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Lucifer Season 5A Review – Let’s Get Celestial!

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Lucifer only gets better with each subsequent season.

Starting off as the little Devil that could, Lucifer began with a strict procedural setting, and while Lucifer sticks to the mold for the most part, with its growth and network change, it has more room to stretch the mold. Moving to Netflix was an obvious blessing for the series, allowing each episode to reach new heights as it can play with mature content with episode length that works for the series and not for ads and scheduling necessities.

Thank the Devil for the streaming model.

Sidebar: If you haven’t noticed, I’m going for Devil puns whenever I find the opportunity.

Following the trend of growth, Lucifer’s first half of season five is the most impressive run of episodes the fantasy procedural has aired yet. With intriguing enough ‘case of the episodes’ that directly push character growth and spiritual revelations, Lucifer does what many other shows that share an audience cannot do: it stays true to its characters and knows what its fans want.

Lucifer luckily was saved due to the passion of its fans and the potential the series showed from the beginning, and the creators don’t take that lightly. Lucifer hits the sweet spot of avoiding a premature cancellation and respecting its fans to the point where characterization and dynamic relationships remain at the forefront of the series and aren’t sacrificed due to plot or boredom.

Lucifer is what fantasy television should be. When watching this show, I, like many others probably wondered, asked, “How is this so good?” But the question remains: Is Lucifer great or is everything else kinda bad?

We hypothesize: a little bit of both.

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One of Lucifer’s mightiest strengths is its talented cast and the immaculate chemistry each cast member has with each other. The first part of season five is no exception.

While Tom Ellis always has an acting challenge in front of him with the complexities of playing the Devil, season five presents even more of a challenge as he plays both Lucifer and his brother, Michael, and Michale pretending to be Lucifer.

Tom Ellis rises to the challenge. He plays the two characters with ease, reminding the audience of his acting chops. Michael is significantly different from Lucifer, and that’s not taking the accent into account (which felt surprisingly wrong after watching Lucifer for four seasons).

Michael only plays his charade for a short amount of time, thanks to the knowledge of Lucifer’s friends and family around him. It doesn’t take Chloe long to figure out that Lucifer isn’t Lucifer, which is impressive. Many creative teams would have let the act play out for longer, opting for dramatics instead of consistent characterization, but Lucifer knows better than this. It puts character above all else, a nice change of pace for the genre, respecting not only the Lucifer, Chloe, and their relationship, but the relationship that fans have for these characters as well.

However, Chloe did not escape Michael’s initial manipulations unscathed. As a final curtain call, he informs her of the truth of her existence, which sends Chloe into a spiral, to say the least. It’s impossible to blame her, however, that’s a bomb if there ever was one.

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Thankfully, Lucifer’s return helps Chloe process this information and move forward. That’s not to say their eight-episode journey is a smooth sailing one — Chloe struggles with how to deal with Lucifer with this newfound information and Lucifer wants to make sure Chloe is okay before he returns to Hell.

Until Amenadiel returns from watching over Hell and informs Lucifer that Hell no longer needs a caretaker — which is highly suspicious, quite frankly.

However, some of Lucifer’s best character work is done through Lucifer and Chloe’s relationship, and the repercussions their newfound honesty and self-awareness have. Both characters have different insecurities that have rung through the course of the series, but never before have they bounced off in such a rapid-fire way as they do in the first half of season five.

After Chloe is able to accept her newly-realized role in the world, which is now celestial in a way even deeper than it was before, and is able to resume her relationship thanks to Amenadiel, it begins to affect Lucifer’s powers — namely his “mojo” and his vulnerability around Chloe, which sends both of them into bouts of analyzation.

This is a lot to begin with without adding Chloe’s very human insecurity about not hearing Lucifer tell her he loves her in exact words.

However, Lucifer handles their issues with both humor and grace, using very physical manifestations to represent the headspace each resides in as they tackle these newfound bumps in their relationship.

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Maze’s arc stands out as season five’s most emotional arc so far, as she embarks on a journey of facing the root of her abandonment issues. After being abandoned in one way or another by the major players in her life, Maze truly begins to feel alone, and the weight of existing soulless weighs heavily on her. She even perceives abandonment from Linda in a way, due to Charlie, but Linda acts as her rock this season and her shoulder to cry on.

Maze’s story is heartbreaking, from the moment when she showed up to find her mother has died, to the very end when she makes a desperate choice for an option that Lucifer never presented to her (probably because Michael is playing her and she can’t have a soul).

But Maze’s story and journey are the most soulful of them all.

Lesley Ann-Brandy is perhaps the MVP of season five so far, bringing life to Maze’s story while also excelling in the heavily genre-ed episode, “It Never Ends Well for the Chicken” where she plays the root of it all, Lilith.

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The rest of the cast play smaller roles in the first half of season five, but with eight episodes still to air, there’s no doubt that season five will give them all their due, as Lucifer is a show that knows how to give all of its players interesting arcs and respects its character and fans to provide proper closure, as this season was written as a final season before later finding out about its season six renewal.

Linda spends most of the season supporting Maze and being an obsessive new mon in between, but she is explored a bit further as she reveals her past with abandoning her baby which complicates things temporarily with Maze. This also indicates why Linda before has expressed her belief that she is going to Hell. And with God in the mix… she may very soon find an answer to this question.

Amenadiel also serves as a supporting player the first half of the season, but his best episode, “Detective Amenadiel” more than makes up for it with both an emotional and heartfelt story, with his interactions with the nuns also providing Chloe with more insight on her situation and on Lucifer himself.

Amenadiel’s biggest moment of the episodes aired doesn’t occur until the final moments of the show when his stress about his son allows him to stop times once again, leading to the revelation that his son is mortal. This, combined with the appearance of his Father are sure to launch Amenadiel into a larger role in the second half of season five, giving Amenadiel much more to come to terms with.

Dan, who seems to have a less important role most of the time, especially since his unawareness regarding celestial matters, finally gets his celestial cherry popped. His reaction is probably the most relatable one of all. Another victim of Michael, he attempts to kill Lucifer to protect Chloe and Trixie, which would be easy to sympathize with even if Michael had nothing to do with the train of events.

Kevin Alejandro, who also directs the final episodes of 5A, does a fantastic job showing the confusion, heartbreak, and fear that Dan experiences throughout the revelation and aftermath, leaving a usually lackluster character much more intriguing.

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Lucifer’s first half of season five is sold all around, but perhaps the weakest link of the run would be Ella’s plot with Pete aka The Whisper Killer. That’s not to say her arc is bad! It’s not. The struggle of being drawn to people who aren’t right for us is something that many people can understand. And Aimee Garcia plays Ella fantastically — from the crime scene to looking at herself shamefully in the mirror after hooking up with another no-good man.

And while her the heartbreak of finding out that the first good person she found was actually bad could lead to dramatic development moving forward, the plot still feels a bit far-fetched and contrived, even for a show about angels and demons.

Still, the reveal is well executed and besides the slight forcefulness of this arc choice, Ella is still such a loveable character, and with Lucifer centering itself in hope and change, Ella can be expected to overcome this hurdle in her personal life (and finally be inducted into the Celestial club).

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Lucifer’s first part of season five is an unarguable success. Even beyond characters, dynamics, and lore, Lucifer succeeds in the procedural aspect as well, providing intriguing mystery-of-the-weeks at a mock Mars base, a convent, a writers’ room, and not to mention its flashback noir episode.

Lucifer is unique because in a climate with differentiating opinions on what shows should provide and how much weight creators should give their fans, Lucifer transcends all of this. It provides interesting and fangirl-worthy relationships, dynamic character development, interesting supernatural lore, and fun episodic mysteries which are interestingly symbolic to the characters’ personal struggles.

And with a cliffhanger culminating with an angelic fight and an appearance from Dennis Haysbert’s God, there’s hardly any qualms to be had with Lucifer’s new installment.


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Amanda Reimer is a fresh Angeleno, growing up in Texas and currently residing in LA. Assistant by day, stage manager by night, she writes in between. You can catch her watching sci-fis, procedurals, or perhaps, entrenching in a science documentary. She is also a cat mom to her calico, Kiki.

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8 Biggest & Most Shocking Moments from Season 2 of ‘Outer Banks’

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8 Biggest & Most Shocking Moments from Season 2 of 'Outer Banks'

Outer Banks Season 2 is all about searching for the gold (just like all those Olympic athletes in Tokyo) and embarking on a new and deadly treasure hunt.

The season is packed with action right out of the gate as it picks up with John B and Sarah’s adventure in the Bahamas. 

Throughout the season, it becomes clear that the Pogues can never catch a break. And though they don’t come out on top in the end, they never lose their sense of self or their purpose. 

They are Pogues through and through — the Pogue life might not be easy, but it is eventful. 

There are lots of jaw-dropping moments that it’s hard to narrow down to just a topline few, but we’ll do our best.

 

Sarah and John B Get Married

Their relationship was a little touch and go for a bit after they got home from the Bahamas, but as Sarah learned the ugly truth about her family and her father, she grew closer and closer to John B. It’s a little out of the ordinary for 16-year-old’s to get married (and yes, it’s sometimes easy to forget that they are only 16!), but it was more of a “promise ring” situation than an actual marriage. However, the feelings they have for each other are real and strong. They’ve been through hell and back together, and they understand each other in a way that others don’t. Sarah is officially a “P4L.”

8 Biggest & Most Shocking Moments from Season 2 of 'Outer Banks'

OUTER BANKS (L to R) RUDY PANKOW as JJ, CHASE STOKES as JOHN B, MADELYN CLINE as SARAH CAMERON, and MADISON BAILEY as KIARA in episode 208 of OUTER BANKS Cr. JACKSON LEE DAVIS/NETFLIX © 2021

Rafe Tries to Kill Sarah

Rafe was not in the right headspace throughout the season, which he himself admitted. Mental health is important, but it was completely brushed off by his father who constantly told him to “man up.” As a result, Rafe had trouble navigating his thoughts and turned into a monster that was all too comfortable with killing and was ready to do absolutely anything to protect his family. When it became obvious that Sarah was going to become an issue since she planned to testify that he murdered Sheriff Peterkin, Rafe tried to reason with her. When that failed, he dunked her head underwater and attempted to drown her. If it wasn’t for Topper, who just happened to be around (why was he around?), Sarah might not be alive today. 

 

Injuries Galore

Since the action didn’t stop for a minute, there were a lot of injuries amongst the Pogues. Sarah was shot by Rafe while trying to steal the gold in Nassau, Kiara almost drowned while scouring the sewers for the gun that killed Sheriff Peterkin (also because of Rafe), John B almost became an alligator’s snack (one of the more random moments of the season), Pope was stung by a handful of wasps while trying to find the Cross of Santo Domingo (poor guy swoll up like a balloon), and JJ almost drowned after being knocked out by the blunt end of a machete and going overboard (he survived thanks to Kiara who kept him afloat until the Pogues could pull him to safety!). It’s safe to say, it was an intense and dangerous season for everyone involved in this elaborate and high-stakes treasure hunt.

8 Biggest & Most Shocking Moments from Season 2 of 'Outer Banks'

OUTER BANKS (L to R) RUDY PANKOW as JJ, JONATHAN DAVISS as POPE, and MADISON BAILEY as KIARA in episode 204 of OUTER BANKS Cr. JACKSON LEE DAVIS/NETFLIX © 2021

John B Is Arrested for Murder

And he was facing the death penalty. It’s not surprising for someone accused of murdering a Sheriff in cold blood, but it was surprising considering we know that John B is innocent and being framed. The Pogues made several attempts to clear his name, and though it seemed like Shoupe was turning a blind eye to the truth because he was on Ward’s payroll, he eventually pieced it all together secretly and the charges against John B were dropped. Of course, it was almost a little too late as Ward put a hit out on John B in prison that almost killed him. 

 

Ward Kills Himself… Well, Almost

There’s a Polish idiom that basically translates to “no disaster can befall an evil person,” and that couldn’t be truer for Ward. No one is able to bring him down no matter how hard they try because he’s always one step ahead of everyone. He manipulates people and pays them off, which allows him to get away with everything.

When it seemed like the walls were caving in on him and justice would finally be served, he killed himself on his boat. My mother (who did not watch season 1 and got sucked into season 2 by accident) immediately stated that he faked his death and likely snorkeled out through the bottom. Surprisingly, she was 100% correct. Of course, Ward planned his escape in a way that would clear Rafe of all charges and allow his family to escape without being held accountable for anything. Ward never showed any remorse for all the murders he committed; he only ever thought about himself and what he wanted. 

John B almost had him again on the ship headed to Guadalupe. After he saw Ward choking Sarah out (he realized she was a Pogue and not a Kook, which meant she posed a threat to the family and had to be “taken care of”), John B knocked him out and was so close to throwing him overboard. However, John B couldn’t bring himself to do it. While it would’ve been the perfect revenge for his father as Ward killed him and threw him overboard, it’s a good thing he didn’t cross that line because he would’ve never been able to come back from it. John B is not a killer. 

While most people would naturally die from such injuries, Ward held on and was recovering in the infirmary on the ship. 

8 Biggest & Most Shocking Moments from Season 2 of 'Outer Banks'

OUTER BANKS (L to R) DREW STARKEY as RAFE and CHARLES ESTEN as WARD CAMERON in episode 206 of OUTER BANKS Cr. JACKSON LEE DAVIS/NETFLIX © 2021

The Key, Denmark Tanny, and the Cross of Monte Cristo

There was a lot happening with this B-plot, which later took over as the main storyline after Ward stole back the gold in the Bahamas. A woman named Carla Limbrey reached out to Pope looking for a key that led to the Cross of Santo Domingo. Pope wasn’t sure what she was talking about initially, but once he found the key in his MeeMaw’s old apartment, he did some digging and found out he was the descendant of Denmark Tanny, a slave who was involved with the sinking of the Royal Merchant. He was the one who hid the gold and the cross, which now belonged to Pope. The cross allegedly held a healing shroud inside, which is why Carla wanted it. However, when she got her hands on it, she was disappointed to learn that the shroud was not inside. 

Upon learning how valuable it was, Rafe and Reid, Carla’s step-brother, stole the cross from Pope and the Pogues. Pope was so fed up with having everything taken from him that he fought back. The cross ended up on the ship, and the Pogues snuck on by hiding in a shipping container. They were so close to stealing the cross back (which honestly, was probably too heavy for them to steal to begin with), but when the plan went sideways, Pope decided that he’d rather dump it in the ocean than let Rafe and the Cameron’s have it. Unfortunately, Rafe and the men on board were able to pull the cross back onto the ship as the Pogues sped off in a lifeboat.

 

Poguelandia

The Pogues docked on an uninhabited island somewhere in the Caribbean where I imagine they will likely recoup and re-strategize. My guess is that when Netflix renews the show for a third season, the fight for the treasure will continue. Pope declared that “it wasn’t over,” and with their motto being “nothing to lose,” I can’t imagine they’ll let this go so easily. The Cameron’s have taken way too much from them already. 

 

John B’s Father Is Alive

In one last shocking twist, Carla Limbrey arrived in Barbados on official Royal Merchant business and confronted John B’s father… who is very much alive. It seems as though he allowed everyone to believe he was dead and hid out on an island plotting his revenge. Like father, like son, right?

The two of them talk about the Cross of Santo Domingo and the cloth with healing powers…. but why? Why is he in cahoots with Carla, a woman who was so willing to screw over his son? Why does he want the cloth?

 

What did you think of the season? What was the most shocking moment in your opinion?


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Will ‘Manifest’ Get a Season 4 After All?

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Manifest Season Finale Review Mayday Part 1 and 2 Season 3 Episode 12 and 13

Merely weeks after the devastating cancellation of NBC’s ManifestTVLine confirms that the network has been in talks with Warner Bros. and Netflix about a possible Season 4. However, reps for NBC, Netflix, and Warner Bros. have refused to comment for now.

Following the news of the supernatural drama’s abrupt ending in mid-June, fans took to social media with the hashtag #SaveManifest in hopes of reversing the decision and getting it picked up by another network.

MANIFEST — Pictured: “Manifest” Key Art — (Photo by: NBC)

After the release of the first two seasons on streaming services, the series quickly dominated the charts. It remained on Netflix’s “Top 10” watched shows for 27 consecutive days and Nielsen’s weekly streaming chart during the week of June 14.

Jeff Rake, Manifest’s showrunner, tweeted in late June, “Your support is awe-inspiring…we’re not giving up. You deserve an end to the story.”

While Rake has not confirmed that another season is officially happening, he did note: “Lots of speculation out there. No comment. Other than, if the impossible happens and the dead rise again, it’s because of YOU.”

Whatever it takes, Rake will even choose to produce a two-hour movie to bring closure to Manifest.

So Manifesters, you’ve been heard, and you can only get louder from here! Will the answers you’ve been waiting for resurface in a possible Season 4 pick-up? Will 828 fly again? 

Manifest: 11 Questions We Need Answered


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‘Feel Good’ Season 2 Packs Quite the Punch

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In Season 2, the final adaptation of comedian Mae Martin’s (they/them) semi-autobiographical comedy, Feel Good takes on much more content in its short six episodes, packing quite the punch.

We’re guided deeper through the traumas of the primary character Mae and left wondering how they’re able to stand on their own two feet after years of childhood grooming, drug addiction, and parental toxicity.

The light answer to this is humor. As it’s joked often throughout the episodes, “comics are supposed to be sacks of shit.” Through light-hearted comedy and the power of laughter, Mae’s story is dissected. However, at times, big topics are rushed and viewers are left grasping at strings, wishing there were more episodes in the season.

Mae on Feel Good Season 2

Mae on the phone in rehab on Feel Good Season 2. Credit: Netflix

Following an unfortunate relapse in Season 1, we’re immediately thrown into Mae’s life in Canada, as they’re about to reenter rehab. They’ve only been away from England for a couple of months, but with the fresh wounds of the breakup, both George (Charlotte Ritchie) and Mae aren’t healed and are still stuck in their desire for each other. I mean, Mae still has George’s photo on their nightstand!

While in rehab, Mae reconnects with an old “friend,” Scott. When he’s first introduced we’re left wondering who he is and what his role is in Mae’s life. As an addict and queer comedian, there’s much more behind Mae’s curtain of trauma than initially presented in Season 1. Much more trauma that’s led to rash behavior, and Mae’s conversation with Audrey, easily foreshadows this.

Intertwined with the main storyline, Mae’s also navigating their non-binary identity. Mirroring Martin’s own coming-out as non-binary, Mae’s figuring it out, explaining that they see themselves as more of a Ryan Goslin or Adam Driver.

Again, with only six episodes to squeeze so much storyline into, Mae’s rehab stint only lasts 15 minutes into the first episode before they’re running out the door back into the arms of Scott.

As Mae’s stumbling through life in Canada, George is also trying to keep her mind focused on things like saving the bees. At an event at her school, she meets Elliot, a bisexual, polyamorous man with whom she bonds. He’s the nice guy, maybe too nice for George. He’s one of those men who are self-proclaimed progressive and ultra-feminist, trying to mansplain the harm in porn’s presentation of women and how sex needs to be a safe space for connection.

George, Elliot, Jack, and Mae on Feel Good Season 2.

George, Elliot, Jack, and Mae on a double date on Feel Good Season 2. Credit: Netflix

And as Mae knows, that’s definitely not how George likes to be treated during sex. Thankfully, George and Mae reconnect, and Elliot is quickly out of the picture with Mae and George recreating their first meet-cute, hoping to restart from a fully healed wound.

As Feel Good is written by a queer person, the portrayal of queer sex is finally construed in a realistic and non-hypersexualized manner. Mae and George run through various role-playing scenarios as they are falling into what seems to be a healthy relationship.

Realistically, their timeline is rushed, but Mae needed some stability before they faced the bigger demons hiding under the bed.

The show cleverly depicts Mae’s moments of withdrawal and trauma responses through a high-pitched ringing sound. As if we’re inside Mae’s head. Originally, Mae experienced the ringing sound when they were with George, as George was a replacement drug. But, in this season, the ringing sound appeared whenever the past tried to resurface.

Mae and George in bed on Feel Good Season 2

Mae and George on Feel Good Season 2. Credit: Netflix

Mae told Audrey that they had a hard time remembering the past, that it was all like a jumbly tumbly mess of Tupperware containers. But, as the episodes progress, each Tupperware slowly found its way to its matching lid.

It becomes clear that Scott isn’t just an old friend, but a man who used to abuse and take advantage of Mae. After Mae’s kicked out of the house at a young age for drug addiction, they move in with Scott who presents himself as a safe haven and gateway to Mae’s comedic success. When, in reality, he’s a pedophile who’s grooming them.

When a woman calls Mae to talk about Scott, presumably about the things he did to both of them in the past, Mae’s reminded of the trauma they had compartmentalized. A doctor suggests Mae might have PTSD, and with George’s help, they begin the journey of confronting the harmful past.

Meanwhile, through all of the personal traumas, Mae’s working through their professional success after being signed with an agent and fulfilling their dream of TV comedy. However, Mae finds it challenging to reinvent their success from the original standup virality that got them the agent in the first place. As mentioned earlier, with comics, the butt of their jokes is their own trauma.

Feel Good Season 2

Mae bringing George flowers on Feel Good Season 2. Credit: Netflix

Unfortunately, as Mae hasn’t healed from their trauma, there’s no way they can make light of it yet. As their career goes for a bit of a downhill turn, and they have a hard time performing for an audience, they begin to seclude themselves and withdraw from the world.

In a much-needed getaway, Mae, George, and Phil take a trip to Canada in order for Mae to confront Scott.

The scene in which Mae directly tells Scott they never want to speak to them again, although a bit anticlimactic, was retrospectively a strong scene that finalized Mae’s character arc in the perfect ending to a witty, raw, and endearing show.

The final episode leaves Mae leaps and bounds beyond where they had been before on their road to recovery. And just as Mae’s love for George grew healthily from a need to a want, our need for a Season 3 resolved itself, and we feel good saying our final goodbyes to Mae and George, knowing fully well they are on their way to a fresh start.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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