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Good Girls Series Finale Review Nevada Season 4 Episode 16 Good Girls Series Finale Review Nevada Season 4 Episode 16

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Good Girls Series Finale Review – I’m the Boss (4×15 and 4×16)

GOOD GIRLS -- "Nevada" Episode 416 -- Pictured: (l-r) Christina Hendricks as Beth Boland, Manny Montana as Rio -- (Photo by: Evans Vestal Ward/NBC)

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Beth finally did it. She finally became the boss. 

But it cost her a whole lot. 

On Good Girls Season 4 Episode 15 and 16, (which sadly served as the series finale after NBC canceled the show) Beth ran for City Council and won. She also did her best to bring down Nick before realizing that it was one of the goals she and Rio had in common. 

I’m not going to lie — that final moment of Rio and Beth sitting on a bench together was a pretty perfect ending. Beth finally realized what was pretty obvious all along: she was never going to enjoy Nevada. Her dream of Nevada proved that they could never outrun their problems because they weren’t external, they were internal issues.

Rio pushed the hair out of her face and acknowledged that she finally leveled up the way he always wanted and expected her to. By doing so, he also admitted that he had real feelings for her. I’m not okay. 

If the series continued on, it would have been great to see what they would accomplish next as equals… well, technically, she was his boss now. We would have seen #Brio happen. I’m so mad that the show wasn’t renewed, but I’m also somehow content at least knowing that the two of them will continue ruling the world together. 

Good Girls Series Finale Review Nevada Season 4 Episode 16

Credit: NBC

Beth always needed to stop fighting who she was in order to step into her glory.

However, as I said before, becoming who she really was cost her, including her husband Dean. (Okay, let’s be honest, she wasn’t even that distraught by any of it because she got the job, the boss life, and Rio!) 

After Beth was shot and refused to tell the police who did it, Dean realized that he couldn’t do this anymore and left her. 

The dream of utopia — Nevada — died for Annie also when she was arrested. 

I’m kind of unclear about what happened here, so maybe someone can explain it to me. 

Mick shot Beth to teach her that there are consequences for her actions. It was clearly a call made by Nick, which is odd since Mick is Rio’s boy. But I guess since they were all on Nick’s payroll, it made sense?

Anyway, once Beth brought it up, Annie realized she was in some trouble and forfeited her dream of leaving for Nevada with Kevin and Ben. What did she have to do with the gun that I’m assuming was the same one that was linked to Lucy’s death and thus, had Beth’s and only Beth’s prints on it. 

How was it pinned on Annie?

And wouldn’t Beth be able to get her out with the new powers her gig gave her? That is unless Nick was able to get Annie’s prints off of the keycard she stole from his assistant and framed her that way. 

If someone has an explanation here, I’m all ears! 

https://twitter.com/notebrookepaper/status/1418406464507498499?s=20

If Annie was framed as payback, it would explain why he said that he “hit her where it hurts.” But how would Annie know she was being framed?!

In the end, the siblings were the ones to take the fall while Beth and Rio came out on top. 

And Ruby was forced to choose between being loyal to Beth and Annie or to her family. 

She hesitantly chose her family, and honestly, it’s probably for the best. 

Beth has chosen Rio and a life of crime, but Ruby doesn’t need to be dragged down any further. She was loyal this whole time, but she can move on.

My hope for Ruby is that she successfully gets out of town and opens up her own Hill’s Nails with Stan! 

It’s possible that the storyline with Vance would have continued on into Season 4, but nothing was actually resolved with him in this episode. It’s unfortunate as the series spent so much time investing in his character. 

I would’ve loved to see Dean and Stan take him down for manipulating them. He deserved it. 

Dean has never been my favorite character, but he was exceptionally dense this season. I know Beth’s lifestyle can be a handful, but she’s always been in Dean’s corner. She may be the reason he got arrested, but she was also trying to remedy that situation. Somewhere along the lines, his house arrest stopped being a thing, so I’m guessing that she took care of it by partnering up with the FBI again on the low? Point is, Beth had his back, while he didn’t have hers. 

Dean wanted so badly to trust someone that he ended up being made a fool of by Vance, who was using him this whole time. 

No wonder Dean has such trust issues. 

Admittedly, the fact that Vance wanted to blackmail Beth into plugging his face cream was a bit of a letdown, but it would be something so trivial that got Dean all caught up. 

And that’s yet another reason why I’m so glad Beth ended up with Rio by her side. He always believed in her, and while his methods of pushing her were questionable, he never left or turned his back on her.

If there’s any truth to the rumors that NBC canceled Good Girls because Manny Montana wouldn’t take a pay cut are true, it makes sense. How could the show continue on without him when he’s now closer to Beth than ever before? They are the A-team, so there’s no show without him.

The FBI storyline also felt watered down. It’s unclear how they were able to take down Nick since they were never there on official business, but I like that the storyline revealed that all the money laundering accounts were in grandma’s name. 

Rio knew that Nick would never let granny go down for it. 

Beth and Rio made it very clear to Nick that he couldn’t get away with playing them. Nick tried to use Beth as a scapegoat, but Rio didn’t allow it because that’s his girl. No one messes with her.

But I don’t think for a second that Nick would’ve stayed in prison for long. My guess is if that the show continued, it would have been Beth and Rio versus Nick. 

Overall, I like where the storyline ended up, but the final few episodes felt so choppy that I kept wondering if I missed something.

The road was also frustrating. 

Season 1 was a massive success because the show was so thrilling and revolutionary, however, everything that came after was a bit “meh” because Beth and the ladies constantly got caught up in the same problems over and over. They kept making the same mistakes and never seemed to learn their lesson.

But now, Beth finally reached her full potential. It would’ve been interesting to see it manifest on screen, and it’s a shame we never will. 

What did you think of the Good Girls two-hour series finale?

13 Steamiest Moments Between Rio and Beth on ‘Good Girls’

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    Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

    Pretty Little Liars: Original Sin

    Pretty Little Liar: Summer School Review – Sweet Sixteen (203)

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    Pretty Little Liar: Summer School Review - Sweet Sixteen (203)

    There was nothing sweet about Mouse’s sweet 16 on Pretty Little Liars: Summer School Season 2 Episode 3. 

    At such a tender age, these girls have survived one serial killer, only to be preyed on by another, seemingly more deranged, one. 

    My whole heart hurt for Mouse as she realized that the location where Lola dropped her off for her surprise party was a trap set by Bloody Rose Waters, considering how depressed she was when she thought her friends weren’t prioritizing her birthday.

    All sweet Mouse wanted was to feel special, but instead, she was fighting for her life at every turn—and thanks to some quick thinking, managed to make her way out of the abandoned restaurant after Bloody Rose set it on fire. 

    All those months of therapy went down the drain in a flash as the trauma returned upon the realization that it was happening again—their biggest fears were manifesting. Not to mention poor Imogen is going to struggle between distinguishing reality from her nightmares/hallucinations as Bloody Rose exists in both.  

    The final girls needed to once again prove that they could survive a serial killer. 

    Throughout the episode, I kept trying to figure out who could be behind Bloody Rose. While there’s always the possibility it is actually Archie’s mom, I’m inclined to believe it’s someone who knew what happened to them and wants to continue preying on them. 

    Pretty Little Liar: Summer School Review - Sweet Sixteen (203)

    Credit: PLL Summer School/Max

    However, all of the topline suspects were at the roller rink for Mouse’s actual surprise party—that she sadly didn’t get to enjoy—including Imogen’s crush, Johnny, Noa’s juvie friend, Jen, Tabby’s new work crush Christian, and Kelly and Gregg. 

    There were a few people missing, including Henry and Sean, which I found suspicious. I don’t actually think Sean is behind any of it, but I can’t shake the feeling I’m getting about Henry, especially as it would make sense for the killer to be someone all too familiar with what happened to them last year. 

    Then there’s Ash, who wasn’t at the party but did come to Mouse’s rescue, once he found out about her other “surprise” party from Lola. He seemed very much in the dark the whole time, so I think we can rule him out. 

    I’m not counting out Kelly’s mom, Chip’s mom (who has a reason for wanting revenge), and Dr. Sullivan herself, who knows the liars’ deepest darkest secrets and can frankly use them against them. 

    Murder and serial killers aside, Tabby and Imogen both confided in their new crushes about their trauma and PTSD—and much like in the original, the guy seems like they will be a source of support, which is nice. Everyone needs supportive partners, especially when you’re being hounded by a psychopath.

    Faran owned her power after a terrifying experience at the pool, and while being intimidating might warrant some haters—especially the dude she fired—it was also warranted as he was negligent on the job twice, and it almost led to a terrible accident. 

    And I’ve got to ask, what’s with all the douchey dudes in Millwood? For every good one, there are several around to make derogatory and misogynistic comments for absolutely no reason.

    What did you think of the episode? Is Bloody Rose taking things too far? How will the liars ensure their survival this time around?

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    Chicago Med

    Chicago Med Review – Get by with a Little Help From My Friends (912)

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    Chicago Med Season 9 Episode saw a lot of people overwhelmed by work and life in general. 

    It all started with Sharon Goodwin, who is coming to the realization that her life is going to be a lot different now that Bert is experiencing memory loss. 

    The incident that kickstarts everything involves him forgetting to turn the stove off, but as Cruz informs her, it had a good outcome but may be the first of many. As Goodwin’s ex-husband is treated for smoke inhalation, she struggles to figure out how to manage it all. Eventually, when Bert has another meltdown, she realizes that she’s the only person that can calm him down. Even when he’s disoriented, he recognizes her and feels comfort when she’s around, which again, puts an immense burden on her. 

    As he pleads for Sharon to take him home, she agrees to be his caregiver, a situation that Dr. Charles informs her cannot be permanent. But it’s easy to see why she feels responsible—this is the man she’s loved her whole life who still needs her. It’s almost like he’s regressed to an infant mentality, not really understanding the what and why behind what’s going on. Bert is doing a fantastic job portraying all of those emotions and vulnerabilities on screen, providing audiences with a heartbreaking look at the disease.  There’s no reasoning with him, all she can do is provide care, though hopefully, not at the expense of her own mental health and sanity. 

    Newcomer Jackie, played by La Brea’s Natalie Zea, arrives in the ED for her second shift in a row, when Maggie immediately notices something is off. Jackie isn’t her usual self, and paired with the stress at home and the blood dripping from her arm—a cut she claims to have sustained earlier in the day while leaving the house—there’s definitely room for worry. 

    A quick diagnosis from Dr. Charles reveals that the cut may have been self-harm, as he suggests Jackie is distracting herself from the daily pain she witnesses in the burn unit. This is proven to be true after Jackie loses a patient, runs off to the bathroom to cut herself, and then collapses in Maggie’s arms, revealing scars from previous cuts. Intervention becomes necessary at that point, even though to Jackie, it feels like the ultimate betrayal, but eventually, she comes around to see that Maggie was simply acting in her best interest. It’ll be interesting to see if Med finds a permanent place for Zea on the team as I think she’d make a great addition—plus we all know Maggie needs a new friend around. 

    Dr. Marcel also wasn’t spared from the harsh realities when his celebration over his young patient Colin’s new liver quickly soured when he realized the child had an infection. While he tried his best to advocate or Colin, knowing that the boy might not live to see another donor match, he ultimately had to make the hard, yet right, call and give up the organ to someone who could survive the surgery. It’s not the outcome anyone wanted, including Colin’s disappointed father (this is why as a doctor, you never make any promises), but due to the illness, he wasn’t strong enough to move forward. The final gut punch was Colin asking if he was going to die, making Crockett question every decision he’s ever made. 

    Hannah teamed up with Ripley—while also sealing their romantic fate—to help his childhood friends, Lynne and Sully, welcome their new baby, born prematurely at 30 weeks and not breathing. Thankfully, they were able to save the child, which was comforting considering everything Sully is already going through. They need a shred of happiness. 

    Archer also got a little scolding from Sharon, who didn’t take kindly toward his harsh attitude toward the new intern, reminding him that this is a teaching hospital after all. Turns out, when Archer wants to, he can be a great mentor—and that’s something some students need when they are letting their fears and doubts cloud their judgment and get the best of them. None of us are born with the knowledge and skills—it takes patience and practice.

    Thankfully, in every situation, the good outweighed the bad as everyone was supported by loved ones—friends, family, and staff who truly cared about their wellbeing. 

    What did you think of the episode?

    If you are having a mental health, substance use, or suicidal crisis, call 988. 

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    Chicago P.D

    Chicago PD Review – Voight Becomes the Victim (1112)

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    Chicago PD Season 11 did not come to play! Through the course of 11 seasons, fans have seen it all—and been through it all with the detectives working in Intelligence, but Voight getting taken by the serial killer he’s been obsessively chasing down takes the cake!

    The Sgt. Voight somehow got outplayed—and it’s equal parts disappointing, concerning, and intriguing. These writers know what makes good TV. It’s also a change of pace to see someone like Voight end up as the victim. We always see them in these powerful positions, dominating crime scenes, dictating how situations will turn out, and demanding that criminals and suspects be held accountable, but now, we’re seeing him on the other side.

    Voight has gotten what he’s wanted for some long—facetime with the serial killer terrorizing the streets of Chicago. It’s likely not the way he wanted this to unfold, or how he imagined the situation would go down, but it’s the unfortunate twist that it took as the suspect realized that the cops were on his tail and needed to regain control of the situation.

    What he failed to anticipate is that Voight’s team was following a lead that he thought was no longer viable. Right before Kiki’s tragic death—and it pained me to hear that she didn’t pull through after being filled with so much optimism about the future just mere moments before she was gunned down—and before she could reveal who her informant was, she mentioned a key piece of information that was enough for Hailey Upton to go on. Upton located Kiki’s John, who previously told her that someone in his family was a serial killer, which is how she knew so many of the personal details of the case that weren’t made public. 

    While Bobby wasn’t immediately comfortable with sharing, he eventually disclosed the name of his cousin’s husband, who blabbed about his love of torture when he was intoxicated, allowing Upton to pinpoint lockup keeper Frank Matson. 

    He was right there, in front of them, the whole time, with access not only to all the victims upon cross-referencing, but to intel, cameras, and everything in between. It only makes sense that this person was close to it all having been able to get away with so much. Hiding in plain sight truly is one of the best ways to pull off a crime of this nature. 

    And, now, he’s moved in on Voight, who found himself drugged with some kind of paralyzing agent after his trip to the bar. I wish that before he fell unconscious, he gave anyone on his team a ring to let them know he wasn’t feeling well, but, he tried his best, even locking the door after himself. Matson, however, was one step ahead—as he had been this whole time—breaking in, before creepily checking Voight’s eyes and pulling his frozen body to another location.

    Once Hailey arrived to check in on Voight, she knew something wasn’t right. And once again, Matson takes the lead in an investigation that’s now racing against the clock. 

    The team is currently searching Matson’s place, as his poor wife seemingly didn’t know anything was wrong, though, I’m willing to bet his daughter has some insight. The girl looked like she wanted to spill.

    But Matson has proven time and again to be pretty crafty, so tracking him down might be very difficult, especially with Voight’s life on the line adding additional pressure. 

    Will the team be able to pull it off? I’ve not heard any murmurings of Jason Beghe leaving the series, so odds are they will get to him in time, but the case, which has already taken an emotional toll on him, might leave a permanent mark. To be honest, all I want to see is Voight get his revenge and justice as Matson burns in hell—and as we race toward the season finale, this seems like a really fitting plot to finish on, all while lending itself to Upton’s inevitable exit.  If there’s anything to convince you that a career change is healthy and necessary, it’s seeing your boss almost get murdered by a serial killer. And, as we’ve seen with her vulnerable chats with Petrovic (who I am now convinced will join Intelligence after commenting on the “family vibes”), Upton isn’t in a great headspace to begin with so she’s going to need to take a step back and find something that allows her to move forward without all the baggage she’s been carrying from her childhood and divorce from Jay.

    Also, with Chicago PD Season 11 Episode 12 being Jesse Lee Soffer’s (remember him?) directorial debut, I have to give him a shout-out for a job well done. The episode kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time—and that’s not an easy feat for a show 11 seasons in, but no one knows these characters better than the man who spent so much time on the show! 

    What did you think of the episode? Did you expect Voight to become the next victim? Share your thoughts now! 

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