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The Bold Type

The Bold Type – Betsy (2×07)

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The Bold Type had “the talk” this week — the gun talk.

And while uncomfortable, it was necessary as part of a larger debate that many folks are having with their own close friends and family at this very moment.

Basically, Jane was disgusted when she found out Sutton owned a shotgun and better yet, that she kept it inside their NYC apartment.

“Do you have a MAGA hat,” she asked her sarcastically which was an unnecessary jab coming from someone who maybe isn’t as informed about guns as she should be. It’s easy to be scared of something when you don’t understand it or are always being told that it does more harm than good.

Sutton on the other hand was unapologetically proud of her shotgun who she named Betsy back in high school. She had a pretty decent argument for holding onto Betsy — she liked to shoot skeet.

On her first day back, Jane was thrust into the position of “proving” that she was worthy of getting her job back. And without batting an eyelash, she pitched the article title: “I love my best friend but hate her gun.”

The Bold Type always tries to find ways to incorporate hot button topics into their series by way of article. Was it a neat and tidy story that could be wrapped up in one episode? Definitely not. Could they have had this debate for episodes on end? Of course. But that would be counterproductive.

Both ladies made very valid arguments for opposing and supporting guns. I wasn’t satisfied with Sutton giving up her gun at the end, however, because it seemed like she enjoyed it for more reasons than just for control. Jane wanted to the outcome to be Sutton giving up the gun and when recounting all the massive school shootings didn’t work, she appealed to Sutton’s emotional side by telling her she only used the gun as a crutch to be controlling.

Jane is the last person that should be talking about control when the whole point of her article was to gain control of the situation and Sutton.

Sutton caved to Jane and the beliefs that owning a gun somehow made her a terrible person when in reality, there are various types of gun owners — good and bad. It wasn’t very authentic for a character who is the most put together and responsible on the show.

Sutton feeling control of her gun, in my opinion, was a good thing because it meant she knew what she was doing and following all the rules. Not once did anything ever get out of hand nor did it pose a threat to Jane.

I will also agree with the statement that guns don’t kill people, people kill people. Sure, it’s much easier with a gun, however, the gun laying in the apartment itself would not do anything. Jane made it seem like just by laying in a secure case, it would somehow affect her life and she’d move out if Sutton didn’t get rid of it. Girl, take a few breaths.

That illogical fear is formed from not being knowledgable about it.

Maybe part two of this convo should focus on mental health in America and guns getting into the hands of those who aren’t as careful around them as Sutton is.

I also like how they addressed stereotyping a gun owner. Sutton isn’t what you’d imagine a shotgun owner to look like, but she is one and there are plenty more folks that look just like her.

Jane’s been on a rather judgmental streak as of late, first with Kat on the topic of diversity in the workplace and now with Sutton when it comes to guns. Just because she has an opinion doesn’t make her right or better than anyone. It’s kind of getting annoying and it’s making her rather unlikeable.

At this point, even Ryan told her to maybe consider Sutton’s point of view.

And why is she reaching out to her ex hook-up instead of her boyfriend? Jane’s life has been so messy as of late, she really cannot speak about anyones decisions or try to use their situations as leverage to gain control. The promo teasing her possible pregnancy is just more proof that she really has no idea what she’s doing right now or who she even is.

By approaching Jaclyn and asking for her old desk back, she wanted to be in control again.

As for Adena and Kat, their open relationship of sorts could be problematic, or it could be what brings them towards closer to being endgame and allows them to build a strong foundation of trust.

I’ve read some comments about how the way their relationship is being handle feeds into a bi-sexual trope that LGBTQ characters aren’t faithful or need to experiment, and I don’t necessarily see it that way.

My thoughts may be invalidated because I am not part of that community nor do I know as much about their representation as I should, but I’m coming at it from the these are two people in a relationship who are facing a problem and dealing with it heads on.

The problem of experimenting and being curious isn’t necessarily exclusive to LGBTQ couples — this is a problem any couple could face.

I personally didn’t see Kat hooking up with another woman as cheating because she received permission from Adena to do it.

I also don’t think it’s one of those “hit a specific number and you’re gay enough to be with me” situations because she’s not necessarily trying to prove to herself that she likes women. She knows she does. And while she may be unsure if she’s gay or bi, the whole point isn’t to convince herself of her sexuality, it’s to embrace it.

Adena has been there and done that multiple times with multiple women. Kat is a newbie and like any newbie, she’s curious. Most of us were in our first relationship and sexual experience.

While some may be content with one woman for the rest of their lives, Kat isn’t one of those people. And Adena knows that.

She also knows that if she doesn’t allow her to explore, she’ll grow to resent her or worse, she will end up cheating out of lust and it will ruin this good thing that they have.

It’s kind of the like when you tell someone they can’t have something, it makes them want it even more.

Kat thought it was wrong, so she felt guilty and couldn’t stop the thoughts and sex dreams.

I think it’s all very human.

I don’t necessarily think that an open relationship would work for everyone and who knows, it might be a flop for them as well.

But if they are both in agreement about what is happening here, I don’t see an issue.

Other Thoughts

  • Olivier is human and his relationship with the three ladies is quite enjoyable.
  • Sutton’s encounter with “Brookie” was the worst thing ever. She was such a bitch to Sutton the whole time they were friends and then treated her like Sutton did her dirty. Girl, bye.
  • Can someone please bring Alex back? I miss him. The office needs more masculinity.
  • Also, Richard. Where is he? Where is his new girlfriend? When will get back with Sutton? While I love her independent street as the woman who can’t be tamed, I don’t want to see their relationship wither away for good.
  • Knowing Sutton’s background as a rural girl in a shooting club makes me like her that much more. It shows that you can’t let where you come from stop you from pursuing your dreams!


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

The Bold Type

The Bold Type Review – [Spoiler] Breaks Up (4×15)

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The Bold Type Love Review

The ladies of The Bold Type found themselves navigating the various exciting and/or complicated stages of love that propelled their relationships in new directions — some for the better and some for the worst. 

The episode strayed from the usual format focusing individually on Jane, Kat, Jacqueline, and Sutton’s relationships, which was necessary for the big reveal towards the end as it provided a resolution to the Sutton and Richard baby drama. 

Richard and Sutton fell under the “unconditional love” because that unconditional love has carried them through some really tough times and got to where they are today. 

But unfortunately, it wasn’t enough. 

If you’ve been paying attention to their romance of the years, the outcome wasn’t entirely shocking, but it was heartbreaking nonetheless and will allow Meaghann Fahy to explore the most vulnerable and emotional parts of her character. She’s been doing such a great job with bringing the feels and delivering those gut-punching scenes that I have no doubt she’ll follow through in whatever the writers throw her way.

Though, admittedly, I’m not a fan of the dissolution of Richard and Sutton. It makes sense following their self-discovery, but it’s not a storyline I wanted to pursue as a fan of the couple who has overcome all odds. 

I was hoping we’d get to see them navigate the age difference with Sutton learning to prioritize her career and her marriage while her friends were still in the “discovery” phase. Finding your heart’s desire is a blessing but it can also be a curse when it happens so young and you don’t have anyone your age that you can relate to. Sutton was setting a great example. 

It would have also allowed Sutton’s character not to repeat her mother’s mistakes by being a good and loving mom to her future children. Through her relationship with Carly, we know Sutton has what it takes to be a great mother.

However, once the writers made the choice that Sutton knew she didn’t want kids, they had to go with it without hesitation. 

Richard and Sutton moved mountains to be together, but sadly, disagreeing on wanting children is not something they could get over, push aside, or ignore. As much as it pains me to see them go their separate ways, there wasn’t any other way this could have resolved itself that wouldn’t end up in some form of resentment from both parties. 

While you usually want to talk about children prior to the wedding, it wasn’t either of their faults because they weren’t being honest with themselves or each other. They wanted things to work so badly, but it’s like putting a square puzzle piece into a circle. No matter how hard you try, it doesn’t fit. 

They love each other so much that Richard knew letting Sutton go was the right thing in the long run no matter how much it hurts now. 

However, this also brought up some interesting points about how Richard was always bending to please Sutton. Will she still like her life now when he’s not in it?

While Sutton has made some sacrifices for Richard, I’ll agree that for the most part, he’s been the one giving things up to make her happy. And I’m glad that it didn’t happen this time. Richard drew the line because he wanted a family more. 

In a way, it almost seemed like Sutton thought he would once again concede and put her desires first — she seemed sure of it, and when that wasn’t the case, the gravity and reality of the situation caved in on her. 

The Bold Type would’ve been sending the wrong message had one of them compromised on such a major decision. And hopefully, they don’t bring them together again with one of them changing their minds because that’s unrealistic. They were both confident in their choices and again, while I wasn’t pleased with where the narrative was heading, I respected that they stood firm in their wants and beliefs. Sutton and Richard are both headstrong, independent who never waver in what they want. The only way this storyline holds its power is if they stay broken up. 

Kat and Jane both fell under the umbrella of “forbidden love” because their romantic interests aren’t exactly 100% kosher in the workplace or in society. 

Last week’s episode of The Bold Type revealed Kat had the hots for Ava, the super conservative daughter of the former Scarlet head honcho, RJ Safford, that cost Kat her job after she exposed him.

I’ll be blunt that I’m not into this relationship at all. I don’t think Ava has good intentions, and I don’t think Kat, who risked her career to out his stance on conversion therapy, would willingly fall into his daughter’s arms. It doesn’t stay true to her character — a character who doesn’t conform to be comfortable, who stands up for her beliefs, and who aims to use her voice for better.

There’s finding common ground with Ava, and then there’s bypassing everything you stand for because you’ve got the hots for her. 

But for Kat’s sake, Ava was also feeling the vibes. 

After the successful launch of Kat’s podcast, the ladies let go of all that pent up chemistry and well, you know things are going to get complicated. The relationship doesn’t make much sense as the ladies butt heads on nearly every point, but since when does love follow any sort of logic? 

Jane’s relationship with Scott didn’t progress nearly as quickly as Kat’s with Ava, but after following a story together centered around a sexist workplace that fired and refused to hire attractive women out of a fear that they would be a liability for men who cannot control themselves amid the “Me Too” movement, Scott took the opportunity to shoot his shot. It was an odd moment to lay out his feelings, for sure, but he had a fair point about the difficulties of working with someone you’re attracted to. 

We know Jane felt the same way despite it making things complicated because she’s his boss. I’ll be the one to point out that workplaces romances very rarely end well and things are bound to get awkward, but at least Scott proved to be respectful because he made it clear he wouldn’t pursue Jane if she wasn’t into it. He obviously differs a great deal from the men in their expose. 

Jane didn’t need to leave him hangings as she clearly reciprocates his feelings, but she was also surprised by his boldness and transparency. The moment caught her off guard, and she was saved by the bell thanks to an emergency call from Sutton. 

At the end of the day, relationships come and go, but friendship is forever. The Bold Type has made that their mission statement and this drove that point home tenfold. Friendship trumps everything including relationships that are in the heat of the moment. 

Sutton sent up the bat signal and her girls answered! And it’s a good thing because there’s never been a moment that Sutton needed the ladies more. 

The episode would have done well by just focusing on the three ladies, but in excelled by incorporating Jacqueline’s romance. She’s been going to therapy with Ian to get their marriage back on track, so they fittingly fell under the umbrella of “rekindled love.”

The first step is wanting to make things better in a relationship, the second step is to actively make those changes. Ian and Jacqueline attempted by playing tennis together, but Ian eventually snapped and called her out for undermining him and always needing to be right. 

Jacqueline’s pride got in the way, again, and she rejected the notion that her behavior was dismissive, but after chatting with Richard about his drama with Sutton, she realized she was always shutting down anything Ian said because she was afraid of being vulnerable and hurt again. 

If there’s anything to take away from Sutton and Richard’s relationship its the importance of listening to your significant other and taking their thoughts and ideas into consideration. 

The fifth love story focused on Alex and Alicia in the “complicated love” phase. He wanted to respect her boundaries and the fact that she was an independent woman, so he didn’t intervene when some guy was hitting on her at the bar, but he realized, she needed it.

Love can be complicated at times, but you always have to follow your gut. It was a minor love story, and I have to say, it wasn’t Alex that shined in the scene, it was Andrew in drag!

The Bold Type explored love in all its different stages before honing in on the very idea that friendship is forever and the only constant. 

What did you think of the episode? Are you happy or sad about Richard and Sutton? 

Do you like Ava and Kat’s relationship? And do you think Jane should pursue something serious with Scott or is she crossing a line?


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The Bold Type

The Bold Type Review – Sutton and Richard Disagree on the Future, Kat Learns Ava’s Secret (4×14)

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The Bold Type The Truth Will Set You Free Review

Embracing your truth —  no matter how difficult —  is important.

The ladies of The Bold Type made some necessary discoveries about themselves on “The Truth Will Set You Free,” some for the better, others for the worst, but none of them all that surprising. 

There was nothing shocking about Kat’s attraction towards foe-turned-friend-and-possibly-more, Ava. They didn’t get off on the right foot, but there was palpable chemistry between the two of them through every brief interaction leading up to Ava’s reveal that she’s a lesbian. Simply putting that out there made Kat more aware of her attraction to Ava, and in a weird way, as she was pursuing her for the podcast, she was also pursuing her romantically. 

Kat’s realization was ill-timed as she uttered Ava’s name during a romantic moment with her current partner, but at least she admitted what she was subconsciously feeling. The truth shall set you free. 

While I’m not a huge fan of Ava, I do like that she challenges Kat to see the other side of things. Kat is an outspoken liberal who sees things through her own perspective and lens, but Ava is the opposite of everything Kat believes a Republican is. And while they may disagree on many issues, it opens up an honest, purposeful conversation that is much-needed in our current political climate. 

Are Sutton and Richard over? They are the couple I truly believe in wholeheartedly, but this is one situation where suggesting a compromise is unfair to both parties. The miscarriage made Richard want children even more, while Sutton realized she doesn’t want them at all. There is no middle ground, no gray area, it’s black and white. Richard shouldn’t have to give up his wants and desires and neither should Sutton. 

So many things have been pulling Richard and Sutton in different directions — their age, society, and their career goals — but they managed to make it through because of their love for one another. But if they love each other, they know that the only thing to do is to go their separate ways if neither person is willing to give up something so important to them. 

The Bold Type The Truth Will Set You Free Review

THE BOLD TYPE – “The Truth Will Set You Free” – Jane isn’t comfortable in her post-surgery body, but a visit from her dad may change her outlook. Sutton and Richard make plans for the future. Kat tries to move forward at work with a podcast, but her first episode comes with a price. This episode of “The Bold Type” airs Thursday, July 2, at 10:00p.m. ET/PT on Freeform. (Freeform/Jonathan Wenk)
AISHA DEE

And while I don’t want them to break-up, I kind of love that Sutton didn’t agree to a middle ground and followed her heart and her gut. So often in society, women are told that they should want kids and they should be happy when it happens. Some women just know they want them, and that’s great, more power to you. Others know they want them in the future but they aren’t ready right now, and that’s okay too. But Sutton knew she wasn’t going to change her mind. This wasn’t a phase, and it wasn’t something that would change five-years down the line, and that’s just as valid as the woman who instinctively knows she was meant to be a mom. 

The Bold Type always pushes the envelope and embraces the hard conversations because it’s important to give everyone a voice. Sutton didn’t waver even though she knew it could cost her everything that she loved about her current life. 

Hopefully, Richard and Sutton will be as brave as she was when it comes to deciding what their next steps should be. 

Jane continued to struggle with her post-mastectomy body. I don’t necessarily agree with her assessment that she was “feeling sorry for herself” because again, she was struggling with her identity; she wasn’t feeling like herself and she didn’t know how to get out of her funk, for lack of a better term. However, she didn’t just sit around and mope either. She was proactive about overcoming the resentment and anxiety by going on a date with her boobs, taking them on a night on the town, and sure, those things didn’t work, but it proves Jane’s resilience. She isn’t the kind of person that’s going to give up and wallow around in self-pity. 

Turns out, all she needed to do was a good old-fashioned chat with her dad. Nothing worked because Jane needed to change her perspective. She wasn’t looking at the procedure as a blessing but rather a curse. When her father came to town, he reminded her that because she made this brave choice and put herself first, she had time to find herself. 

She made a decision that saved her life — the same privileges were not given to her late mother. 

While its understandable Jane will continue to struggle a bit, it’s important that she realizes just how lucky she is and learns that she deserves to embrace and enjoy her life. And most importantly, that she doesn’t waste this second chance. 

Regardless of what we’re going through in life, I think that’s an important reminder we could all use on some level. 

The ladies owned their truth and relied on each other when times got tough, so even though it was predictable for Kat to fall for Ava, Sutton to realize she doesn’t want children, and Jane to finally accept her new boobs, seeing them work through it and bravely choices that reflected their truth was a joy. 

This is one TV friendship I don’t take for granted. 

What did you think of the episode? Share your thoughts in the comments below! 


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The Bold Type

The Bold Type Review – Grief Comes in Waves as Sutton Deals with a Miscarriage (4×13)

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The Bold Type Lost Review

It’s okay to ask for help. In fact, it’s encouraged. 

On The Bold Type Season 4 Episode 13, Sutton, Kat, Jane, and even Jacqueline sought out the help of others as they dealt with varying stages of grief.

Jane was grieving the loss of her identity following her double mastectomy, Kat was grieving her past and memories as she fought to carve out her new path, Jacqueline was grieving the loss of a relationship that made her feel alive, but the gut-punch came with Sutton’s grief over her unexpected miscarriage.

Meghann Fahy’s layered performance during this episode gave me chills. She flawlessly captured the emotions of numbness, loss, and shame in such a nuanced way that resonates with many women. We’re used to seeing Sutton as the happy, bright, and go-lucky character, but this was an emotional pull that allowed her to dig much deeper. 

Miscarriage happens to so many women and yet, it’s a topic that isn’t widely talked about on television. Thankfully, The Bold Type isn’t the kind of show that’s afraid to go there, and I mean really go there, with taboo topics. 

The miscarriage, much like the pregnancy, came as a shock to Sutton and Richard. The rug was pulled right from under them as the future that seemed so promising prior to their first ultrasound appointment had vanished. 

Sutton didn’t know how to feel, but every little emotion she felt was valid. 

She tried to distract herself with work in order to help make sense of what she was feeling, or rather, what she wasn’t feeling.

Eventually, she realized that the numbness was masking a sense of relief, a feeling she was ashamed and disgusted by because babies are a blessing and something we should want. 

It’s okay to want a baby one day but also be relieved that the one day isn’t now, which seems to be what Sutton realized when working with her kindergartener client. 

And that’s something the series will dig into deeper because Richard’s upset and hurt reaction to the miscarriage reveals he was ready for a baby now. 

Will this destroy what Sutton and Richard worked so hard to build?

Prior to the wedding, the couple never talked about having kids because it seemed like it was so far away and now, there’s a chance it threatens that marriage because they’re on two different pages. 

Richard is older than Sutton, which isn’t talked about often, but this will bubble that up to the top and force us to acknowledge the age-difference and that what they want is vastly different. Can live make it work? Can they compromise?

The reality is that Sutton is only 26. She has the career she’s dreamt about her whole life and a bright future ahead of her. It’s not exactly surprising that she isn’t in the headspace to give all of that up, even temporarily, to raise a child. 

Jane’s struggles continued when she didn’t feel like herself. Kat’s suggestion to get back into the dating scene via a dating app may have been propelled by good intentions, but Jane’s problems aren’t going to be solved by hopping on the train to “bone town.”

Jane suppressed many feelings from her breakup with Ryan, but it was a minor issue in terms of learning to love herself again and be comfortable in her own skin.

In a surprising twist, Jane got some sound advice from Scotty, which was interesting because though he cannot understand what she’s going through, he does know what helped him with his own grief of losing a parent. 

The idea of reaching out to people who have gone through something similar and finding a support group resonated with Jane. As Grey’s Anatomy fans would put it, Jane found her “people.”

There’s a romance bubbling between Jane and Scotty that I can’t say I’m too excited about. Their platonic relationship seems to be what Jane needs now, plus, if she becomes involved now while she’s finding herself, she’ll once again become as co-dependent as she was with Ryan. 

We don’t need that. Jane just learned she can stand on her own two feet, there’s no reason for her to fall back into old habits.

However, since we know the show is going to go there no matter how much the fans object, let’s just hope that whatever happens between Jane and Scotty will be rooted in friendship first and foremost.

Kat struggled with letting go of the past to make room for her future, but in her case, holding onto the past was like trying to hold grains of sand in your hand — you can try to stop it, but they’ll slip away regardless. 

It was understandable that Kat wanted to hold on to pieces of her life because that’s all she had left. Everything else was gone and falling apart. Doing the right thing cost Kat a lot of her personal life. 

But if there’s anyone who can do it, it’s Kat, the chameleon of the group. She’s endured the most character growth as she’s constantly changing, evolving, and bettering herself. 

When she says that “so much has changed” since she ran for City Council, she truly means it. 

Kat’s not the type of person whose identity and existence could be amounted by personal and material belongings, and once she learned that, she was free to be the person that this next chapter of her life needed. 

The podcast seems like something right up her alley — it’s a logical next step that capitalizes on her the expertise she perfected at Scarlet while merging her passion for social justice issues and evoking change. 

And if that means we get more scenes between her and Alex, I’m here for it. Their friendship is so adorable, and the joy that spread across his face when she gifted him Pokemon stickers was incredibly sweet and heartwarming. 

I can’t say I’m too excited about Kat’s path crossing with Ava Rhodes again. Even from that quick snippet, there’s some chemistry that I don’t think the series should explore. It feels too weird, especially because this is the woman that cost Kat everything and forced her to reinvent herself. 

Even Jacqueline dealt with “what could have been” when Ian brought up Miles Shaw. While it was surely awkward for her husband to bring up her recent lover, it needed to be acknowledged in a mature way as it didn’t feel right that she just abandoned the man that made her feel alive again. 

Miles helped remind Jacqueline that she was a beautiful woman worthy of being loved — that’s not something you just forget, which is why she kept the article he wrote by her nightstand. 

It was a reminder of a time where she felt most like herself, and subconsciously, she aspired for that in her relationship with Ian. 

Ian handled the situation well, all things considered, and though the storyline was wrapped up too neatly, it’s good to see that therapy is working for the two of them. Jacqueline felt comfortable enough to be honest with him, while Ian actually listened to her concerns and wanted her to see herself the way he sees her. 

What did you think of the episode?

How will Sutton and Richard move forward?

Will Kat’s podcast take off? And will Jane find the self-TLC she needs?


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