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Lost Discussion 10 Years Post-Finale: What Worked, What Didn’t, and What Should’ve

Lost/ABC - Photo by Mario Perez

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Lost finished airing 10 years ago on May 23, 2010. Join Jillian Pugliese and Tommy Czerpak as they take a look back at the groundbreaking series that helped usher in the golden age of television, and discuss why we love it (and what we think it did wrong).

Tommy:  Hi Jillian, fellow Lost lover. Thanks for joining me for this discussion. Can you believe the finale aired 10 years ago already? Did you watch it live?

Jillian: Nope, I’m a latecomer. I was only eleven when the show finished airing, and I don’t think anyone that age would’ve been able to keep up with it. I watched the series for the first time about three or four years ago and fell in love. It’s an insane show, but it’s incredibly addicting. I binged the series in a couple of weeks, and have rewatched it several times since. What about you? Were you always a fan?

Tommy: I was! I watched during its initial run. It was an incredible time to be a fan because internet discussion had just started to take off but streaming and DVR hadn’t, so while we had places to go online and discuss (may the imdb Lost message board rest in peace), everyone still tuned in at the same time every week. Each airing was an event we all watched together, which really promoted discussion. Television hype is so wildly different now. Not everyone watches everything at the same time with streaming and DVR, and I wonder how Lost is received by someone who was able to take advantage of the more recent methods of media consumption.

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Lost/ABC

So I’m curious, since you watched Lost right in the middle of the golden age of television that it helped launch – How did you decide to watch Lost amongst all the other great shows nowadays?

Jillian: I started watching Lost mainly because everyone always said it was too hard to keep up with. The legacy of the series isn’t its innovative forms of storytelling or usage of symbolism. It’s remembered for being the show that no one could follow. I took that as a challenge. So, I started to watch it on Netflix (sadly it’s been taken off since) and got lost in the world of Oceanic Airlines and The Dharma Initiative.

Lost can be quite convoluted at times, and there’s definitely plot holes within it, but because of how I watched the series I was never lost following it. I’d imagine if I had to wait months in between seasons I would’ve been much more confused. But getting to watch season four right after the big twist of the season three finale kept me invested. If Lost came out on a streaming service I think people would’ve stuck with it for longer. 

Waiting for episodes to come out would’ve been particularly frustrating when it comes to filler episodes that did nothing to move the plot along (think Nikki and Paulo). But instead, I was able to power through until I reached a compelling storyline that I cared about. 

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For 2004, the pilot of Lost still holds up really well. You can sense that it’s from the early 2000s based on how the characters speak to each other, but it’s not so dated it’s unwatchable for future generations. I don’t think some of the plotlines would fly nowadays, especially in regards to the way the show treats women at times, but it still manages to be an example of what a great television show can look like.

How do you think Lost holds up ten years later? Was it ahead of its time?

Tommy: I rewatched much of the series last year; parts of it hold up incredibly well, parts of it don’t. When Lost is at its best, it’s still unlike anything on television, even today. I think the pilot in particular is a masterpiece that has yet to be matched. It balances its large cast incredibly well, giving each main member a moment or two to develop while keeping the focus on Jack. It makes clear that the island and its mysteries are merely a gateway to explore the characters through, as each scene throughout the pilot provides some character revelation, whether it’s the kindness of Hurley passing out meals or Kate finding courage during their first encounter with the monster.

It’s a perfect mix of mystery for both the island and the characters, and has shockingly little exposition for a pilot. Most pilot episodes require the viewer to play a bit of catch-up, as they have to be introduced to the world the characters are inhabiting, but Lost has its characters getting introduced to the island along with the audience. Overall, I think it’s a phenomenal piece of work.

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Lost/ABC – Photo by Mario Perez

Ahead of its time, though? I don’t believe it was. I think Lost was an exact product of its time and naturally pushed network television forward. The medium had to evolve eventually, and Lost expanded the scope of character work and mythology that a network series could provide. With the rise of the internet and DVR, fans wanted to pause their favorite shows to look for clues and share them online. I think audiences were ready for something new and more serialized – something grander, and Lost filled that need. 

As for its story, it’s a series about redemption, loss, and human connection; age old themes that have existed for as long as storytelling. It’s a (mostly) well told story that has influenced dozens of series with its methods and brand of storytelling since, but I wouldn’t necessarily classify it as ahead of its time.

For what doesn’t hold up? You nailed it – Lost has a problem with its women. I think Kate is at her best in the pilot and the finale, but in between she’s stuck in love-triangle hell with very little narrative agency. Even Juliet, my favorite female character on the show, gets shafted by the love-triangle juice.

Jillian: My biggest issue with Lost is how they handle Kate’s character. She had so much potential in the early seasons, and the episodes that focused on her backstory were some of the best of the show. But then she started to be written as just a pawn between Jack and Sawyer when they’re struggling for power. There’s some genuinely sweet moments between her and each of the men, but I would gladly scrap any sense of romance from the show to get back the character Kate was supposed to be. 

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Lost/ABC

As for Juliet, they did her character a great disservice by involving her in the love-square mess in the later seasons. I did really like her with Sawyer, but her final moments on the show surrounded him and specifically her jealousy of his relationship with Kate. She deserved better than that.

I’ve always found it interesting that originally Jack was going to die in the pilot. Kate was the one who was supposed to lead the group. Imagine how different the show would’ve been. 

But for better or worse, we’re stuck with Jack as our lead. I’ve never been his biggest fan. He became more self-righteous as the show progressed, which made him difficult to watch. What’s your opinion on Jack? 

Tommy: I’ve heard a lot of Jack criticism over the last sixteen years, particularly in regards to self-righteousness, and I have to admit that I’ve never agreed with it. I definitely think Jack has some flaws in how he was written, particularly in some of his later flashbacks (such as when he stalks his ex-wife and the obvious, tattoo propelled tragedy of “Stranger in a Strange Land”). His actions in those flashbacks are not pleasant and do him no favors with audience perception.

On island, though, I think Jack is a great character in most instances where the series itself isn’t floundering (such as the love-triangle shenanigans we discussed above). Lost is a textbook example of how to force characters into situations that challenge the specificity of each character: Kate has no where she can run on an island, Sawyer struggles to integrate with the rest of the survivors and overcome his self-imposed loner attitude, Jin and Sun are forced to address their failing marriage, etc.

Jack’s challenge is the strongest, however, because while the other characters’ flaws are challenged, Jack’s flaws are challenged along with his entire worldview. As a surgeon, his approach to almost every problem is through reason and science, and the island throws both of those approaches out the window, essentially giving Jack a crisis of faith (even though that faith is science).

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Lost/ABC

Jack is stuck in his beliefs because to accept that he is wrong is to accept that the island is more than “just an island.” I don’t see that as self-righteousness so much as I see it as fear. He doesn’t think he’s right, he’s living in denial, and I think that’s an important distinction. There are few stronger character moments in the series than Jack immediately denying that the island disappeared moments after he watches the island disappear.

I think this denial most clearly manifests in his desperate need to be involved in saving everyone; he personally has to be the one to hunt down Charlie and Claire, to find Michael – to be the man who gets everyone off the island. I never viewed this as a self-centric “I am the messiah” attitude, I viewed this as the desperate attempts of a man to regain some control over a situation that he doesn’t understand.

If anyone on this show is self-righteous, I think it’s John Locke. That dude sabotaged equipment, blew up the hatch and the submarine, and threw a knife in a woman’s back all because he was right and everyone else was wrong. Asides from trying to control Kate’s actions half the time (which contributes to the major problem in how the show treats its women) I don’t recall Jack ever forcing his worldview on the rest of the survivors – he doesn’t force anyone to leave the beach, he doesn’t actively stop them from pushing the button – so long as their actions don’t threaten the safety of the group.

I think that most people accept Locke’s actions and attitude because he is obviously right about the island, which also hurts the perception of Jack. The audience understands that there is something special about the island, so it’s annoying to see Jack deny it and exciting to see Locke thrive on it. (To be clear, John Locke is an amazing character and truly one of television’s greats).

Of course, Jack has a massive shift in attitude in the last two seasons when he becomes a man of faith and accepts the island for what it is, finally shifting his worldview and providing the show with a strong series arc and statement, which I believe proves his value as the protagonist.

Jillian: I started another rewatch of the show recently, and my goal was to go into it and give Jack a second chance. Sometimes you dislike the main character just because they’re the main character. I wondered if that was the case with him.

But as I got further into the show I was reminded of why Jack rubbed me the wrong way. He was presented to us as our hero, the selfless doctor who’s going to save everyone. That character would’ve been dull, but at least it’s someone you can root for. Instead, as the show went on, Jack went from the archetypal good guy to a man who desperately needed to be in control of everything and everyone.

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Lost/ABC

He had a terrible savior complex that made him unlikeable. He’s not the worst character by any means, but he’s easy to hate. Especially when he’s with Kate. 

I’ll never understand the hype around that couple, when Jack consistently acted like Kate was a project he needed to fix. I know Kate’s widely hated, and as we spoke of before she didn’t really get the chance to reach her potential before being reverted to a plot device, but my main gripe with Jack was how he treated her. He was dismissive of other characters at times (Hurley and Locke especially) but his desire to “save” Kate from herself was nothing if not presumptuous. 

All the characters on Lost are deeply flawed individuals, which is what made the show so interesting. But, characters like Sayid and Sawyer who acknowledged their faults were far more compelling than Jack, who was in denial about not only the island, but himself.

My favorite character has always been Sawyer. He’s a fan-favorite for a reason. He has great character development throughout the series and provides much needed comic relief. 

But I would argue the best character on the show is none other than Ben Linus. He’s the original antihero. He’s introduced as an antagonist and pretty much remains one throughout the show (I’ll never forgive him for killing Locke), but he’s so entertaining to watch. Michael Emerson’s charismatic performance is captivating, and makes him well-deserved of the role of TV’s best villain of all time.

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Tommy: Ben is an incredible villain, and he invigorated Lost in ways no other character could due to the focus he provides for the series. He’s attached to so many of the sprawling plotlines, even if just tangentially, that his existence ends up connecting a lot of loose threads. The Others, the island pregnancy issues, Jacob, the smoke monster/Man in Black, DHARMA – Ben has a direct connection or hand in all of these plotlines, which helps keep the series together, or at least to seem together.

Because Lost can be a mess. Plotlines are picked up and dropped haphazardly at times, some due to behind the scenes logistics and some due to just plain poor writing. At times I think the only two things that hold Lost together are the thematic resonance that’s fairly consistent throughout the series and Ben barely holding the plot threads in line.

The show was frustrating to watch live at points. Mr. Eko is a badass and my friends and I all had so many theories on how his character would shake out, then NOPE.

Done-zo.

So much of the second season feels irrelevant in retrospect due to so many of the tail section survivors biting the dust. I enjoyed the second season my first time through but the lack of legitimate development that comes out of most the new characters that season really hurts it on rewatch, despite episodes like “The Other 48 Days” holding up as single serving episodes.

How do you feel Lost did with its plotting?

Jillian: It depends on the season. Season one was perfectly paced, and set up the storylines for the rest of the show. But, you’re right, season two was pointless. Ana Lucia was built up to be such an important character who ended up having very little impact on the plot as a whole. 

And then the longer the show went on the more filler episodes they included. We didn’t need to know about Jack’s tattoos, or why Nikki and Paulo were on the flight. But mostly, I feel like the show did pretty well with embedding the different aspects of their story together. 

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Lost/ABC

It can be messy at times. Especially in season five. The time travel storyline on the island was somewhat hard to follow, but it ended up furthering the arcs of the individual characters successfully. 

How do you think Lost did with establishing themes throughout its run?

Tommy: Some shows thrive in connecting their storylines to themes subtlety, some are more overt. Lost is more overt, and for a series as grand as Lost is, I think that mostly works. The show establishes its main themes very early on, with the pilot introducing the idea of two sides, “one is light, one is dark,” and just a few episodes later Jack spouts out his “Live together die alone” speech, which may be the most prominent theme in the series. And of course by the end of Season 1 Jack and Locke have the open discussion of what it means to be a man of science vs a man of faith.

No matter how ridiculous or tangential Lost’s main plots become, the show holds together thematically throughout its run. I’m still blown away by how the writers were able to come up with such an effective physical manifestation of the man of science/man of faith philosophies with the button. It’s so on the nose, but it works because it forces Jack and Locke to explore their beliefs. It’s not just a thematic tie, but a challenge for the characters and a plot point to further the narrative.

The flashbacks are also an excellent structural choice because it helps highlight the themes of redemption and letting go, as we see who these characters used to be vs who they are on the island. By using the flashbacks to show us how characters acted in similar situations previously in their lives, we are given hard evidence as to whether or not these characters are growing.

Characters like Sayid continue to torture people, consistently making the some mistakes, while characters like Sawyer seem to sway between improvement and regression, as we see in his decision not to kill the boar in Season 1, but swift disposal of the annoying tree frog in Season 3.

The flash-forwards provided similar benefits in relation to themes, giving us a reflection of how the island changed the characters, but I’d argue that the flash-forwards were a little more dependent on twists and wild setups, such as Sayid working for Ben, than character development, as the skip in time hides what the character development actually is. I love the flash-forwards, and think they were a necessary change for the series that reinvigorated the show (Season 4 is my favorite season, after all, even if it contains my least favorite episode “The Other Woman”). They just don’t tie in to the themes of the show quite as nicely.

The flash-sideways, on the other hand, are almost too closely tied to the themes. I really believe that the final season and the finale of Lost would have been better received if the reveal that the sideways universe was a purgatory of the Losties happened much earlier in the season. Saving that reveal for the end twist may have kept audiences guessing, but it kept us from understanding the context in which these adventures were taking place.

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Lost/ABC Photo by Mario Perez

I enjoyed my re-watch of Season 6 so much more on the second go because I knew that these were really flash-forwards to the afterlife, and I had context as to why Jack was a believer and Locke a skeptic regarding Locke’s ability to walk again. Instead of wondering what happened in Jack’s other sideways life to make him so positive, I could reflect on Jack’s journey throughout the show. Desmond’s journey to reunite the survivors takes on a whole new flavor when you understand that he’s acting on the “live together die alone” philosophy the show spouted enough times to make Rose want to punch Jack in the face.

So while I think the adherence to the show’s themes hurt the flash-sideways in the series’ initial run because the audience lacked the context to understand it, I do believe they are a valid storytelling method and they hammer home the concepts of faith, togetherness, and redemption (Ben’s storyline in the afterlife is one of the best examples of redemption on the show). Personally, I’m not a huge fan of the concept, but I think it works.

Jillian: Lost definitely established itself as the benchmark series when it comes to utilizing flashbacks/flash-forwards to provide insight into their characters. I’ve always been a big fan of the flashbacks especially, because it helps you understand who these people are and how they got to the island. Sawyer wouldn’t be nearly as compelling of a character if we just heard about how he became the man he hated for ruining his life. Seeing him go through that made him much more sympathetic.

Likewise, seeing the heartbreak Locke experienced every time his father disappointed him was intrinsically important to the reception of his character. We can feel the desperation he felt in those moments, and his desire to matter to someone, or something, radiating from the flashbacks. We could never understand the depth of Locke’s devotion to his faith in the island without seeing where he developed that strong sense of faith from. 

When I watched the show I knew what the flash sideways was going into it, and that’s why I loved the final season so much. If I didn’t know, I’m sure I would’ve been more focused on figuring out what the hell is going on instead of appreciating the character details embedded within it. I loved how the series tied up, and I thought the finale was a great conclusion.

However, it left audiences divided. What’s your take on the finale? Did you like it?

Tommy: It’s so interesting to discover that you knew about the flash-sideways prior to watching Season 6. What else did you know of before watching the show? I know we are a small sample size but considering your love for the final season and my renewed interest in it upon re-watch, I wonder how many other people could have benefitted from knowing the deal beforehand.

I have a weird take on the finale, as I constantly find myself defending it despite not completely loving it. Part of this comes from what I said above – I think the flash-sideways emphasizes the themes and characters of the show nicely, but it’s not how I personally would have preferred they tell the story. My favorite part of Season 6 is the lack of information about the Man in Black and his effect on the world should he leave the island, as it truly defines Jack as a man of faith. To me, the fact that there is a definitive afterlife in the Lost universe sort of pulls that away, proving that faith is rewarded, which for me, hurts the theme.

In other ways, however, it strengthens the themes, which is why I find myself defending the finale despite my distaste for some of it. The Losties literally don’t die alone. That’s fairly beautiful, and we get to see characters like Ben make the right decisions in the afterlife because they grew as people in their actual lives. I can appreciate that, even if I don’t like it.

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Lost/ABC Photo by Mario Perez

Some aspects, though, I just don’t think work. Sayid reawakening because of Shannon? Really? The series depicts Nadia as Sayid’s strongest romantic connection by far, with his love for her spanning the time frames both before and after the island. I don’t want to deny Shannon’s importance for Sayid, but I think I’m just going to. Shannon’s loss was barely felt after her death, especially compared to characters like Alex or Charlie, whose deaths continued to motivate characters like Ben and Hurley long after their demise. Shannon’s death pissed Sayid off for a while, and then Sayid, from a story perspective, just moved on. None of Sayid’s choices or actions past Season 2 seemed to stem from Shannon in any way, so why is she the one he ends up with? 

The reawakenings also reek of clip show to me, which I’m never a fan of. I can understand some fans liking them because they provide a bit of nostalgia but I find them uninteresting for the most part. And the final scene of the church. . .it’s nice to see everyone so happy and together but it also feels a bit preachy to me just by the nature of taking place in a church, even if that church is purposely nondescript. It lasts too long as well, giving me plenty of time to ask where Mr. Eko is and wonder if Walt would be a kid or an adult if he showed up.

My absolute biggest gripe with the finale is its lack of closure for the island itself. I don’t mean answers, I actually think they tried to answer too many mysteries in the final season (the whispers and donkey wheel explanations were lame and I think should have been left unanswered. It’s a magic island for God’s sake. Magic things happen there. End of mystery). I mean the island doesn’t get a goodbye. It’s such an iconic piece of television history that to this day it only needs to be referred to as “the island” to be recognized, and there isn’t even a wide shot of the place in the final 104 minutes.

It irritates me every time I watch it. It makes me want to scream. I can’t understand what happened where the island doesn’t get this final shot. Several characters are flying away from it on a plane and it doesn’t lead to any full view shots of the place????? AUGH. Would this have been so hard???

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Lost/ABC

All the on island stuff, though, I think is pretty solid. I love the ridiculous cork in the center of the island. It makes no sense at all and I love that, because magic island and story about faith. It all works to drive the themes and story home.

Love Hurley taking over the island. Love the numerous callbacks that come about the narrative naturally. Love Christian’s speech to Jack, and love the final shot of Jack’s closing eye. It’s a beautiful wrap up to a story about life, death, and what it means to find faith in others, to let go of your past, and try to be better moving forward. I think the finale holds true to everything Lost as a television show is. Character driven, thematically over-rich, nonsensical, and grand.

I just personally wish it could have found a way to be all of those things without the flash-sideways, but I can’t fault it for not being what I would have preferred. Overall, I don’t think “The End” reaches the heights of Lost at its best, but I also don’t think it’s Lost at its worst. It’s just the end of Lost, and I’m happy with that.

What about you? Did you find any missteps in “The End” or did you love it front to back?

Jillian: Since I knew going into the show there was some type of afterlife aspect in the final season, I didn’t feel “The End” was too rushed in explanations because I understood where we were headed all along.

There’s definitely a level of cheesiness when it comes to the reawakening moments with the couples, but I still loved it. It was sweet to see the characters find each other again, and for all of them to finally find some version of peace. It’s nice when you’re rewatching the show to know that no matter who dies or what happens, they all end up in the same place at the end. 

While that could take away from the narrative impact of character deaths, it’s comforting as a fan. I like being able to watch the great “Not Penny’s Boat” moment and know that Charlie eventually finds his way back to Claire. The choice to have them all literally “die together” was a great way to drive home the central theme of the show, a sense of community. Of course there’s struggles with morality and faith that are more often discussed in analyses of the show, but what makes Lost so great is the relationships between the characters. 

It’s a character driven show, and over six seasons you can become easily attached to your favorite ones. So seeing almost all of them reaching the end of their journey together was very cathartic. 

I also really loved the full circle moment between the final shot of Jack dying and closing his eyes compared to him opening his eyes in the same place in the pilot. It felt like the writers had been planning that closing shot since the beginning. 

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Lost/ABC

I agree about Shannon and Sayid. It didn’t make much sense for them to end up together. All the other couples that had their reawakening moments were much more central to the show. Shannon was barely even in the show, and had very little impact on Sayid’s character arc. 

But otherwise, I think the finale was done really well. It wasn’t perfect, and I still don’t love how Claire was dealt with in the final season, but there’s nothing about it that I have resentment towards. Everyone ended up where they should’ve, and found closure together. 

Except for Ben. But I think it was a really smart choice for him to work to redeem himself further. It wouldn’t have felt right to have him in the church with the rest of the group. 

All in all, “The End” was the perfect end for me

What did the rest of you think about “The End?”Join us in our discussion and comment with your insights, critiques, commentary, and whether or not Jack is the worst!


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Best Tweets About Victoria from Tonight’s Episode of ‘The Bachelor’

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Best Tweets About Victoria from Tonight's Episode of 'The Bachelor'

Week 2 brings tension to the house as the ladies fight for Matt James’ love on The Bachelor Season 25 Episode 2. 

Two lucky women snagged a one-on-one date and being vulnerable and open with Matt secured them a rose. 

And the group date was a full on “paint war.” Plus, Victoria proved that she’s determined to be the villain that makes us go “ugh” all season long.

Here are the best tweets from tonight’s episode of The Bachelor.


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15 Exciting TV Show Reboots & Spinoffs Coming in 2021

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15 Exciting TV Show Reboots & Spinoffs Coming in 2021

Spinoffs and reboots are the gift that keeps on giving. 

The streaming landscape is embracing the idea of “what’s old is new again” in 2021 and well, it’s not surprising. Reboots and spinoffs thrive on nostalgia, and in a time with so much uncertainty, the notion of “good old days” is really all we have to cling to.

Not to mention that many reboots and spinoffs have seen an unprecedented amount of success, which convinces networks and streaming giants that this is what the people want! 

Here are all the reboots and spinoffs in the works in 2021:

 

True Blood

In early December, Variety reported that a True Blood reboot was in early stages of development at HBO. Riverdale/Chilling Adventures of Sabrina creator Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa is attached to the script and set to producer with original series creator and showrunner Alan Ball also joining the project. It’s unclear if the original cast is set to return or make any guest appearances, but based on Anna Paquin’s tweet, which claims she knew nothing of the reboot, it’s not in the cards for now. 

 

Little House on the Prairie

Back to the farm! Entertainment Weekly noted that Paramount TV Studies and Anonymous Content were developing the long-awaited reboot as an hour-long drama series. 

 

iCarly

The queen of the Internet is making a comeback! A revival of the Miranda Cosgrove-led comedy has been ordered at Paramount+, the streaming service currently known as CBS All Access, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Cosgrove will reportedly reprise her character, Carly. She’ll be joined by original cast members Jerry Trainor (Spencer) and Nathan Kress (Freddie).

 

Gossip Girl

This one is tough because can you really replace iconic characters like Serena van der Woodsen, Blair Waldorf, and Chuck Bass? HBO Max sure hopes so. The reboot, set to premiere in 2021, is introducing a slew of new faces to the Upper East Side. The Joshua Safran created spinoff will be a “a continuation of the original show” and follow a new generation of upper-class Manhattan teens who fall prey to the infamous gossip site. And word is, there will be some familiar faces making appearances. Kristen Bell is also returning as the voice of Gossip Girl. XoXo. 

 

Dexter

Dexter is returning to Showtime! The cable network ordered 10 episodes of the limited series which brings back Michael C. Hall as the titular character. The Hollywood Reporter notes it’s a continuation of the original series and plans to air in the fall of 2021.

Dexter is such a special series, both for its millions of fans and for Showtime, as this breakthrough show helped put our network on the map many years ago,” said Showtime Entertainment president Gary Levine. “We would only revisit this unique character if we could find a creative take that was truly worthy of the brilliant, original series. Well, I am happy to report that Clyde Phillips and Michael C. Hall have found it, and we can’t wait to shoot it and show it to the world.”

 

Rugrats

The hit Nickelodeon animated series which ran for 9 season starting in 1991 is returning a decade later with new baby adventures for Tommy, Chucky, Phil and Lil, and Angelica. Many of the actors who voiced the characters are set to return along with the original show creators. 

Both the 26-episode season and the live-action film with CGI characters, which was delayed from a 2020 release to 2021, are set to premiere. 

 

Punky Brewster

Soleil Moon Frye returns as spit-fire Punky Brewster, now a single mom-of-three in the 10-episode series rebooted at Peacock.  As she attempts to get it together, she meets Izzy (Quinn Copeland), a young girl in foster care who she immediately forms a connection with. Freddie Prinze Jr. will also appear in the pilot episode as Punky’s ex-husband.

 

Clueless

As if! A reboot based on the iconic 1995 film is in development at Peacock, per Deadline. The series focuses on Stacey Dash’s character, Dionne, from the the movie and the 1996 series adaptation. It’s unclear if Dash is set to appear. 

Here’s a synopsis for the series: A baby pink and bisexual blue-tinted, tiny sunglasses-wearing, oat milk latté and Adderall-fueled look at what happens when the high school queen bee Cher disappears and her lifelong No. 2 Dionne steps into Cher’s vacant Air Jordans. How does Dionne deal with the pressures of being the new most popular girl in school, while also unraveling the mystery of what happened to her best friend?

 

Walker

The reimagining of the long-running 1990s action/crime series Walker, Texas Ranger is probably the most promising as it is set to premiere on The CW on January 21. Supernatural’s Jared Padalecki will star as the titular character, a widower and father of two who runs on his own moral code. 

Per the synopsis, Walker will attempt to reconnect with his creative and thoughtful son (Kale Culley) and his headstrong, somewhat rebellious teenaged daughter (Violet Brinson) and navigate clashes with his family – an ADA brother (Keegan Allen) who stepped in during Walker’s absence, his perceptive mother (Molly Hagen) and his traditional rancher father (Mitch Pileggi). Walker’s former colleague is now his Ranger Captain, (Coby Bell). Walker finds unexpected common ground with his new partner (one of the first women in Texas Rangers’ history) played by Lindsey Morgan, while growing increasingly suspicious about the circumstances surrounding his wife’s death.

Check out the trailer below:

 

Sex and the City

HBO Max is looking to return to its roots with a reboot of its mega-successful dramedy Sex and the City. Deadline confirmed it would be a limited series. However, not all the ladies have signed on for the project. The New York Post notes that while Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis and Cynthia Nixon are interested in reprising their characters, Kim Cattrall is not. Will that sway audiences?

 

A League of Their Own

Amazon gave a series order to the reboot hailing from Broad City‘s Abbi Jacobson and Will Graham, per The Hollywood Reporter. It will be a reinterpretation of the original film based on the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League while exploring themes of race and sexuality amid the women carving their own path. Jacobson, Chanté Adams, D’Arcy Carden, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Kelly McCormack, Roberta Colindrez and Priscilla Delgado will star. 

 

Old-ish

The “ish” franchise continues to grow. First there was Black-ish, then there was Grown-ish, followed by Mixed-ish, and now, there’s Old-ish. ABC is developing the spinoff with Laurence Fishburne and Jenifer Lewis reprising their roles as Earl “Pops” Johnson and Ruby Johnson, the parents of Anthony Anderson’s Dre. 

 

The Book of Boba Fett

Riding on the success of The Mandalorian, Disney+ announced the spinoff centered on Bounty Hunter Boba Fett during the series’ second season finale. The Book of Boba Fett is set to debut in December 2021. Temuera Morrison will return from the prequel trilogy, with Ming-Na Wen joining him as Fennec Shand.

 

Law & Order: Organized Crime

Law & Order: SVU is one of NBC’s most-successful and longest-running scripted dramas. Dick Wolf, responsible for a handful of TV shows including #OneChicago, hopes the Christopher Meloni spinoff, which has been delayed due to the COVID pandemic, will also bring in the eyeballs. Meloni is set to reprise his role of Elliot Stabler. Expect plenty of crossovers – that’s NBC’s thing! 

 

Pretty Little Liars: Original Sin

A… is that you? HBO Max has ordered a reimagined version of the ABC Family/ Freeform hit, Pretty Little Liars from Riverdale showrunner Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Original creator Marlene King is not involved. 

Per the synopsis: “Twenty years ago, a series of tragic events almost ripped the blue-collar town of Millwood apart. Now, in the present day, a group of disparate teen girls — a brand-new set of Little Liars — find themselves tormented by an unknown assailant and made to pay for the secret sin their parents committed two decades ago … as well as their own. In the dark, coming-of-RAGE, horror-tinged drama Pretty Little Liars: Original Sin, we find ourselves miles away from Rosewood, but within the existing Pretty Little Liars universe — in a brand-new town, with a new generation of Little Liars.”

We Don’t Need a ‘Pretty Little Liars’ Reboot


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9 Biggest Moments from ‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’ Season 4

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Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Season 4 Review

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina wrapped up its run with the fourth and final season on Netflix.

Sabrina and friends faced their biggest threat to date – the eldrtich terrors. 

You can read recaps of each episode and a full season review right here!

Here are the biggest moments from the eight-episode season.

 

The Eldritch Terrors… obviously

The whole season revolved around the ancient entities that culminated with the arrival of the Void – the end of all things. Fitting for a final season, right? Sabrina, the coven, and her mortal friends teamed up to defeat each other terrors – The Dark, The Uninvited, The Weird, The Perverse, The Cosmic, The Returned, The Endless, and finally, The Void. 

 

Hilda and Mr. C Get Married

Nothing was going to stand in the way of Hilda and Mr. C’s big day, not even a terror threatening humankind. The odd couple agreed to have a wedding reception and ceremony as dictated by Zelda and the Academy, which ended up being kind of downer when The Uninvited crashed the party, killed Dorian, and then threatened everyone else because they refused to extend him an invite to the party. Sabrina served as mediator by swooping herself and The Uninvited to Hell for another wedding, where she then married him and trapped him in a prison existing outside of time and space on their wedding night. And she made it home just in time for the private ceremony at the Spellman house in which Hilda and Dr. C exchanged vows dressed up as their favorite movie monsters. 

 

Sabrina Gets Married to Caliban 

That other wedding I mentioned? It was Sabrina Morningstar’s! The 16-year-old wed Caliban, yeah, the same one that tried to kill her and Sabrina Spellman. She promised her was reformed and loved her and all that, but Caliban will always be Caliban… and he had his eye on that throne. Of course, this didn’t take away from Sabrina’s stunning red lace dress. Though, she did have to share the spotlight with Sabrina Spellman, who used the wedding as an opportunity to marry The Uninvited and trick him into captivity. All in a day’s work for these witches!

 

Roz is a Witch 

Roz always had powers, better known as “the cunning,” which essentially gave her psychic abilities, but this season, she learned that she’s a full-blown witch. Her ancestors, who were proud Christian women, didn’t want to be persecuted for witchcraft so they simply didn’t call themselves the W-word. However, once Mambo Marie proved that Roz had powers, she was welcomed into the Academy to join Mambo Marie and Prudence – and later Agatha – as the newest Weird Sister.

 

Sabrina Morningstar Perishes

With the realms in peril because of the existence of two Sabrinas, one of them had to go to the parallel realm to restore balance. Sabrina and Sabrina Morningstar played rock, paper, scissors to decide, and Morningstar lost. She walked through the mirror (wish it was a closet like on Sabrina the Teenage Witch, to be honest) in hopes of restoring balance in the cosmos and found herself in an eldritch terror known as the Endless. Basically, she was stuck in a diabolical sitcom and Salem is the eldritch terror. When the Void arrived, she managed to convince Salem that they had to escape and they ran back through the mirror. While she made it back to Sabrina’s realm, she died shortly after without telling Sabrina how to defeat it. 

 

Easter Eggs Galore 

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is known for throwing in little Easter eggs to sister show Riverdale, but they had a ton of fun with it in the final season. There were a few mentions of Riverdale High School and a cameo by Bret, Donna, and Joan, who played characters in a punk band. Riker Lynch, the brother of Ross Lynch (Harvey), also had a role as an undead leader of a rock band. 

And lastly, one episode replaced Sabrina’s Aunt Hilda and Zelda with Caroline Rhea and Beth Broderick, who played the original roles in the WB sitcom Sabrina the Teenage Witch

See all the Easter eggs here

 

Lilith Destroys Lucifer

Lilith has been wanting to reign in Hell for years. After killing her newborn son, Adam, to protect him from his father, Lucifer, she negotiated to get her powers back. She then turned on Lucifer and stabbed him with the sword she used to kill Lazarus, drank his blood, embraced his powers, and banished him to the Mortal Realm. Payback’s a b….

 

Agatha Returns to Normal

Crazy Agatha is crazy no more! After Dorcas returned to the land of the living due to an eldritch terror, she forgave her sister for murdering her. When that happened, Agatha snapped back to reality and clearly, had no recollection of what happened in the months prior. As Prudence said, it’s good to have her back, but she needs to be clued in on a lot. 

 

Sabrina and Nick Are Endgame… Literally

When Nick took responsibility for the demise of  his relationship with Sabrina on Chilling Adventures of Sabrina season 3, it was a big step. He promised to wait until she was ready because they were “endgame.” Sabrina likely didn’t think she would be ready as soon as she was, but when there’s a chance you might die, you kind of have to follow your heart. And her heart said that she loved Nick. From then on, they were inseparable as they fought side-by-side to defeat the eldritch terrors. 

When Sabrina embodied a piece of the Void and sacrificed herself to save everyone, it was heartbreaking to watch Nick mourn his girlfriend and the life they would have had together. But two people who are destined to be together will always find their way back to each other. As Sabrina chilled out in heaven, she was surprised to see Nick, who explained he went swimming and there was a “wicked undertow.”

The two kissed as he declared that they had forever and ever together. 


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