brenneman/The CW — © 2021 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

One thing that’s hammered home is that he hasn’t been a very present father and his daughter, Stella, faults him for it. She may be rebellious, but so far, Stella’s brush-in with the law only serves a potential storyline in which Walker and Liam help her best friend’s parents, who are facing deportation because the crime she committed is now on their record.

It’s also hard to get invested in the mystery of his wife’s death considering we only saw their relationship briefly in the first few minutes of the episode. And it was expected the moment he told her to “be careful.” Other than that, we have no idea what her job entailed or what led to her death, but if we never find out, I’m not going to lose any sleep about it. In fact, I found myself more intrigued by Jerry, the woman that was with Emily the night she was murdered. Walker doesn’t seem to hold any resentment about her involvement and there even seemed to be some sparks flying between the two of them.

The personal aspects of Walker’s life completely overshadowed the case-of-the-week, which was haste and lacking. It was an afterthought when it should have been the selling point for a series pulling inspiration from police procedurals and a crime-fighting icon. 

The case served up a few fight scenes, which yes, included a roundhouse kick, but it mostly allowed Walker and his new partner, Micki, to get to know each other and connect, a little too quickly, if I might add. Instead of giving their partnership time to evolve, it seemed expedited and by the end of the hour, Micki attempts to be the “buddy cop” next to Walker’s brooding one. They even banter as though they’ve been partners for years, which feels off considering she scolded him for his behavior, which also seems misplaced considering he outranks her. 

That’s more of a casualty of the writing than anything else because for the most part, Micki sells is more intriguing as a character even with limited screen time. She has more riding on the line than Walker, and one could make the case that she should’ve been the lead of the series rather than being reduced to a conflicted, emotionless man’s sidekick. Not only is she more secure and confident, but she’s also complex. She worked hard to climb the ranks as a woman in a male-dominated career, and she won’t let Walker screw that up for her. In addition to validating her career choices to her family, she also wants to prove herself to a system that would love to see her fail.

The case resulted in a mind-numbingly generic storyline about a drug cartel, which may or may not serve as a future plotline. And that right there is the biggest issue. A pilot episode is supposed to sell you the idea of better episodes in the future. It’s supposed to entice you into coming back again, but the identity of the series was so vague, we don’t actually know what we should expect from it (and Walker) moving forward. It’s equal parts something we’ve already seen before and equal parts forgettable. 

iZombie, for example, adopted a case-of-the-week format that fed into the overarching plot more and more with each passing episode.

Walker can succeed if it finds the right balance of action scenes, intriguing cases, personal development, and a stellar supporting cast. But so far, it hasn’t sold us any of that. 

And Padalecki can’t rely on his fans from shows prior to make this a hit. 

What did you think of the pilot episode?


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Nancy Drew

Nancy Drew Premiere Review – A New Mystery Unfolds (2×01)

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Nancy Drew Premiere - The Search for the Midnight Wraith (2x01)

A new mystery unfolds as Nancy Drew kicks off its second season. 

Competing with the spine-tingling Lucy Sable mystery is a tall order, but it’s a challenge that the writers and the Drew Crew are up for! The Nancy Drew Season 2 premiere delivers an exceptional mystery with the same amount of scares we’ve come to expect. 

Though the Drew Crew tackles a brand-new case when a mystery woman runs out from a forest and mutters Nancy’s name, it all ties back to the Aglaeca curse introduced in the latter half of the first season. 

For those who don’t remember, here’s a quick refresher: Nancy and friends performed a ritual that upset a vengeful sea spirit. When they failed to pay the blood toll, it not only killed Nancy’s boyfriend, Owen Marvin, but it triggered a deadly curse that saw the rest of the group having visions of their untimely death: Bess was burned alive, Ace was hung on a meat hook, George and Ned drowned in his pick-up, and Nancy fell off the cliff just like her late mother, Lucy.

So it’s not surprising that their main priority is to stop the Aglaeca curse before it wipes them off of the face of Horsehoe Bay. 

But how does one even begin to fend off an evil spirit? With Nancy, answers tend to fall into her lap. This time, however, they come at the hands of Bess, who utilizes social media to get some help. Bess really is the MVP of the crew even if the way she goes about it is a bit sloppy. 

Nancy Drew Premiere - The Search for the Midnight Wraith (2x01)

Nancy Drew — “The Search for the Midnight Wraith” — Image Number: NCD201c_0420r.jpg — Pictured (L-R): Leah Lewis as George, Tunji Kasim as Nick, Kennedy McMann as Nancy and Maddison Jaizani as Bess — Photo: Colin Bentley/The CW — © 2021 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

The answers are directly connected to the case of the missing Jane Doe, which leads Nancy and the team to the Gorham Woods during a full moon where legend has it, a wraithe is said to feed on fear. 

The self-awareness of the series is one of the reasons it’s able to sell the urban legends and the idea of supernatural ghosts and spirits haunting the town. The team is all too clued into the dangers of their “missions” because past experiences have proven that urban legends are not legends in Horseshoe Bay. If they know it’s outrageous and accept it at face value, it’s easier for the audience to digest that there’s some creature lurking in the woods ready to attack them at any moment. 

It also allows audiences to understand why they keep putting themselves in danger; they don’t have much of a choice as their very survival is on the line.

Wanting answers on how to defeat the Aglaeca, they locate the spot where Jane Doe, whose real name is Amanda, was attacked, and conveniently find a cellphone with footage of her conversation with her twin brother, Gil, which pretty much clues them into everything that the twin-duo had planned. (I’ll ignore how convenient all of their findings are because it’s necessary to help usher along the story and get some real answers about breaking the curse.)

Other items they find to help them solve the mystery include an insulin pump, which forces them to race against the clock because if they don’t find Gil in time, he won’t make it to give them they answers they’re looking for or the mirror her promised that can break the curse.

QUIZ: Which ‘Nancy Drew’ Character Are You?

Ace, who clearly knows the grounds better than anyone thanks to his boy scout days, suggests that maybe Gil ran to the hunting lodge in the area. 

And again, that conveniently connects to the Hudson family. Then again, what in this town doesn’t? 

The Hudsons – which we now know is Nancy’s biological family – have their hand in everything. This is why you never trust a town’s founding families. 

Including the Hudsons in this mystery is very clearly a ploy to include Ryan Hudson in Nancy’s life in a meaningful way. They have a lot of catching up to do, and if he’s not included in her mysteries, there wouldn’t really be a chance for them to get to know each other. 

But he also comes to her aide twice in the premiere episode, so maybe having a Hudson on her side will prove to be beneficial or, at the very least, to get her out of trouble, which she always seems to find herself in.

The first time around, Ryan protects her and her friends after they trespass on Everrett’s property. The second time, when Nancy is arrested for “stealing” the mirror, a Hudson family heirloom, he bails her out. 

For now, Nancy’s identity is a secret that only a handful of people know about in this town, but it’s a powerful weapon, especially for Ryan, who proves that while he’s trying to make good with his biological daughter, he isn’t above “threatening” her adoptive father, Carson Drew. 

This makes is harder to root for Ryan since he teeters the line of being a good guy versus being just like his father. However, his hostility towards Carson is understandable as he was stripped of being a father and lied to his whole life by someone he trusted. Their beef isn’t just going to go away, but eventually, they’ll have to put their differences aside for Nancy and to take down Everrett.

I can’t help but feel for Carson, who not only had his reputation ruined by being accused of a murder he didn’t commit, but is now on the outs with his daughter because he did what he thought best. Nancy may feel betrayed, but Carson thought he was protecting her and acting in her best interest. At some point, she has to acknowledge that. He’s always been a good dad to her.

Nancy Drew Premiere - The Search for the Midnight Wraith (2x01)

Nancy Drew — “The Search for the Midnight Wraith” — Image Number: NCD201e_000945r2.jpg — Pictured: Riley Smith as Ryan — Photo: Colin Bentley/The CW — © 2021 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Nancy also doesn’t want her true identity getting out simply out of the fear that people will think she’s just like her blood relatives. And there’s nothing worse than being compared to a Hudson. 

When Ace suggests she’s just like her grandfather leading them into danger, it really takes a toll on Nancy. 

Ace may be Nancy’s right-hand man, but his fears and frustrations are understandable, also. This isn’t the first time Ace and the team almost died because they decided to help Nancy. Once again, it’s refreshing when characters don’t sugarcoat that their lives constantly revolve around shady situations that could get them killed. It humanizes the characters and shows that the supernatural occurrences aren’t just something you can “get used to.”

We often wonder why the supporting cast always does everything to help the heroine, and while that proves that they are great friends, it doesn’t mean that she should always expect it from them. 

Nancy attempts to payback the favor by facing the Wraithe alone and saving her friends, but it also comes off as simply a gesture to prove to herself and everyone around that she’s nothing like the Hudsons.

It also doesn’t seem like we’ve seen the last of Gil. He may have a rap sheet and seized the opportunity to extort money from Nancy, but he knows more about the Hudson family than he’s letting on. Plus, there definitely seemed to be some sparks with Nancy as he ran onto the bus to save her. 

And he actually delivered on his promise since the mirror actually gave them the next step to beating the Aglaeca: a sea shanty.

Seeing as Nancy is able to solve any mystery quicker than the police and the newest detective Demora, who is already weary of her probably because of her sleuthing reputation, it likely won’t be a challenge for her. It’s just like solving a riddle only this time, it’s a sing-songy riddle.

But will they find the sea shanty before any of those death visions come true? Let’s hope so!

Other Musings

  • What is Everett Hudson up to? Why does it feel like he also knows more than he’s letting on? 
  • Nancy would have to be blind not to realize that George and Ned are an item. There’s no use in hiding that relationship anymore! I may be mistaken, but I feel like she gave them her blessing back in season 1 and made it clear she’s moved on by dating Owen. 
  • Ace continues to provide tense moments with some comedic relief. Telling Everett that he has a “lovely home” and asking if there’s a “meat hook” in the house were two highlights the episode. 

What did you think of the Nancy Drew season 2 premiere? Sound-off in the comments, Cravers! 


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The Resident

The Resident Review – [SPOILER] Is Pregnant! (4×02)

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The Resident Mina's Kangaroo Court Review Season 4 Episode 2

There are so many relationships doing so many things on The Resident Season 2 Episode 2. 

The decision to move past the coronavirus pandemic has allowed the characters (and show) to do something most of us haven’t been able to do since mid-March — move on with our lives. 

Instead of being stuck in a world where everything is limited and social distancing is mandated, the series can tackle the aftermath of surviving a pandemic, which includes plenty of fallouts (some deserved) and new realizations. 

Relationships are able to thrive and wane all in the same breath, while new journey’s are welcomed without a crippling fear of the future. It’s refreshing and inspiring to see as many of us look forward to a world where we can finally close this chapter and live again.

But despite our desire to get past this, what has happened has affected everyone in some way. And sadly, not everyone is able to pick up the pieces and move on, especially after experiencing a huge loss at the hands of a deadly and highly-respiratory virus.

Let’s start with the happy news first, shall we?

Nic and Conrad are in their honeymoon phase, and though I wouldn’t peg them as Key West people, I am a bit bummed that we didn’t get to see any part of their honeymoon. Most of the action takes place in the hospital setting, so it would have been nice to see them enjoying their freedom. However, I imagine that would’ve been hard to film these days. 

Their romance is still on level 10, which is a welcome change for Nic and Conrad, who haven’t always been on the same page. Hearing her refer to Conrad as her husband is something we’re all going to have to get used to, but it does have a nice ring to it. 

If you saw the teaser for the episode, you likely weren’t surprised by Nic’s grand reveal that she’s pregnant. We all saw it coming from a mile away. But what does this truly mean for the series and the relationship? In real-life, having children is typically the natural next step step as a relationship progresses, but on television, a pregnancy isn’t always in the best interest of characters. 

I wish the series would’ve waited a bit and allowed them to simply be happy together for a bit instead of pushing towards the next big-thing. However, it’s also an opportunity for the show to present a couple that is able to juggle having children while not losing themselves in the process or having the children become an afterthought somewhere off-screen.

Since I’m not one of those people that’s opposed to characters having children, I hope the series incorporates the storyline and emphasizes the joys and hardships of being a working mother. 

Are you thrilled by this next step for #Conic? Or do you think it’s too soon?

The Resident Premiere Review – Conrad and Nic Get Married as COVID-19 Hits Chastain (4×01)

Then we have Mina and the Raptor and boy, that relationship is even better than I ever could’ve imagine. They compliment each other so well and allowing them to be fully into their feeling brings a new dynamic that’s exciting and spontaneous. Even when they’re disagreeing and having their first fight as a couple, everything about them is still intoxicating. 

Since they are both extremely confident and driven, it’s going to be much harder for them to separate their personal and professional relationship. If anyone can do it, it’s #Minator, but they’re also seeing first-hand that it’s not going to be easy, especially when it involves disagreements about such fundamental differences. 

Cain is a mixed bag, but generally, you’re either supporting him or against him. Mostly everyone at Chastain — and those watching offscreen — are against him. And up until now, there wasn’t a bone in my body that could justify Cain’s actions, but after gaining some insight into the “why” behind his ego does paint him in a new light. 

There’s no excuse for Cain’s behavior, but at least now there’s an explanation, which humanizes him. Cain refuses to fail because the system is set up to see him fail. His actions are a byproduct of a failed system. Of course, one could argue that it’s simply an excuse as there are others of color like Mina and AJ that have found success without sacrificing patients, and that too is valid. 

But it does give us a better understanding as to where Cain is coming from. And as AJ pointed out, if it’s a learned survival instinct, it’s not something we can fault him on. His logic is that if he keeps billing high and proving that he’s profitable then they can’t get rid of him.

And this allows us to understand why AJ doesn’t want to completely destroy the man’s career even despite all the terrible things he’s done.

BLM has been a contested topic in 2020 and the early stages of 2021, and The Resident found a natural way to work it into the narrative. 

We’re also seeing multiple sides of the coin from the people affected by systemic racism. 

There doesn’t seem to be a right or wrong answer here as both Mina and AJ make valid points. Mina’s concerns about Cain’s approach are valid, especially as he knowingly put patients at risk during a pandemic including a patient who got COVID from a surgery that he was misled about, which spurred a string of health incidents. 

Both Mina and AJ followed their gut, and while AJ asked Mina to respect his wishes, she acted on principle; she’s never been a fan of Cain’s, but this time, she couldn’t forgive him for putting a patient in danger simply for his own advancement. 

The scene where they both “agreed to disagree” and took a 3-day break from the mind-blowing sex proves that they have a mutual respect for each other.

However, if I had to pick a side, I’d say that AJ can’t protect Cain from his self-destructive ways no matter how much he believes that change is possible. 

But the truth is, Cain i’s damn good at his job. so no matter what, so he’ll always find a way to justify his actions because he performs miracles that others can’t. It’s a complex situation that is fascinating to peel back. I’m invested and can’t wait to see how this all pans out. 

Of course, being “damn good” at a job hasn’t always meant much to the machine that is Chastain, a hospital that has put profits over people time and time again, even amid a pandemic. 

Just look at what happened to Logan Kim, one of the victims of the coronavirus pandemic. There’s no denying that Kim had it coming. As Conrad said, he allowed the disease that is Red Rock to swallow him up whole. And the moment the company no longer needed him or saw that he wasn’t in their best interest, they chewed him up and spit him out without a second thought. 

However, his warning that something even worse is coming is concerning. What could ever be worse than Cain and Kim? I shudder at the thought of finding out. 

Kit was doing her best to get information, but does the vague answer she got about no one replacing Kim as CEO mean that Chastain won’t be operational for much longer?

It’s one of the “better” hospitals when compared to the experience Pravesh’s late father had at a low-income hospital in a mostly brown neighborhood that was understaffed. 

But if Chastain can’t find a way to turn profit with all that it has to offer, what does that say for everyone else? Or the state of the industry?

Devon is going to need some time to come to terms with his father’s death, but at least he opened up about the pain and the guilt to Conrad. Keeping that bottled up inside was toxic; he was lashing out at patients, which is never okay. Plus, it prevented him from fully grieving the loss. 

Bell’s storyline wasn’t my favorite. It’s always exciting to delve into a character’s backstory, and it’s obvious that Bell has plenty of stories to tell and layers to peel back, but introducing a long lost child is cumbersome.

Bell’s guilt isn’t doing anyone any favors — not himself and definitely not Jake, who was pretty accurate in his assessment that Bell’s reason for reaching out wasn’t genuine. 

Instead, it was the fear of dying alone that was creeping up on Bell. Their encounter was completely unrealistic considering Bell last saw him when he was 12.

Here’s the thing — Bell doesn’t need a forced redemption arc because he’s already been redeemed. He’s done a complete 180 since The Resident Season 1, and seeing him make amends with his staff like Nic and Conrad has been more powerful than his attempts with Jake. 

If Bell were to die, he might not have many blood relatives by his side, but he would have his family. I’d much rather invested all this time seeing Bell explore a relationship with Kit, who has always been there for him and seen the good in him.  

I’d like to say the series was going to let this one go, but considering Jake is a surgeon, I foresee him somehow getting wrapped up in the politics of Chastain and being introduced as an integral character. 

What did you think about the episode, Cravers? What did you love and what did you hate?

Sound off in the comments section below. We’d love to hear your thoughts! 


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