Connect with us
Good Girls Incentive Review Good Girls Incentive Review

TV Reviews

Good Girls Review – Beth is Feeling Incentivized to Hire a Sniper (3×09)

Good Girls/ NBC

Published

on


Good Girls started the episode by doing something that was extremely enjoyable to watch — they juxtaposed Beth’s prim and proper morning routine with the messy, chaotic routine of the FBI agent we saw at the end of “Nana.”

The agent has a picture in her mind of the type of woman she’s trying to “draw out of a cave,” and I can guarantee it isn’t a suburban, chipper, charming mom hiding in plain sight. This has always been Beth’s greatest weapon, but it can’t protect her forever.

While Beth got herself ready to take on the day without a care in the world (though, we know that isn’t true), the agent was clearly not a morning person.

Why does the series constantly make it seem like following the law leads to a miserable, bottom-of-the-barrel life? Is there a reason why every law-abiding citizen’s life looks like it’s a rinse, wash, repeat?

Seeing it from this angle, you can almost understand why Beth’s gotten so deeply involved in the criminal lifestyle, but the series quickly reminds you that the grass ain’t always greener on the other side.

Beth’s motivation and confidence didn’t stem from the fact that that she was rolling in the fake cash that she was washing, no, she was thrilled that they finally had enough money to hire a professional to take out Rio.

Yup, the suburban mom is engaging in murder-for-hire plots and acting like it’s just another Tuesday. This is what her life is now.

You can’t blame her for it either as Rio isn’t just a pain in her side, he’s a man who is destroying her life piece by piece. She’s still sleeping without furniture, they’re still broke, and Rio “incentivized” Beth by getting her fingerprints all over a gun he claims they used to kill Boomer.

Rio is good. He’s really good. And if Beth wants to take the throne and eliminate him, she has to be equally as good.

QUIZ: Which ‘Good Girls’ Guy is Your Soulmate?

Rio admitted her was running out of ways to incentivize Beth, but by getting her prints on the gun, he has the leverage to destroy her if she ever missteps again.

Rio thinks he understands Beth, and for the most part, he’s pretty on point, but his drastic move didn’t incentivize Beth in the way he wanted.

Instead of falling in line, Beth decided to act on part three of her plan.

But as I said previously, Beth has to be really good to pull one over on him.

And while double the price gets her a sniper with arms — don’t get me started on the fact that Max told them his cousin with no arms would snipe Rio for $30k — it’s not like she can check out a Yelp review or see a Google rating for this man. She’s going in blind, and she has to trust that the man who says he can take care of Rio will actually take care of Rio. Hopefully, the guy isn’t a cop or something, though, I can’t be the only one who saw the paintball mark on Rio’s car in the teaser episode! 

Beth needs to be careful because hiring a hitman and giving the “okay to shoot” order adds on a charge that’s much more dangerous than printing counterfeit money.

But back to the cousin with no arms, Good Girls loves to lean on dark comedy to get through the tough times, and it works. I was out of breath from laughing at this whole scene.

When he said he likes to dabble in explosives, and Ruby said “really,” it was genuinely one of the best moments this season.

Beth sacrificed a lot to set up a meeting with the hitman including attending Dean’s award ceremony, so obviously, getting Rio out of her life is of the utmost importance. 

It becomes more evident with each week that she needs to free herself, the ladies, and their families from his grasp.

Beth may think that taking out Rio is the answer to all of her problems, but in life, once you solve one issue, another one tends to pop right back up.

And in this case, that issue is the FBI agent I mentioned in the beginning. The FBI is hot on her trail and she doesn’t know it because she’s so laser-focused on Rio being the biggest obstacle in her happiness.

When Beth suggested they don’t need any more of the recalled nail polish color to gloss the fake cash, I was hoping and crossing all my fingers and toes that it was because she knew something was off. Sadly, it wasn’t.

Recalling the nail polish was the female agent’s idea and it officially makes her more dangerous than Tanner ever was because she’s incredibly savvy. She wasted no time narrowing down the exact color.

She hoped that the recall would lure out the “woman” to get more of the color so that they could ID her.

However, the agent has no idea who she’s dealing with. Beth and the ladies are cheap, which seems to be their saving grace. They’re not just going to pay that insane mark-up. Nope, that’s what normal people do when they’re in need of a product that’s high in demand.

These ladies, well, they take it to the next level.

As Beth is to suburban mom, Ruby is to a good Christian woman. She used that to her advantage by offering all the underprivileged women at her church a day at the spa where they could get their nails — both hands and toes — done. It was her treat!

It was also the perfect cover to pull off a robbery.  Since the salon where the nail polish color was stolen from was filled with women who all had motive and needed money, there was no way the FBI could pinpoint the woman down.

Quiz: Which ‘Good Girls’ Good Girl Are You?

Beth, Ruby, and Annie saved themselves without even knowing, and it’s that sheer luck that has kept them out of any real trouble over the years.

Ruby also made Sara an accomplice when she stole the nail polish by having her fake getting a period for the first time.

The situation didn’t sit well with me at first because Ruby is exposing her daughter to her criminal doings and as we’ve seen before, Sara has also had a few brush ins with the law as she emulated the behavior of her parents that she thought was okay.

However, the moment led Ruby to tell Sara about how she had to do whatever it took, even something illegal, to steal her a second chance.

The realization scared Sara to the point where I don’t think she’ll ever cross a line ever again. It gave her a new appreciation for her parents that she may not have had before. It’s easy to judge someone for the action without knowing the decision behind it, but Sara learned that if her mother didn’t put her neck on the line, she wouldn’t have survived.

When she revealed who she wanted to help with the money from the jar, it broke me — she wants to help the family of the girl whose lung she got.

Sara may have made a few bad decisions, but she’s a good kid. Stan and Ruby raised her right.

I’ve seen many fans comment that they don’t want another FBI storyline, but realistically, how long could the ladies have gone with producing fake cash before someone caught onto them?

My biggest gripe with this storyline is that the FBI doesn’t seem to have any connection to Turner’s findings.

Since they narrowed the money down to Detroit, couldn’t they pull up the branch and see if anyone locally has stumbled upon a similar case? It seems like the most obvious thing to do especially since Turner dealt with fake cash and had a whole case built around them before he got killed. The very fact that an FBI investigating gangs and fake cash was killed should sound some kind of alarm.

I’m assuming the FBI agent will become Beth’s adversary, but what if the series wanted to show us her monotonous lifestyle because she would be the kind of person to join Beth’s operation and got sucked in by the allure of street life?

It’s more likely that she’ll go undercover to get in with the ladies instead, but I can’t say I’d be opposed to a twist the would find her becoming a “good girl.”

Annie was or of the best parts of the episode.

She has the type of personality that connects with anyone, even Lyla, whom she wanted to grill about her relationship with Josh.

After a few glasses of wine, she learned that they don’t get nasty because they attend “Egyptology” class for fun, and used that to her advantage when she forced Josh to face the reality of his feelings.

The one thing you can never take away from Annie is that she’s honest, unapologetically herself, and enjoys life for what it is not what she thinks it should be.

Josh isn’t enjoying his life; he’s living a life that makes sense on paper, which is no way to live.

There’s no spark in it, which s why he’s so attracted to Annie and her wild, spontaneous, and carefree attitude.

There’s a chemistry between them that’s undeniable that he clearly doesn’t have with Lyla. With Lyla, everything is by the book, but with Annie, it’s almost an animalistic attraction that he’s trying to fight but failing, especially when she called him out and watched him squirm.

I think Annie is equally as interested in getting him to admit his feelings as she is proving a point. And once again, Josh has become an unattainable conquest for her, which is how he summarized her behavior when she first walked into his practice.

Where this goes from here, we’ll see, but it was enjoyable to watch the tables get turned. Annie is smart when she wants to and needs to be.

Of course, kissing Greg wasn’t smart, but she’s the queen of bad decisions and her and Greg have a history of falling back into bad patterns.

What really bothered me is that Greg has no respect for Annie, Nancy, or their children. Heck, he doesn’t have respect for himself. He pulled away from Annie not because she was drunk or because it was the right thing to do since he has a wife but because he “does the night feeding” with the baby.

Seriously, Greg. Shut up. There was a time I rooted for him, but it’s evident that he tries to absolve himself of any wrongdoing and always blames Annie for any slip-up.

Her life is a mess, but again, at least she owns it instead of hiding behind some facade.

Wait till Annie and Josh start getting it on and he realizes she’s dating the therapist he paid for!

Other Good Girls Musings

  • The fact that Dean felt bad about himself because he thought Beth ditched him to run to Rio (when in reality she was trying to hire a hitman to save her family) shows just how low his self-esteem is, but also, how he doesn’t recognize how much Beth is doing to set them free from his grasp.
  • Dean never asks where she goes or what she does for Rio, but he has so much to say and criticize her for. Beth isn’t without fault, but he should know what happens before jumping to conclusions.
  • Dean is so hung up on “Brio” that he even made out with Gayle. He regretted it immediately, and it was nice to see him take responsibility and own up to his actions.
  • I actually did feel bad for him when he said “I don’t want her,” and it’s likely why Beth allowed him to stay instead of kicking him out of the house. She realizes that Dean loves her despite everything the family has been through, but I truly hope the writers don’t bring them back together.
  • Stan saying guess no one will watch when the iceberg hits was too telling in light of the FBI revelation. Something bad is coming.

This hasn’t been my favorite season. The season continues taking competent characters and dumbing them down for the sake of getting them into problematic situations to propel a storyline that has already been done.

It’s been painful watching the girls make terrible decisions to undercut Rio, plan assassinations plots that don’t have a very high success rate, and resort to robbing grocery stores like they did when they first got into the business.

They continue making mindless choices when they should be advancing and learning from experiences, even if the stakes keep getting higher.

It seems we’ve come to a standstill and need something to really shake things up in a new direction.

And even if they do succeed in getting rid of Rio, which won’t sit well with his fanbase (plus I don’t think Beth could go through with it because she low key loves him), there’s always the issue of the FBI that’s closing in on them.

They aren’t looking for the men who have been washing the cash, they’re looking for the Queen B(eth) that’s printing the money.

There’s potential here, but again, not if the writers don’t do anything new with it.

And the series should really tap into its strength and give the people what they want, which is Rio. The season has been sorely lacking when it comes to Rio’s arc. He’s become such a “hot” character, both in popularity and physically, but the show is doing him a disservice by reducing him to a few scenes throughout the episode that either take place in a bar or as he walks to pick up the money in their exchange.

We want more not only because we like him but also because we barely know anything about him.

Beth doesn’t need to know everything, but the audience is craving to find out how he got in the game, what his deal is with Rhea, who we haven’t seen in a while, and who that woman was that he met up with to play tennis way back in the first season.

There are so many layers to Rio, and we haven’t peeled any back this season, which almost seems like a waste.

Your turn, Cravers.

What do you want more of in Good Girls? Did you enjoy the episode?


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

Chicago P.D

Chicago PD Review – Is Burgess Ready to Be a Mom? (8×03)

Published

on

Chicago PD Tender Age Review Season 8 Episode 3

Intelligence is kicking off 2021 on a high note. 

Following Atwater’s powerful storyline, Chicago PD Season 8 Episode 3 shook things up and reminded fans of the good old days when the focus remained largely on the case-of-the-week. 

It’s been a while since we’ve seen the team go full-in on a case, especially one as compelling as the murder of Makayla’s entire family. 

While gang retribution was the go-to motive, the case took a surprising twist when it was revealed that all three family members died protecting the little girl from her father, Tareek, who was recently released from prison. 

The case was interesting even without a personal connection, but hinging the plot on a young, innocent girl not only provided an emotional hook, it also allowed the narrative to circle back to Burgess’ miscarriage from Chicago PD Season 7.

Voight was determined to nail down a suspect and get justice for the family, so the “by the book” police reform storyline kind of went out the window. Sometimes, I wonder if the series even remembers the plotlines it’s introducing.

There wasn’t even any reference to Atwater’s situation with the racist cops; it’s almost as if it never happened. 

Saving Makayla - Chicago PD Season 8 Episode 3

However, it was nice to see that Burgess was still dealing with the aftermath of the miscarriage. 

Following such a traumatic experience, Burgess convinced herself that she didn’t want children. It was a tactic to protect herself from getting hurt again.

But after forming a personal connection with Makayla, she began to see the possibilities that she could have it all: a family and a career. 

Her motherly instincts kicked in when she saw that the girl was in danger — motherly instincts she didn’t even know she had. 

It was such a treat to see her in “mama bear”  mode.

Their bond never seemed forced either as Burgess genuinely cared for the young girl and found her purpose in protecting her. She even put her job on the line to ensure that she could stay by Makayla’s side until they found the people hunting her down. 

But it begs the question . . . what happens next? Was this the show’s way of warming everyone up to the idea of a Burzek baby again? 

They already let us down once; I don’t want to get ahead of myself and get my hopes up again. 

Read the full review at TV Fanatic! 


Continue Reading

Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Review: A Malfunctioning Case (9×03)

Published

on

Chicago Fire Smash Therapy Review

It’s been quite a while since we last saw our favorite firefighters take on the streets of Chicago, and they came back in full swing. Quick recap: Boden wants Kidd to be a lieutenant, Casey and Sylvie made out and then Casey let it slip that he’s still in love with his ex-wife. After nearly two months off, it’s time to get back into action.

The episode begins with Kidd and Severide arriving to work, with Severide assuring his girlfriend that he’s going to help her study for the lieutenant’s test that Boden recommended she take. As they arrive inside, Chief Boden is showing Kidd’s protégé, Kylie, arriving for her first day as Boden’s new assistant.

As Casey and Sylvie begin to have a talk about their little hook-up at the end of the last episode, the bells ring, and Firehouse 51 jumps into action. As they arrive to a warehouse that’s on fire, Kidd notices that there are people on the roof that need help, and Mouch, being the great ladder operator, hops on and steers it up. As Casey begins to climb it up to the roof, Mouch notices that the ladder isn’t secure, and Casey is flung over the side. Firehouse candidate Gallo runs up, and safely pulls him up. Mouch, ashamed of a possible malfunction, watches on as they continue to help. Inside the warehouse, Severide saves a man, who demands that they go back in to save a car, which he refuses, and Casey berates Mouch for almost severely injuring him.

At the Firehouse, Kylie gets her new boss a standing desk, which will offer the C plot of the episode.

Stella attends her first meeting for the lieutenant’s test, and Kidd meets the people who are also involved with the test, who are all impressed that she’s there.

Mouch takes the rig out so that he can look at the mechanics of the ladder, and slowly starts to become obsessed with figuring out what went wrong during that warehouse fire.

While looking at the report for the fire, Casey doesn’t think that Mouch should get any extra punishment for the ladder mishap. Severide sees the man he saved in the warehouse, named Ken, and Ken tells him that he wants to get back into his warehouse as soon as possible, leading to the concerned looks from Severide. He brings it to the headquarters, who assign him to investigate the warehouse for any clues. As he leaves, Severide sees the chief who’s in charge of the lieutenant’s test, Conway, and he says a good little biased sentence about how Kidd’s ability doesn’t matter compared to how it would look for a woman to be a lieutenant. He also says that just because she’s dating Severide, that’ll be even easier to slide through the ranks, which infuriates Severide to no other.

Gianna and Sylvie talk boys, and Sylvie brushes off any possibility that her and Casey have any sorts of relationship, and inside the Firehouse, Mouch’s obsession with the ladder malfunction continues with him scanning the handbook. Herrmann, nervous about his friend, goes to a nearby firehouse, and asks one of their crew about a similar situation where a ladder operator messed up and almost hurt someone. The crew member replied that the person in question was so far into his career, he was “going through the motions,” and he was sent to a desk job.

With incredible enthusiasm, Kidd tells Severide that she’s excited to get studying for the test, and he can’t bring himself to tell his girlfriend the horrible remarks that Chief Conway said. Meanwhile Boden tries to break his new standing desk so he can go back to sitting, but Kylie sees through the ruse and fixes it.

Now the part we were all waiting for, Sylvie and Casey have their renewed talk about their feelings. Casey said that his feelings for her are real “regardless of Gabby,” which hurts Sylvie, because there “shouldn’t be a ‘regardless.'” She tells him that that can’t happen again, because she needs to be on her own. Thus breaks the hearts of all of us fans that were shipping them.

Sylvie and Gianna get sent out on a call of a woman who was hit in the face with a drone, and the blades of the drone cut a piece of her nose off (insert some gross and oddly impressive special effects makeup). Gianna finds the piece of the nose, and they assure her that it can be reattached. The person controlling the drone tries to take the drone away, but Gianna knocks it out of the sky with a rake, and they decide to completely destroy it for Sylvie’s smash therapy (hey, that’s the episode title!)

Severide and Ken head to his warehouse, where they find the car that Ken wanted saving still in pretty good condition, so there was nothing too suspicious going on.

Herrmann, Gallo, and Kylie find some of the paperwork involved with the previous incident like Mouch’s, and Herrmann tells Kylie that she needs to be tougher than Boden if she is to keep the job, since Boden goes through a lot of assistants (except for Connie, who was a series favorite before her departure).

While sharing cigars, Casey tells Severide about him and Sylvie, and he says he’s gonna pull back on his feelings for her, for the sake of her, which hits home for Severide, since he is in a sticky situation with Kidd.

Kylie catches Boden trying to sit at his standing desk, and Kylie tells him that he can be strict, because she wants to be tough, and she wants to learn from him.

Herrmann finds out through his searching and that the manufacturer of the ladder system was supposed to have product recalls, and it never went through, and informs Mouch and Casey that Mouch did nothing wrong.

At the usual end of episode Molly’s scene, Sylvie and Kidd discuss Casey and Severide. Kidd notices the weird behavior that she’s been seeing in her boyfriend and will most likely confront him about it. Severide is then shown helping his new buddy Ken fix up the car. Ken even gives him permission to take it on its first test drive. Severide purposely ignores a call from his girlfriend, and he drives off into the night.

The episode was a nice return to Fire‘s roots. Fighting fires, with a fair amount of share between all the side plots. It was also nice to see Chief Boden attempt to work at a standing desk when he clearly wanted to be sitting. The humanity of Casey being so forgiving to Mouch for the ladder mishap was great to see, especially when Casey can be so cold during the job.

Chicago Fire is taking a two week break before returning. What did you think of tonight’s return to the show? Leave a comment below.


Continue Reading

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Review – Chasing Ghosts (6×03)

Published

on

Chicago Med Do You Know the Way Home Season 6 Episode 3 Review

New year, same problematic ED. 

Better yet, same problematic disregard for patients’ wishes from Will Halstead. Does the guy/will the guy ever learn? It doesn’t seem like it. 

While Chicago Med Season 6 Episode 3 was a solid installment for the first episode of 2021, it did raise some red flags in terms of Halstead’s involvement with the medical trial.

Halstead seems to genuinely believe in the trial, so he was coming from a genuine place when he offered it to Reuben, but he was also motivated to find his first patient with heart failure, so in a way, he wasn’t prepared to take no for an answer. 

He wasn’t overly pushy and made sure he reiterated how the trial would work twice so that it was Reuben’s decision, but at the same time, I agree with Maggie that I don’t think the man was in the right space to fully comprehend what he was agreeing to.

And personally, it just feels off to me that a doctor who is benefitting from the trial is also tasked with finding the patients.

Maggie wasn’t the only one questioning Halstead’s motives as his daughter, Maria, was also skeptical and made it clear that she wanted to pull her father out of the trial. 

It was never addressed if Maria had the authority to speak on Reuben’s behalf since he was technically competent enough to make his own decisions, but again, Halstead went out of his way to do the opposite of what she asked because he “knew better.”

The whole situation took a nasty turn when Reuben went into cardiac arrest, which Maria obviously blamed on Halstead. And though he redeemed himself by performing a life-saving procedure, the whole thing once again underlined Halstead’s ego and inability to respect a patient’s wishes. 

It’s frustrating to watch Halstead continuously repeat the same mistakes and patterns because he is actually a good doctor who trusts his gut and his abilities. 

Also, his hair was distracting me the whole episode. Whatever that mess is on his head, it needs to go! 

Ethan Choi’s mishandling of the ED was to be expected. It’s never clear which Choi you’re going to get – the one that follows the rules or the one who bends them to help a patient out. 

In this case, Choi was following protocol after Goodwin put pressure on him to cut costs and make decisions that will benefit the hospital. 

As we’ve seen before, that often comes at the cost of patients. Even as April and Dr. Charles were informing him that something was up with Lisa, Choi wanted to discharge her because they didn’t have the “grounds” to hold her. 

Thankfully, Dr. Charles was able to get through to Choi and convince him that there are just some cases where the right thing and the necessary thing are not the same. 

Profits are important, but so is a patient’s health and wellbeing. If Choi wasn’t looking at it with an agenda in mind, he would have been the first to realize that Lisa’s behavior was strange and required additional attention on their part. 

However, this doesn’t excuse April’s behavior after Choi pulled her from the COVID ward at all. April thinks that because she and Choi have a past that she’s privy to special treatment.

 She only respects him in the role of Chief when it suits her. She took his actions personally rather than considering that he was doing what was in the ED’s best interest.

Her behavior was unacceptable and highlights how desperately she needs to learn to separate the personal matters from the professional ones.

Choi’s decision wasn’t to spite or punish her, and he made that very clear. And it’s not Choi’s place to make her feel worthy or useful. If she’s needed in a different department, that’s her purpose for the day. 

Chicago Med Do You Know the Way Home Season 6 Episode 3 Review

CHICAGO MED — “Do You Know The Way Home” Episode 603 — Pictured: (l-r) Torrey DeVitto as Natalie Manning, Dominic Rains as Crockett Marcel — (Photo by: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

The Lisa/Kelly case was wrapped up way too quickly, which stripped fans from a satisfactory ending. 

I’m not saying it isn’t possible for a missing person to just walk into a hospital for treatment, but it was convenient that they were able to identify her so quickly. Where did Choi actually get that app?!

It would have been nice to get some answers about Lisa/Kelly’s case! How did she get to the hospital? Why was she vitamin D deficient? Was she being held somewhere? Who kidnapped her?

There were so many questions left unanswered! 

If this was such a high-profile case, it would likely garner police and media attention. This would have made for a perfect mini-crossover with Chicago PD

And that’s always been one of my biggest gripes with Chicago Med and the case-of-the-week formula. Sometimes, we get so attached to a patient that we want to know more and see the outcome of their storyline, but we’re left hanging instead.

Also, if Kelly was missing for 12 years, would she accept reality so quickly? Or would the trauma have more of a hold over her?

I guess we’ll never know. 

Nat and Crockett’s flirtatious banter is cute, expected, and welcome. 

She’s clearly trying to break through his tough exterior, which will, in turn, allow us to gain more insight into the character and his past. 

Up until now, Crockett’s been this mysterious man who prides himself on being a playboy. As Natalie peels back the layers, she’s realizing that it’s his way of avoiding intimacy or getting too close to anyone. 

The loss of his child likely plays into it, but this was the perfect opportunity for the series to introduce us to someone from Crockett’s past like an ex-wife or the love of his life instead of just a chick that he would casually grab Sazerac’s with.

Since Meghan didn’t really matter, her whole storyline fell flat.

It did, however, intrigue Natalie, who almost seemed jealous at times. Based on that shoulder rub and kiss, she’s opening the door for something more intimate if and when he’s ready to pursue something real.  

I’m not usually a fan of ED-relationships, but this one I’m shipping simply because I think Natalie and Crockett could be good for each other. Don’t mess it up, writers! 

Natalie’s case-of-the-week may have started out as impersonal, but it honed in on a few very important side-effects of the COVID pandemic. 

For starters, the pandemic has left many feeling lonely and isolated. Her patient faked her symptoms so she could have someone to chat with. How sad is that? 

However, it also highlighted the fact that people are not seeking out the medical attention they need. 

Thankfully, this patient didn’t actually need treatment, but there are so many patients who do have symptoms and should see a doctor but refuse to because they’re afraid of catching the virus. 

This means many patients are going undiagnosed or are being treated when it’s too late. Hopefully, this encourages people to seek out help if something is wrong. 

And please, check in on your loved ones with a call or text just to make sure they’re doing alright!

Chicago Med seems to have found a way to address COVID and issues related to COVID without actually focusing on the virus full-time, which I’m sure is a welcome change of pace for many fans who expressed their disinterest in seeing real-life situations play out on their favorite shows. 

What did you think of the episode?

Does it make you excited for the upcoming season?


Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending

Sign up for the CraveYouTV Newsletter