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The Bold Type

The Bold Type – Trippin’ (2×09)

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Apparently, a classic Babs Brady involves turning her whole life around and sticking to it.

The Bold Type found Sutton rushing home to find her birth certificate in order to get an exported passport so she could attend fashion week in Paris. Why it isn’t mandatory for her to have a current passport is beyond me.

But the series needed some reason to introduce this storyline so let’s just go with it. Sutton grabs the girls for a road trip during which she repeatedly warns them about what a drunk her mother is. And it’s fair because Sutton had to grow up in this situation, was forced to raise herself, and slept in the back of Billy’s truck to avoid dealing with the mess that came from said benders.

Sutton has every right to be upset and hurt and not in the mood for patching things up.

Except as it turns out, people can change. Sure, her ex Billy is still living in that small-town mindset and he’s still a flirt, but he’s also married. And Babs isn’t a drunk anymore, she’s turned things around for herself.

Sutton claims she’s been down this road before with Babs getting sober just long enough for her to find another destructive obsession. And again, Sutton’s feelings are valid.

The only person that can’t seem to accept that is Jane who continues to push Sutton into forgiving her mother and finally drops the “at least you have a mother” card. I really hoped she wouldn’t go there, especially because avoiding-real-life-problems Jane who drank a little too much and smoked Kats parents’ weed stash was kind of bearable.

But, alas, she went there and while it may have been disguised as good intentions from a caring friend, it was problematic on many levels.

I’m sorry that you lost your mother Jane, but that doesn’t mean everyone else should suddenly love theirs. Especially if their mothers never acted like mothers and made their childhood a living hell.

Just because someone carries the title, doesn’t mean they deserve it nor do they deserve love and forgiveness and fourth or fifth chances.

That kind of thinking is so juvenile and entitled. Jane really thought that there was a reality where that was okay.

Now, is it good that Sutton opened up to the idea? Yes, of course! If she wanted to reconcile with her mother, then absolutely. But it should have been done on her own terms and not out of guilt that someone’s mom died before they got to know them. Now, I know I sound like a completely heartless person, but I’m just so sick of Jane thinking she’s better than everyone this season. Jeez.

She was dealing with accepting the news of how the BRCA gene would affect her fertility in the future.

During the previous episode when she told Ben about it, he was a little insensitive but show me a guy who wouldn’t be when his girlfriend of a few months was talking about future children.

And I get that Jane didn’t necessarily want to deal with such major decisions at the moment, but giving her pamphlets was his way of trying to inform her and allow her to make an educated decision. How is that grounds for drowning your sorrows in liquor with your ex?

Ben deserves better. He was thinking of her health and her future!

In the end, she figured out that sometimes, there are just things that you have to face; things that cannot be delayed no matter how much you try to.

But at that point, I felt like she wasn’t mentally ready for a guy who cared for her in a real way.

And maybe that’s just the show trying to shove her back together with Pinstripe again. I’m convinced he just rides the elevator up and down until he runs into Jane.

He claims he got a book deal and used that success story to convince Jane that he cares about her in a more serious way as well. Personally, I think Jane’s just been giving him false hope. Who will she choose? Why sabotage Dr. McDreamy for Pinstripe?

Does she think life will be easier with him around?

Then there is Kat who can’t make her mind up about this whole dating thing. At first, I was open to the open relationship decision because I felt like her relationship with Adena would benefit from it.

But now, it seems like Kat’s just hooking up with anyone that has a vagina and expresses the slightest interest in her. Is she even attracted to these people? Is there anything more here that’s stimulating her emotional discovery?

Half-way through a random hook-up with a small town bartender, she realized she wanted to be exclusive with Adena because Adena called her about a problem at Scarlet that we all knew was going to be a problem from the beginning.

By the way, there is no way in hell I’m going to believe that someone as accomplished and influential as Jacqueline couldn’t foresee the negative side-effect of turning off Scarlet’s comments and disconnecting the voices of Scarlet from the brand. I mean, isn’t that the whole point? To open up a stream of communication and encourage them to engage with the content that focuses on social and topical issues?

She needs to reread the magazine’s mission statement. Also, is it odd that the board is thinking of removing her right around the same time Anna Wintour’s rumored retirement from Vogue surfaces? I may be stirring the pot a bit here.

Truthfully, I blame that new female board member who has had it out for Jacqueline since their first meeting.

Anyway, back to Kat’s complicated love life. She realizes she loves Adena over the stupidest reason and then eagerly tells her she’s done exploring other women.

Yet, when Adena tells her she’s going to be working instead of grabbing brunch with her, it looks like Kat is regretting her decision.

It seems to me like maybe this whole thing was more about getting attention than getting to know herself, her wants and her needs.

Do you think this is something Adena and Kat will be able to overcome? Is Sutton’s mom going to follow through on her promise? Is Richard really getting this serious with that new girl he’s dating? How do guys move on so quickly from the alleged “love of their lives?” Methinks they will have a romantic reunion in Paris!

Are you hoping that Jane gets a cab and never returns? Same.


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Lizzy Buczak is the founder of CraveYouTV. What started off as a silly blog in her sophomore year at Columbia College Chicago turned her passion for watching TV into an opportunity! She has been in charge of CraveYou since 2011, writing reviews and news content for a wide variety of shows. Lizzy is a Music Business and Journalism major who has written for RADIO.COM, TV Fanatic, Time Out Chicago, Innerview, Pop’stache and Family Time.

The Bold Type

The Bold Type Season Finale Review – Not Far from the Tree (4×16)

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The Bold Type Not Far From the Tree

It’s rare that someone looks forward to a season finale, but season 4 of The Bold Type has turned into a hot mess and it’s best that they take a break, remember what made the show so groundbreaking in the first place, and hit the reset button on the season altogether.

Many fans have been vocal about their displeasure with the turn that Richard and Sutton’s relationship has taken. And I’ll admit, right now, it’s the least appealing storyline right next to whatever is happening with Kat… more on that in a minute. 

While Richard and Sutton’s relationship woes aim to showcase what happens when your happily ever after doesn’t go as planned, it’s ruining one of the show’s, nay, television’s, strongest relationships.

Richard and Sutton hit more than their fair share of bumps in the road, but they found a way to persevere, grow up, and grow with each other. 

It’s fine if the writers wanted to hone in on the idea that sometimes great love isn’t sustainable. Realistically, marriages fail for all sorts of reasons including different ideas for the future and disagreements about children. It’s valid. 

Both Richard and Sutton handled it the right way — she was outspoken and honest bout not wanting children, he left because he wants to be with someone who does. They both respected each other’s wishes even if it hurt like hell. 

It’s devastating to lose the person you thought you were going to spend your life with, so I expected to explore sulking Sutton, but I can’t stand behind and watch the show turn her into a homewrecker on the verge of alcoholism aka Babs 2.0.

Instead of rising from the ashes, Sutton is becoming her mother. When she went back to her hometown, she made some bad decisions, namely, hooking up with Billy, her old high school sweetheart who is married and has a family. She was seeking the comfort of the familiar after her reality got ripped away from her, which to some degree is normal, but I think subconsciously, Sutton wanted to prove to herself that she’s no better than her mom and doesn’t deserve this great life that she built for herself — with or without Richard. When Billy’s wife told her “she’s just like her mother,” it triggered something inside of her, and it seems like we’re going to see that downward spiral play out in season 5. I truly hope Sutton can get a hold of herself and not allow that destructive behavior, which is so easy to fall into, to bring her down.

At this point, Sutton is becoming her own worst enemy. And seeing her chug that liquor down towards the end of the episode is not only heartbreaking but alarming. Alcoholism runs in my family, so I understand how real it is and why it needs to be addressed, but I also always loved that Sutton wasn’t defined by her past or her upbringing. 

I also hope the series isn’t planning to bring Richard back into Sutton’s life to be her knight in shining armor. I’ve never been one to just turn my back on a couple I shipped, but I might have to jump ship here because it’s hard to see how these two could ever bounce back from what has happened. The Bold Type made choices that permanently severed the relationship between Sutton and Richard, and it needs to stay true to how that would play out realistically. There’s no fairytale ending here, and I can’t see them walking back to each other after this unless Sutton has a change of heart. But again, she was so decided that it is difficult to want that for her. 

Personally, I much rather see Sutton mourn the relationship and throw herself into work — we all want to see who Sutton is without Richard! 

My distaste for the demise of Sutton and Richard’s relationship has sucked the joy out of the rest of the episode, which found most of the ladies making some poor decisions. Well, everyone aside from Jane. 

Her romantic drama with Scott was on the back burner (thankfully) as she focused on a story for the Failing Feminist reminiscent of the real-life Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell controversy. A young woman came to Jane about abusive behavior from her male editor, which required her and other girls to clean up the room after the boss’ sexcapades with his mistresses. 

Jane and Jacqueline were both on-board to pursue the story with full force, but the latter changed her mind when her husband, Ian, mentioned that he dated Nicole Keating — the woman allegedly covering up for the scummy boss — while they were “on a break.” When Jacqueline first mentioned Ian worked at the company, I initially thought that Ian was going to end up being the pervy boss in the situation, especially since he and Jacqueline have been tirelessly working to fix their marriage. Thankfully, that wasn’t the case! 

Ian was simply concerned that if the story went public, it would not only threaten his family but paint Jacqueline in a bad light as she would look like the scorned lover looking to retaliate and targeting Nicole.

And Jacqueline, who has been working so hard on salvaging her marriage, agreed to nix the story. 

But honestly, when have “optics” ever stopped Jacqueline? I was shocked by her decision because it was so unlike her to put her own needs above a powerful expose. It’s a good thing Jane caught on and called her out on the behavior because as she pointed out, it went against everything Jacqueline taught her as a journalist. And if Jacqueline has so much confidence in Jane that she believes she’s “the future of Scarlet” (a major compliment to Jane, by the way), then she should have known Jane would figure it out. 

Will this destroy the relationship that Jacqueline and Ian were trying to mend? For some reason, I don’t see Iceland happening! 

And then there’s Kat, whose relationship with Ava isn’t doing her or her podcast any favors, but for some reason, she just cannot quit it. 

Considering the backlash The Belle received because they gave a voice to a conservative Republican for its first guess, it seems like being involved with someone like Ava has the potential of doing more harm than good. 

Also, wasn’t the point of the podcast to spotlight different views and members from all walks of life? I don’t understand the need to do “damage control” so quickly. Clearly, Kat hit the nail on the head with Ava as the first guest because it got people talking. Podcasts should explore the viewpoints of vastly different people. 

While I’m all for the idea of embracing new ideologies and being open-minded to opposing views — and frankly, that’s necessary sometimes in politics — it isn’t enough to justify the romance between these two. Kat has been so progressive in every step of her life and outing RJ Safford, Ava’s father, for his support of conversion therapy, was her boldest move at fighting corruption. By pairing her up with Ava and allowing her to catch feelings, it undermines the power and importance of that very decision and leaves us with a largely unimpressive Kat. 

Aisha Dee (who plays Kat Edison on the series) largely agreed as she took to Instagram earlier today to talk about the “confusing” and “out of character” relationship. 

“It was heartbreaking to watch Kat’s story turn into a redemption story for someone else, someone who is complicit in the oppression of so many. Someone whose politics are actively harmful to her communities,” she wrote. 

No one is saying Kat and Ava have to hate each other, no, they can respect each other, but I can think of countless better storylines more suited for Kat, who has been a trailblazer character throughout the show’s four-season run. The series botched the love story between Kat and Adena (who was completely missing this season), and it’s a shame that the best they could do is to use Kat as a prop in a relationship with a conservative white woman who, yes, is queer, but also, doesn’t protect her own community and stands for all the things that Kat doesn’t. 

Let’s nix this story going into season 5 completely. We won’t forget it happened, but we’ll forgive the misstep if we get a storyline that embraces Kat as the queer, Black, outspoken, boss babe that she is and gives her a worthwhile romance. 

There was a secondary plot featuring Alex and Andrew, who nails every scene. As Andrew’s drag persona, Jacqueline Carmichael, got praised for sticking up for Alicia in the bar, Alex was trolled for his inaction and called the death of masculinity. It’s unfair to judge his actions or assume his intentions based on a short, viral clip, but it shows us exactly how the world works. Too often, we pass judgments on people after watching a snippet and not hearing their side of the story. 

It was surprising to me that Alex didn’t think to address the situation on his “Ask Alex” podcast. It would’ve been better than taking cheap shots on Twitter at the author of the article as the issue stemmed from his desire to honor his girlfriend’s wishes of remaining independent. I’m sure he’s not the only man struggling to walk that fine line of when to interfere and when to let your girl handle her own issues, so the topic would be engaging and informative while also allowing him to clear the air and reclaim his “manhood.”

What did you think of the episode?

Sound off below, Cravers! 


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‘The Bold Type’s Aisha Dee Calls For More Diversity, Scrutinizes Ava Storyline Ahead of Season 4 Finale

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The Bold Type The Truth Will Set You Free Review

Ahead of tonight’s season finale of The Bold Type, Aisha Dee is calling out the series for lack of diversity. Additionally, she’s coming after an on-screen relationship that many fans are probably hoping to forget all about. 

Dee not only stood up for her character, Kat Edison, whose character development and storylines suffered in the latter half of the season, but for all the girls and women who look like her. 

In an open letter posted to Instagram, Dee said she was inspired by her own courageous, unapologetic, and outspoken character. 

“What would Kat do? She would take a stand and advocate for herself and all other marginalized voices to influence change,” Dee wrote. “I am ready to push harder and speak louder for what matters to me: The diversity we see in front of the camera needs to be reflected in the diversity of the creative team behind the camera.”

The actress said that during the show’s four-season run, the series had one Black woman that directed, adding,  it took “three seasons to get someone in the hair department who knew how to work with textured hair.” She added that it took “two seasons to get a BIPOC” in the writers’ room. And throughout the Kat and Adena torrid love story, no one in the writer’s room was a queer Black or Muslim woman.

Dee also expressed her frustrations with the “confusing” and “out of character” storyline of the season that found Kat falling for Ava, a conservative whose father supported gay conversion therapy. 

Fans have been vocal about how much they dislike the storyline and even protested it on social media, and Dee didn’t hold back when she explained she felt exactly the same way. 

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“It was heartbreaking to watch Kat’s story turn into a redemption story for someone else, someone who is complicit in the oppression of so many. Someone whose politics are actively harmful to her communities,” she wrote. 

She summed it up by saying that her words were coming from a place of love and care: “The Bold Type has done so much good, but it struggles to understand the intersections many of its characters live in,” she wrote. “For a show that frequently uses words like intersectionality, inclusion, discourse, and the various isms, I wonder how its stories may have been elevated had they been told through the lens of people with more varied lived experience.”

“By speaking out, I’m taking a risk,” she concluded. “It’s scary, but it’s worth it. This is not judgment. This is a call to action. We deserve to see stories that are for us, by us.”

Sounds like something our girl Kat would say! 

We’ve seen Kat’s fearlessness pay off on screen, and it’s heartwarming to know that it carries over into reality. Shortly after Dee posted her letter — and got the support of her two on-screen and real-life besties Katie Stevens (Jane) and Meghann Fahy (Sutton) — Freeform and Universal TV responded in a joint statement acknowledging the issues she raised. 

“We applaud Aisha for raising her hand and starting conversations around these important issues. We look forward to continuing that dialogue and enacting positive change,” the statement said. “Our goal on The Bold Type is and has always been to tell entertaining, authentic stories that are representative of the world that Kat, Jane and Sutton live in — we can only do that if we listen,” it added. 

Let’s hope that come season 5, the series will nix that terrible love story and give Kat a worthy romance that embraces her as queer Black woman. 


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The Bold Type

The Bold Type Review – [Spoiler] Breaks Up (4×15)

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The Bold Type Love Review

The ladies of The Bold Type found themselves navigating the various exciting and/or complicated stages of love that propelled their relationships in new directions — some for the better and some for the worst. 

The episode strayed from the usual format focusing individually on Jane, Kat, Jacqueline, and Sutton’s relationships, which was necessary for the big reveal towards the end as it provided a resolution to the Sutton and Richard baby drama. 

Richard and Sutton fell under the “unconditional love” because that unconditional love has carried them through some really tough times and got to where they are today. 

But unfortunately, it wasn’t enough. 

If you’ve been paying attention to their romance of the years, the outcome wasn’t entirely shocking, but it was heartbreaking nonetheless and will allow Meaghann Fahy to explore the most vulnerable and emotional parts of her character. She’s been doing such a great job with bringing the feels and delivering those gut-punching scenes that I have no doubt she’ll follow through in whatever the writers throw her way.

Though, admittedly, I’m not a fan of the dissolution of Richard and Sutton. It makes sense following their self-discovery, but it’s not a storyline I wanted to pursue as a fan of the couple who has overcome all odds. 

I was hoping we’d get to see them navigate the age difference with Sutton learning to prioritize her career and her marriage while her friends were still in the “discovery” phase. Finding your heart’s desire is a blessing but it can also be a curse when it happens so young and you don’t have anyone your age that you can relate to. Sutton was setting a great example. 

It would have also allowed Sutton’s character not to repeat her mother’s mistakes by being a good and loving mom to her future children. Through her relationship with Carly, we know Sutton has what it takes to be a great mother.

However, once the writers made the choice that Sutton knew she didn’t want kids, they had to go with it without hesitation. 

Richard and Sutton moved mountains to be together, but sadly, disagreeing on wanting children is not something they could get over, push aside, or ignore. As much as it pains me to see them go their separate ways, there wasn’t any other way this could have resolved itself that wouldn’t end up in some form of resentment from both parties. 

While you usually want to talk about children prior to the wedding, it wasn’t either of their faults because they weren’t being honest with themselves or each other. They wanted things to work so badly, but it’s like putting a square puzzle piece into a circle. No matter how hard you try, it doesn’t fit. 

They love each other so much that Richard knew letting Sutton go was the right thing in the long run no matter how much it hurts now. 

However, this also brought up some interesting points about how Richard was always bending to please Sutton. Will she still like her life now when he’s not in it?

While Sutton has made some sacrifices for Richard, I’ll agree that for the most part, he’s been the one giving things up to make her happy. And I’m glad that it didn’t happen this time. Richard drew the line because he wanted a family more. 

In a way, it almost seemed like Sutton thought he would once again concede and put her desires first — she seemed sure of it, and when that wasn’t the case, the gravity and reality of the situation caved in on her. 

The Bold Type would’ve been sending the wrong message had one of them compromised on such a major decision. And hopefully, they don’t bring them together again with one of them changing their minds because that’s unrealistic. They were both confident in their choices and again, while I wasn’t pleased with where the narrative was heading, I respected that they stood firm in their wants and beliefs. Sutton and Richard are both headstrong, independent who never waver in what they want. The only way this storyline holds its power is if they stay broken up. 

Kat and Jane both fell under the umbrella of “forbidden love” because their romantic interests aren’t exactly 100% kosher in the workplace or in society. 

Last week’s episode of The Bold Type revealed Kat had the hots for Ava, the super conservative daughter of the former Scarlet head honcho, RJ Safford, that cost Kat her job after she exposed him.

I’ll be blunt that I’m not into this relationship at all. I don’t think Ava has good intentions, and I don’t think Kat, who risked her career to out his stance on conversion therapy, would willingly fall into his daughter’s arms. It doesn’t stay true to her character — a character who doesn’t conform to be comfortable, who stands up for her beliefs, and who aims to use her voice for better.

There’s finding common ground with Ava, and then there’s bypassing everything you stand for because you’ve got the hots for her. 

But for Kat’s sake, Ava was also feeling the vibes. 

After the successful launch of Kat’s podcast, the ladies let go of all that pent up chemistry and well, you know things are going to get complicated. The relationship doesn’t make much sense as the ladies butt heads on nearly every point, but since when does love follow any sort of logic? 

Jane’s relationship with Scott didn’t progress nearly as quickly as Kat’s with Ava, but after following a story together centered around a sexist workplace that fired and refused to hire attractive women out of a fear that they would be a liability for men who cannot control themselves amid the “Me Too” movement, Scott took the opportunity to shoot his shot. It was an odd moment to lay out his feelings, for sure, but he had a fair point about the difficulties of working with someone you’re attracted to. 

We know Jane felt the same way despite it making things complicated because she’s his boss. I’ll be the one to point out that workplaces romances very rarely end well and things are bound to get awkward, but at least Scott proved to be respectful because he made it clear he wouldn’t pursue Jane if she wasn’t into it. He obviously differs a great deal from the men in their expose. 

Jane didn’t need to leave him hangings as she clearly reciprocates his feelings, but she was also surprised by his boldness and transparency. The moment caught her off guard, and she was saved by the bell thanks to an emergency call from Sutton. 

At the end of the day, relationships come and go, but friendship is forever. The Bold Type has made that their mission statement and this drove that point home tenfold. Friendship trumps everything including relationships that are in the heat of the moment. 

Sutton sent up the bat signal and her girls answered! And it’s a good thing because there’s never been a moment that Sutton needed the ladies more. 

The episode would have done well by just focusing on the three ladies, but in excelled by incorporating Jacqueline’s romance. She’s been going to therapy with Ian to get their marriage back on track, so they fittingly fell under the umbrella of “rekindled love.”

The first step is wanting to make things better in a relationship, the second step is to actively make those changes. Ian and Jacqueline attempted by playing tennis together, but Ian eventually snapped and called her out for undermining him and always needing to be right. 

Jacqueline’s pride got in the way, again, and she rejected the notion that her behavior was dismissive, but after chatting with Richard about his drama with Sutton, she realized she was always shutting down anything Ian said because she was afraid of being vulnerable and hurt again. 

If there’s anything to take away from Sutton and Richard’s relationship its the importance of listening to your significant other and taking their thoughts and ideas into consideration. 

The fifth love story focused on Alex and Alicia in the “complicated love” phase. He wanted to respect her boundaries and the fact that she was an independent woman, so he didn’t intervene when some guy was hitting on her at the bar, but he realized, she needed it.

Love can be complicated at times, but you always have to follow your gut. It was a minor love story, and I have to say, it wasn’t Alex that shined in the scene, it was Andrew in drag!

The Bold Type explored love in all its different stages before honing in on the very idea that friendship is forever and the only constant. 

What did you think of the episode? Are you happy or sad about Richard and Sutton? 

Do you like Ava and Kat’s relationship? And do you think Jane should pursue something serious with Scott or is she crossing a line?


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