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TV Reviews

The Boys Review – Homelander hooks up with Stormfront?! (2 x 05)

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Episode 5 of The Boys Season 2 “We Gotta Go Now,” ends shockingly with Homelander and Stormfront joining together in more ways than one.

Stormfront, who’s actually a Supe formerly known as Liberty, with a history of Neo-Nazism (or some other kind of superiority complex) got under Homelander’s skin in the previous episode by killing Kimiko’s brother Kenji and scores herself some points on her public image.

Meanwhile, Homelander has been on edge and has increasingly become frustrated with everything that’s going on at Vought and the Compound V scandal.

And things take a turn for the worst for the diabolical Suped-up villain when this happens . . .

Watch Where You’re Pointing Those Laser Eyes!

As shown in the above video, Homelander accidentally kills an innocent bystander while haphazardly dealing with a Supe-terrorist. Consequently, this drops his approval rating by a whopping 9 and 1/2 points, which definitely doesn’t sit well with him.

He struggles to repair public perception regarding the incident and nearly loses his cool at a rally protesting him when he imagines just cutting everyone down with his laser vision.

The Boys: Homelander laser-visions crowd

He manages to keep a level-head but his attempt to appease people doesn’t go as planned, so he reluctantly seeks the help of Stormfront and her army of meme lords and queens.

As a result, Homelander’s approval rating jumps back up 5 points, and he thanks Stormfront for the assist. She then sarcastically asks how he’s going to pay her back, and the scene that follows is straight bonkers.

Homelander and Stormfront Get . . . Super-Kinky

What can only be described as a match made in superhero hell, the two deviant Supes engage in some intense, gratuitously masochistic, and superhumanly physical sex.

Their unlikely union has some hellish implications that could lead to some diabolical misdeeds, which means bad news for everyone. How this situation shakes things up is definitely one of the must-see dynamics to look forward to in the series.

Other Key Events In This Episode

  • Billy goes back to his aunt Judy’s home where he leaves his dog, named Terror, for safekeeping. Terror, of course, comes straight from the comic books and his likeness to the source material counterpart is uncanny.

  • The “Dawn of the Seven” movie (a clear reference to the DC Extended Universe film– there’s even a Joss Whedon reshoot joke throw in) is underway that doubles as a sort of farewell performance by A-Train as well as a way for Homelander to mess with Maeve by backhandedly complimenting her sexual orientation and parading her to the public as an LGBTQ+ symbol along with Elena, who gets forcibly roped into the public relations campaign.

 

  • On top of that, Starlight and Stormfront have growing tensions on set as both know each other’s secrets and blatantly threaten to expose each other. Though neither do so just yet and both continue to bear with the “Girls Get It Done” propaganda.

 

  • Billy, in a depressive state after failing to rescue Becca, tries to sacrifice himself to save Hughie, MM, and his aunt Judy against Black Noir, who has tracked them down and set his sights on assassinating Billy. They only escape their demise when Billy issues a clever bluff – exposing Homelander raping his wife and hiding his son Ryan from public view.

 

  • Kimiko becomes a hitwoman for hire as a way to cope with her brother’s loss, and Frenchie (unsuccessfully) tries to comfort her. The two come at odds and Frenchie walks out on her. That might be the smart move for now because Kimiko is on a rampage and is doing things like, well, this . . .

  • The Deep is married now but it’s all so obviously fake. He even goes on an interview with Katie Couric to publicize the relationship all in an ill-conceived attempt to rejoin The Seven.

  • Shawn Ashmore (better known as Bobby Drake/Iceman from the X-Men films) makes a brief appearance having a phone call conversation with Stormfront. He’s rumored to be playing Lamplighter, another Supe from the comics.

Episode Rating: 9.0/10

The Boys new season 2 episodes stream on Fridays on Amazon Prime Video.

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Lorenz Bacani is a pop-culture enthusiast who's trying to watch as many good comic-book movies and TV shows as superhumanly possible. He received a bachelor's degree in Journalism and New Media at California Baptist University. Wrote for a news tabloid, worked for a couple of non-profits, and dabbled in some photography (mostly for Instagram purposes). He is probably currently binge-watching an old TV show for nostalgia.

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season 9 Episode 5 Review – I Make a Promise, I Will Never Leave You

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Chicago Med Season 9 Episode 5 Review - I Make a Promise, I Will Never Leave You

It was a rough shift for everyone on Chicago Med Season 9 Episode 5. The episode focused on plenty of heartbreaking cases, which naturally take a toll on the doctors who do their best for the patients who walk through their doors. 

One of the newest members of the team, Dr. Ripley, responded to help an elderly man suffering from hypothermia, who seemed disoriented and kept calling out for someone named “Betty.” While Alzheimer’s and dementia came to mind, especially due to Jimmy’s elderly age, a CT scan revealed something much more horrific: the patient was the victim of a lobotomy conducted at Med roughly 60 years ago. Ripley and Charles surmised that Jimmy was a problem child, so they took care of it by messing with his brain, not giving him a chance at a full life. Jimmy ventured to the hospital hoping to help his sister and caretaker, who took a fall at home, but by the time PD got an address, they were too late and she passed away due to natural causes. Ripley had to break the news to Jimmy, who, in his regressed state of mind, couldn’t understand what was happening—and it was gutwrenching to watch. Ripley felt so bad when he called social services, in fact, that he promised to visit Jimmy so that they could talk about Betty, knowing that the man had no one else looking out for him and was let down by his loved ones for so many years. 

The case also hit close to home for Ripley, who had disciplinary issues as a teen and who felt abandoned by those who should’ve helped him, something Dr. Charles apologized for when he was his psychologist. The nature of the relationship between these two remains one of the most compelling storylines this season.

Another newbie, Dr. Zola, tapped in Dr. Marcel when Alex’s parents brought him in with concerns over his very high heart rate. He ended up needing appendix surgery, but during the procedure, they found cancer before running into some trouble with one of the drugs they used to wake him up from his anesthesia, nearly killing the 14-year-old. Zola insisted that Med pull the medication immediately, but Crocket knew that it wasn’t that easy, and after he brought it up in one of the meetings, the board decided to keep it in rotation and make a case to the FDA. When Zola said she’d pursue it further, Crockett advised her to drop it, and with all the hot water she’s gotten herself in during her short time at Med, she should probably heed his advice for now—though I do anticipate we’ll see this storyline pop up down the line with everyone eventually agreeing that Zola’s instincts were right. 

Dr. Charles’ tough day also included getting his longtime friend, Bert, checked out at Sharon Goodwin’s request. Ever since Bert came into the ED after falling while watching his grandson, there have been concerns about cognitive decline, particularly since his family has a history of dementia. And since Bert is the kind of person who refuses to see a doctor, Goodwin had to get creative, though when they finally sat him down to have a chat about their concerns, he felt ambushed and bolted out. It’s scary to be told that there may be something happening with your memory, but the signs are all there and it’s important to get ahead of it. Eventually, he came around to the idea, agreeing to get further tests if it gets Sharon off of his back.

Dr. Asher took on a patient brought in by Dr. Johsnon (you know I’m happy to see him coming around more often). The couple’s dream pregnancy turned into a nightmare when the woman’s water broke at 15 weeks and the doctors refused to do a D&C for fear of legal repercussions. Instead, they sent her away and kept telling the husband that the situation wasn’t an emergency as she carried a dead fetus and developed an infection. Eventually, he trekked from his rural home to Chicago to seek out help before it was too late—and by that point, the woman had gone into septic shock. It was touch and go there as Asher tried to save the woman’s uterus while also preventing her from hemorrhaging out during the operation. Everything ended up just fine, all things considered, with the couple candidly exploring future options for their family that they were both comfortable with. Without fully touching upon the complexities of the current laws surrounding pregnancies and miscarriages, Chicago Med showed the dangers of laws that work against women, their choices, and their safety.

And finally, Dr. Archer was unable to save a patient that his son brought into the ED who was having shortness of breath. Sean, who is a counselor at a rehab facility, put all of his faith in his father, but sometimes, things are simply out of everyone’s control, which was hard for him to accept as he was full of hope and positivity, trying to help people with their second chance at life. While it’s unclear what caused Damon’s fluid in the lungs, it may have been caused by persistent drug use, which led to heart failure, and meant he was too far gone to be saved. I’m just hoping that Damon’s death doesn’t send Sean off the deep end or make him second-guess his career path—it’s just a reminder that life doesn’t always work out the way you want or expect it too. 

Maggie assisted Dr. Johnson throughout his visit, all while getting her divorce papers officially notarized. When the moment finally came, it was nice to see her get the support of Asher and Zola, while also acknowledging that she has an interest in Johnson… when she’s finally ready to get back out there again. 

What did you think of the episode? Did it pull on your heartstrings?

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Chicago P.D

Chicago PD Season 11 Episode 5 Review – Split-Second

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Is 'Chicago PD' New Tonight? Everything We Know About Season 11 Episode 5

Atwater does it again, but that’s really no surprise. Kevin Atwater episodes of Chicago PD are consistently the strongest—delivering complex issues, a riveting performance, and making us all question why LaRoyce Hawkins isn’t allowed to take the wheel more often. 

And would it kill them to give him a love interest so he doesn’t have to carry this burden all on his own?

On Chicago PD Season 11 Episode 5, Atwater responded to a robbery in progress on Jeweler’s Row, but the situation quickly escalated as the robbers proved to be dangerous and careless, firing shots that killed the store owner and hit an innocent bystander, who ended up bleeding out to death.

The moment was one that haunted Atwater for much of the episode, as the wife of Corey, who was trapped between the safety door, blamed Atwater for making a conscious choice to try to save the owner over her husband. 

And she’s not wrong—Atwater went to check on the other man, allowing the impenetrable doors to close, preventing him from rendering life-saving aid to Corey. 

He was filled with instant regret knowing that his choices could’ve made a difference, and while we know that it’s simply Atwater’s personality to want to take accountability, the case showed that sometimes, despite our best efforts, we can’t change the outcome. And we can’t save everyone. 

It wasn’t stated in the episode—and Atwater said time and time again that he didn’t know why he chose to check on the owner instead of Corey—but my guess is that he didn’t imagine that the doors would be impossible to break through. He likely also felt that the injuries of the owner may have been more extensive than Corey’s, and felt the need to prioritize helping him. 

At the end of the day, he followed his gut in a split-second, trying to make the best decisions for everyone, and there’s not much more you can ask for when it comes to the person responding to a critical situation. 

He went back to the scene of the crime, retracing his steps an replaying the situation over and over in his brain, making himself feel guiltier, particularly when he found the keys under the shattered glass, which could have bought Corey the necessary time until the paramedics arrived, but that’s all hindsight and doesn’t change what happened. Atwater can learn from it, but he needs to let himself move on for his mental health, especially as Voight pointed out that there is no handbook on who you should save first. 

Atwater’s regret aside, the episode was action-packed as they tried to identify the two robbers, who were leaving behind a trail of victims during their heists. The key person to helping them make a break in the case was Teresa. They knew she saw one of the suspects as there was video footage of her looking him in the face before he put his mask on, but when confronted, Teresa insisted that there was a “glare” and she saw nothing.

Considering the suspects took off with every victim’s driver’s license, I’m not surprised Teresa chose to stay quiet as she feared retaliation against her family. She already lost her husband, and she didn’t want to put her husband in harm’s way. 

While Voight’s tactics of pushing her to talk or charging her with obstruction of justice may have seemed harsh, it was necessary to motivate her to help them make a break in the case. (I’ll be honest, I first thought that Teresa was keeping the suspect’s identity a secret because it was someone she knew/someone connected to her son, so I was glad that wasn’t the case.) 

But the sad reality is that even if she hadn’t identified the suspect, they could’ve still come for her to silence her since they knew that she saw one of their faces, which is exactly what happened. They didn’t care if she sold them out—if she could, she needed to be taken care of. Working with the police and giving them what they needed sooner may have ensured her safety as they could’ve caught the bad guys, but I’m also not surprised that there’s a distrust of police, in general, but also specifically for Teresa.

Teresa felt betrayed by Atwater since he didn’t save her husband—it’s all she could focus on. Not to mention that even though Atwater told her that they would have units watching her house until the bad guys were caught, he couldn’t guarantee her safety as the moment one of the suspects broke into her home, no one was stationed outside of her home because they were switching shifts. They dropped the ball, and if it wasn’t for Atwater’s quick thinking, it could’ve cost her and her son their lives. 

Atwater went above and beyond on the case, as he felt a sense of responsibility to the family, but he also found himself with conflicting emotions after he shot Aiden and asked Teresa for assistance with putting pressure on the wound, which she refused to do because “he didn’t deserve to live while her husband died.”

And, quite honestly, as a victim who is grieving a major loss and feels betrayed, I totally get where she’s coming from. This is a man who killed her husband and who broke into her home to kill her and her child without a second thought. If Atwater wasn’t there, he wouldn’t have shown her any mercy, so why did she have to take the high road in this case? 

On the other hand, Atwater is not in a position to pick and choose who he saves. He has sworn to serve and protect—so while he stopped the suspect from hurting someone else, he also has to render aid and do everything to prevent the suspect from dying. Atwater did his job, even if the outcome wasn’t fair. And honestly, when is life ever fair? 

As we’ve seen time and time again on Chicago PD, there are many inner struggles that come with being a cop, and no one feels guilter, harbors more regret, or is harder on themselves than the cops that find themselves in those tricky situations, toeing the line between right, wrong, and necessary. 

Thankfully for all of us, Atwater has always excelled in those storylines, rising to the occasion every single time. 

What did you think of the episode? 

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Tracker

Tracker Season 1 Episode 2 Review – Missoula

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Tracker Season 1 Episode 2 Review - Missoula

Justin Hartley’s new CBS series Tracker is one of the most promising this season. 

He was fantastic on the ensemble series This Is Us, but he’s swiftly proving that he’s worthy of being a leading man—not just a pretty face, but one that delivers the action and stands on his own. 

Hartley’s Colter Shaw takes on some of the most dangerous cases as he fills a void inside by helping to find people who have gone missing or who have been taken. 

The second episode of the series dived headfirst into a cult situation, taking our hero to Montana. Though it would be understandable if Colter turned right around and ran the other way at the first sign of danger—no reward money is worth messing with a manipulative cult leader who isn’t above violence and murder—he rushed in without hesitation. 

Not only does Colter see a resemblance in Seth and his own father, who was also manipulative in his own right, but he actually cares about the missing people who come across his desk; he’s not doing it just for the check, he wants to help people who need a little bit of a push. 

Colter immediately clocked that there was something much more going on than just a missing person when he was ambushed by a security team that threatened to shoot him when they saw him breaking into Rebecca’s house. 

Soon after, he learned of her connection to Positive Light, a place that preys on people looking for guidance, support, and whose pain they can exploit, trading in secrets that can be used as blackmail for allegiance. It’s a classic cult operation from head to toe, but unfortunately, those who are in too deep are usually too blind to see the truth—unless it’s shoved in their faces. And even then, depending on how far they are in their “practice of self-actualization” they might not be convinced. 

Thankfully, Colter seemed to make a slight breakthrough with Jackson, whose parents reported him missing after his strange relationship with Rebecca led to a series of uncharacteristic life choices like quitting his job, abandoning his family, and draining his bank account. 

Jackson wanted someone to believe in him and help him believe in himself, which is why Seth and Rebecca were able to get to him, but he was also self-aware, so when Colter began questioning the cult’s “mean” tactics, he knew something was off even if he wasn’t ready to turn away fully. 

The strangest part was that while Positive Light presented as your typical cult, there was no negative press about it—not even any forums or threads of people complaining. And every trail of lawsuits went cold. However, Bobby discovered that the cult may have covered up the murder of their former accountant, which was the string that Colter was able to pull on to help unravel everything. 

Tracker Season 1 Episode 2 Review - Missoula

Tracker Season 1 Episode 2 Review – Missoula

After getting a confirmation from David Grassley’s wife, Jana, who told Velma and Teddi (who appear to be Colter’s handlers for lack of a better word) that Seth showed her the dashcam footage from her husband’s hit and run in order to scare her into silence.

Knowing that there was evidence to bring the place down, Colter found his in via a Positive Light member who was following him (rather badly, might I add). Once inside of Seth’s instructional office, he was able to pull up David’s file, along with Rebecca’s, before proving to Jackson that he was being lied to and told what he needed to hear so that he would remain obedient, especially since his role in the cult was so critical as the new accountant. 

But as we say, anyone who tried to leave or expose what was going on, would immediately be taken out. 

It seems as though Seth should’ve listened to Rebecca about not letting Colter get too close to Jackson, though he was so convinced they had the latter wrapped around their finger. 

Thankfully, Colter knows how to fight—and he was able to stave off Rebecca and Seth until the police got there and shut the whole operation down once and for all. 

The eerie thing is that Seth did have a way of reading people accurately; through his Google search, he dug up enough intel on Colter to figure out that he was in pain because of his past with his father, a pain that he still carried with him till this day.

And while Colter isn’t easily shaken, you could tell he was a little triggered that someone was able to pick up on his past, even if he wasn’t willing to admit it.

Colter’s backstory has a lot of impact on his present (even if people are more resilient than you imagine, eventually the cracks do begin to show), not only his choice of career path but there’s still no closure as to what happened to his father. His brother, who seems to have pushed his father to his death, keeps reaching out asking Colter to hear him out, but his mother, told him to ignore his sibling, so it’s clear she’s also hiding something. Not to mention the beginning of the episode where she called her son because someone broke into his father’s office. There’s still a lot to unpack here, which only adds to the intrigue of the series. But even without Colter’s complicated backstory, Hartley is easy on the eyes (and has a huge fanbase already thanks to his NBC drama), his acting is believable, and at its core, it’s a procedural, so watching him solve cases is clearly something that has the potential to pull in a huge audience.

What did you think of the episode? Are you enjoying the series so far?

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