Connect with us
The Good Place Patty Review The Good Place Patty Review

TV Reviews

The Good Place Review – An Imperfect Paradise (4×12)

THE GOOD PLACE -- "Patty" Episode 412 -- Pictured: (l-r) D'Arcy Carden as Janet, Kristen Bell as Eleanor, William Jackson Harper as Chidi, Ted Danson as Michael, Manny Jacinto as Jason, Jameela Jamil as Tahani -- (Photo by: Colleen Hayes/NBC)

Published

on


We finally make it to the Good Place and it is everything that’s been promised. Unfortunately, everything that’s been promised isn’t necessarily everything one would hope.

Nor was this episode “Patty” exactly what I had hoped, so let’s start at the beginning.

The front half of this season is too slow. I mentioned in my review for “Help is Other People” that the show seemed to be treading some water the first half of the season, and now with “Patty” under our belt, I’ve even more reason to feel this way.

This show needed another episode dedicated to discovering the Good Place. Some of what happened in “Patty” is what I referred to in my review for “You’ve Changed, Man,” when I discussed the potential pitfalls of the humans coming up with their new afterlife plan too quickly. That episode avoided those pitfalls by having the crew take the length of the episode to debate and discuss the best plan moving forward.

“Patty” does not avoid those pitfalls. It barely raises its problem before offering the solution, and therefore greatly undercuts the drama.

The problem is that the Good Place isn’t quite all it’s cracked up to be, as the residents there lose their passion and joy and lead meaningless lives. Turns out that everlasting perfection tends to get boring, resulting in brains becoming mush and hopes and dreams becoming empty.

Good ol’ Eleanor Shellstrop comes up with a solution, though; let people leave. For good. Let them walk out a door and let their existence in the universe end, AKA permadeath. The idea behind this solution is that an ending will give the residents’ afterlives meaning again, and being allowed to leave once they feel they’ve accomplished everything will give them peace.

Let me be clear here – the solution to the Good Place is perfect for this series. I absolutely love it. It makes me sad and happy all at the same time. It’s a commentary on life and on stories, and is a culmination of the series’ messages and ethos.

But damn, if it isn’t a quick turnaround.

Due to the fast pace of this episode, the story has to plow through the set up of the problem. Hypatia of Alexandria, AKA Patty, ends up mostly telling the characters what the problem is instead of letting them, and us, naturally find it.

If there had been an extra episode dedicated to the Good Place, we could have not only seen more of Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jason’s fantasies come true, but started to piece together that something isn’t quite right on our own.

Jason would have been the perfect vehicle for this as well. His impulsiveness makes him the perfect candidate to encounter the Good Place’s soul draining euphoria, as he would have burned through each of his fantasies quickly, leaving him the first to feel the emptiness of eternal heaven.

The episode tries to do this with Jason, but his entire journey happens off screen, and by the time he returns we already know what the problem is so his journey is inconsequential.

Imagine if the reveal at the end of season one happened three episode into the show. There would be too little time for the characters and audience to build up their own interpretations of the environment before the reveal. This is what I feel happened in “Patty.” We barely spend any time in the Good Place, and don’t get to discover for ourselves what it is about before we’re told what it is about.

I wish the experiment at the start of season four would have ended an episode sooner. That time could have been used to journey around the Good Place with our characters, giving them time to settle into their paradise only to feel something was off and for us to discover that with them.

As for Eleanor’s solution; it comes too quickly. There is no build up to her revelation and no input from any other character. I also feel this solution maybe should have come from Michael.

Michael has grown so much and learned all about what it means to be human, it would have been a very touching moment had he been the one to recall his lessons from Eleanor and realize what the people of the Good Place need.

Despite my gripes, the problem of the Good Place and the solution provided are excellent.

Providing the lifeless eternals an avenue for what is essentially true death is a haunting and beautiful sentiment. I wish there was more time spent with the rumination of this concept, because it really hits the themes of the show out of the park.

The Good Place has a plot about characters in the afterlife trying to avoid eternal damnation to achieve eternal bliss, but it’s always been about the connections the characters make with each other during this journey.

Based on the The Good Place’s philosophy, being a person is about making these connections and trying to be a better person today than you were yesterday. If you have eternal tomorrows, though, what drives you to improve? What drives you to do anything?

“Patty” posits that the gift of time is only a gift if there is a limited amount of it (even if that limit is decided by you). What you do with your time is only valuable if there is only so much time you have to fill. It makes what you choose to fill it with important.

I love this concept so much it hurts, and it makes me super salty that we didn’t get more time to explore this idea with these characters.

Take away “Employee of the Bearimy” and add in another episode of the characters in the Good Place so the plot here has time to thicken and build some tension. Let the humans personally begin to feel the lackluster bliss of the Good Place and have Michael’s tenure as the head honcho of the Good Place force him to reflect on his time becoming human.

Maybe we even could have been given enough time with one of the Good Place residents to develop an attachment to them, and experience the elation they feel when Eleanor announces the ability to leave.

As it stands, though, I feel “Patty” is a great concept slightly muddled by some imperfect execution.

There is one episode left, and just as I said about “Mondays, Am I Right?” it’s hard to completely judge “Patty” without knowing what is coming next, since the ending of this episode’s storyline feels very finite.

“Mondays, Am I Right?” gets a minor bump upwards in my viewing due to this episode. The team’s success at creating a system that will push more people into the Good Place provides some good tension for this episode, since soon, due to their new system, more people will end up in the Good Place and suffer the same soul sucking paradise that’s been plaguing the Good Place for centuries.

Anyway, salt aside, there is a lot to love in “Patty.” The Good Place feels fully realized and milkshakes are made of stardust. Tahani talks about caviar on Jello-O shots and Chidi has never been more excited than he is meeting Patty.

Beautiful touches such as the squad walking arm and arm into their perfect party together and Jason realizing that he’d rather be with his friends than go-karting with animals are examples of what has made the series sing over the past four years. The story of these characters is here, and it coalesces nicely with the plot of the episode.

As time passes I know I will look back at this episode and be happier with what it provides instead of being disappointed in what I feel was left on the table. The story here is excellent; it’s just a bit too quick.

For now, though, I wish their time this season was a bit better spent.

Other Musings:

  • Janet slips up and says she was born.
  • I thought Michael’s anxiety over being in the Good Place was going to be his focus in the episode. This would have been a GREAT storyline if there was an extra episode here.
  • Michael’s line about never signing his name before pulled at my heartstrings for some reason. I wish there was more time for moments like these.
  • Michael’s robe is ridiculous and classic Good Place visual comedy.
  • Love that they rebuild the neighborhood. Gave me some Lost vibes, as the most important time in their lives was the time they spent together, so their paradise is a return to their original afterlives.

NEW MUSIC CUE ALERT – I believe we finally have a new major music cue for when Eleanor reminds Michael that he is in charge of the Good Place and can make a door that allows residents to move on. This is my favorite moment of the episode and a reminder at how essential music is to make your moments land. This cue almost saves the moment from not having enough build up. Almost.


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Chicago Fire

Chicago Fire Finale Review: The Magnificent City of Chicago (10×22)

Published

on

Chicago Fire The Magnificent City of Chicago Review 10x22

Wedding bells are ringing, and Casey makes his grand return for Chicago Fire’s epic season finale!

After Severide got jumped by a gang last week, it was time to plan a wedding! Herrmann gathered the entire firehouse together, and gave everyone (except Emma) jobs that will secure the quickest wedding setup in history. Stella even asked Boden to give her away at the altar. Despite the writing saying that Casey might not show up, Casey showed up! It was great to see Jesse Spencer back in the role we’ve gone so used to seeing him play for the last ten years.

With Sylvie back in the house, she threw Stella a surprise makeshift bachelorette party, which was freaking adorable. On the other hand, Casey and Severide had one of their old fashioned bro moments, since it is most likely going to be the last one we see of them.

Disaster struck as the venue they thought they had booked, had to go back on their word, as a previously cancelled wedding decided to be back on. Casey came to the rescue once again, as he bought out a tour boat for all the guests, and the captain of the ship will be able to marry Severide and Stella.

Severide started to meet with several officers who were looking to start a case against Thomas Campbell, who runs a narotic ring and organized the attack on Severide after the food truck case. While heading to talk to the investigators, Severide was attacked again, but shoved the henchman out a window in self-defense. Regardless, Severide still committed to testify to help the investigation.

The showdown between Emma and Violet came to a head as well. Sylvie returned to Chicago, and Violet filled her in on all of the blackmailing schemes that Emma has started up against her and Hawkins. Hawkins went to his higher ups and wanted to find a way for Violet to somehow escape this situation, even if he had to take the biggest hit for it.

A house fire brought some news to light about Emma. Violet, Stella, Gallo, and Emma were helping a pregnant woman next door neighbor who was hit with debris, when the fire started spreading to their location. Everyone else was calm, but Emma wanted to high-tail it out of the building without everyone. The fire stressed out Emma, and she bolted, abandoning the team inside. The team who had the guts to stay helped deliver the woman’s baby with flames all around them.

Hawkins, who arrived at the fire, saw the whole thing unfold, and discarded the blackmail, and fired Emma for abandoning her crew.

Casey gave Gallo his favorite axe, as he doesn’t use it a whole lot out in Oregon. This is quite literally the passing of the torch for the future of Firehouse 51, as Gallo is sure to grow as a firefighter in future seasons.

At the end, the wedding began, with John Legend’s “All of Me” playing, and I rolled my eyes since that was one of the most cliche things possible. They both had adorable wedding vows which I’m sure actors will use for future audition monologues.

Chief Boden danced during the party, and I think that’s the only important thing I’ll ever need to see on my screen the rest of the year. However, the door did close on Sylvie and Casey, as she decided to stay in Chicago, and he is going back to Oregon, where his life really is.

It wouldn’t be a finale without a cliffhanger! As Stella and Severide begin their honeymoon in a cabin, a mysterious truck silently arrives, assuming it might be someone hunting Severide.

This was a great finale! It tied up the loose ends of Emma’s situation (see, I told you there would be a loophole to get her out)! We also got Casey’s full conclusion, and even though it is the end of his time here, we at least get Sylvie back in Ambulance 61. Who knows, maybe they’ll continue to reference Casey in every episode like they did after he left. Season 11 is sure to be some great twists and stories, with Severide having to go against this narotics ring, and adjusting to married life. I think sparks are in the air for Violet and Gallo…again.

What did you think of tonight’s season 10 closer? Leave a comment below.


Continue Reading

Chicago P.D

Chicago PD Season Finale Review – You and Me (9×22)

Published

on

Chicago PD Season Finale Review - You and Me Season 9 Episode 22

Wow, that was an emotionally heartbreaking conclusion to a multi-episode arc on Chicago PD. 

Anna gave it her all to bring down Escano and Los Temidos, but it wasn’t without casualties. 

On the Chicago PD Season 9 finale, Anna got too muddled in the case and lost her way. And admittedly, Voight also lost control of the situation. 

He didn’t want to admit it, but this is the first time that we’ve seen Voight slightly unhinged by a case. It was also the first time we’ve seen him so emotionally connected to a CI.  

Upon realizing that they were burned, Voight extracted Anna, who began spiraling almost immediately at the thought of what comes next. 

Voight tried to assure her that it wasn’t over and that he wouldn’t let anything happen to her, but Anna lost faith in herself and Voight a long time ago. She was convinced that without any evidence against Escano, she would end up like all of his men — dead. 

The gutwrenching thing is that if Anna had just listened to Voight and trusted that he was good for it, she would’ve come out of this on the other side because everything that Voight promised came to fruition. If she stayed put, she would’ve been in witness protection for a short moment, she would’ve reconnected with Rafa, and she would’ve been able to see the fruits of her labor. She would have watched as the Chicago PD made the biggest drug bust in history all thanks to her. 

She would have gotten her revenge, she would have gotten recognition, and she would have gotten a fresh start. 

But sadly, none of that happened. From the moment they found Escano on the ground bleeding out at the bakery, it was a downward spiral. 

Escano’s dying declaration was that Anna stabbed him. 

Anna went off the rails, escaped the safe house, and killed the man she thought was going to kill her. She didn’t think that Voight would follow through, so in her mind, killing Escano was worth the risk because at least she would be safe. 

Voight thought he could still salvage the case, and he went to great lengths to save Anna mostly because the guilt of bringing her into this was consuming him. 

He never wanted it to go south, and when he’s in charge of cases, they usually don’t, so he was almost navigating new territory.

But he was willing to risk it all to make sure that she got out as promised. 

I wanted to hate Anna for leaving behind such a mess, but the truth is, I understood her motivation and fear. The kill was, in a twisted sense, justified. 

The ASA questioning is what really set Anna’s rogue plan into motion because it fed into her biggest fear — that they didn’t have anything on Escano. 

They didn’t have any evidence of him committing any crimes, so there was nothing to move on. It wasn’t far-fetched to think that he would become a ghost and fade away into the background, and Anna worried that she’d constantly be looking over her shoulder after betraying him. 

The fact that Voight lied to her also played a role because she didn’t feel like she could trust him. It’s hard to trust that a cop doesn’t have his own best interest at heart, and Anna couldn’t see that Voight wasn’t like the others. 

She led him, Jay, and Hailey (“where you go, I go”) on a wild goose hunt that ultimately ended in a way too public situation. 

Voight was all about doing things on the down-low, but Anna’s actions brought too much attention to everything. There was a time when Voight could have likely figure out an escape plan, but once she pointed the gun at him in the middle of the street, it was a lost cause. 

At that point, Anna wasn’t in the right state of mind. She was spiraling because she killed a man, she was spiraling because she wanted to get away — it was a mix of fear and adrenaline all wrapped up in an explosive combo. 

Voight tried to talk her down from a ledge, but the more he pressed, the more she pushed back until she finally pulled the trigger and shot him in the shoulder. 

From there, it was all a whirlwind. Everything happened so fast that I had to rewind and rewatch a few times. 

Of course, Hailey and Jay both took a shot at Anna when they saw her shoot Voight because a shot at the police is a shot at the police, it doesn’t matter what relationship you have. 

But even then, Voight remained by her side because he knew he dragged her to the depths of hell partly for selfish reasons. 

Chicago PD Season Finale Review - You and Me Season 9 Episode 22

CHICAGO P.D. — “You and Me” Episode 922 — Pictured: Carmela Zumbado as Anna — (Photo by: Lori Allen/NBC)

Anna’s actions weren’t indicative of her personality, they were a byproduct of the situation she was placed in. I can’t say she was forced into the situation because she willingly volunteered her efforts throughout the investigation — and while Voight did push her a few times when she said she wanted out, it’s because they invested too much time building up the trust. 

The moment she took the shot, you could tell she regretted it. Her final words were an apology to Voight; It seemed as though she regained a form of lucidity after being shot and realized that she contributed heavily to the deteriorating situation. 

Unfortunately, Anna didn’t survive the two gunshot wounds to the chest. She died at the hospital with Voight by her side. It was a truly emotional moment, especially when you consider the guilt that he’ll carry with him and the fact that she didn’t get to see Rafa one last time. But mostly, it was tragic because it didn’t have to be this way.

As doctors were trying to revive her as she coded, their “clear’s” paralleled the “clear’s” echoing from the unit as they searched the stash house.

And it was a gold mine as they unearthed so many drugs all linked to some of the biggest drug dealers in the city. 

It’s a shame Anna never got to see this moment come to life, but she can rest easy knowing that she helped Chicago clean up its streets. No other young woman or man is ever going to fall victim to Escano’s evil ways. 

My only wish is that we found out how Escano caught onto Anna. Was he the one who ordered her rape and was able to identify her?

The fact that moments prior to his death he blew up a truck full of drugs would have allowed Voight to easily pin this on a rival gang. Ugh, I’m just so sad Anna didn’t reach the finish end!

It was refreshing to see Jay finally in Voight’s corner. Halstead has his moments. He’s a pretty straight and narrow kind of guy, but even he couldn’t deny that Anna didn’t deserve to pay the price for what occurred. 

I do, however, like that he reminds Voight that he needs to button up the situation. Voight sort of had rose-colored glasses on as he assumed his will to help Anna would be enough, but Halstead came at it more pragmatically. He wanted to find an actual solution that would stick and keep everyone safe — Anna and the team. 

Upton rode my last nerve because she just couldn’t get off her damn high horse. Why is she so infuriating? It’s understandable that she wouldn’t want to go down this road again, but the judgment was so sickening. Covering up a murder was fine when it was a case that she felt passionate about, but because she didn’t really care for Anna, she wanted to hold some moral high ground. 

Wanting to stay on the right path is admirable, but you can’t be a hypocrite about it. Instead of preaching about it, it would’ve been helpful if she gave some kind of solution instead. She could’ve shown some remorse or some desire to help Anna out of the mess. 

I don’t have to remind her that where there’s a will, there’s a way, even if it doesn’t seem obvious at first. And I love that Halstead hit back by reminding her that they went the extra mile for her when she needed it.

The thing with Voight is that he doesn’t just go astray or cover up crimes for anyone — when he does it, it’s understandable because he knows that the system is rigged and often favors the person that should be paying the ultimate price. 

Sometimes, you just have to return the favor, Hailey. 

This job has never been black or white, and she’s naive to think that eliminating the gray spaces is possible. She came around in the end, but honestly, it was too late at that point. I know this sounds mean, but maybe she should’ve just taken some time following the explosion to recover. 

I love Ruzek, Bugress, and Atwater. They remain unproblematic. When Voight says to keep it off the books, they’re all like “weird, but okay.” They didn’t question — they just followed orders and delivered the Los Temidos gang on a silver platter. That’s not always the case with them, but they definitely get a gold star this time around. 

Voight was also a beast when he convinced Chapman — sorry, forced — to give pull strings and get him arrest warrants. 

He knew that he could deliver the cartel to Chapman, and if she agreed to help, he would credit her with the bust and build up her career. 

Chapman made the right choice in the end because wow, you do not want to get on Voight’s bad side. He knows the moves to destroy a career just as quickly. 

A special shout-out goes out to whoever managed to get everyone on board with a shirtless Voight. It was a bold choice considering it wasn’t exactly a “thirst trap” friendly moment, but I’m petitioning for more opportunities like this one.

And lastly, props to Carmela Zumbado on her performance! Her character was such a riveting addition to the season, so it was a shame to see her go out like that! 

What did you think of the finale? Was a part of you hoping that Anna would somehow turn her whole life around and go from CI to murderer to detective? Did you think Voight pushed too hard to save Anna or was it justified? Do you think Voight is too corrupt for the gig or does he have integrity by helping those who have helped him?

Share your thoughts in the comments — and we’ll see you for new episodes in the fall! 


Continue Reading

Chicago Med

Chicago Med Season Finale Review – And Now We Come to the End (7×22)

Published

on

Chicago Med Season Finale And Now We Come To The End Season 7 Episode 22

Chicago Med brought the heat for the season 7 finale! 

The final few moments of the episode were life-changing for a handful of characters. 

Having Halstead testify in the VASCOM trial was likely saved for next season, but it’s unclear if he’ll even survive in order to make it to court. Okay fine, who am I kidding, we know Halstead will survive, but keeping his life hanging in the balance does make things slightly more thrilling. 

The apartment complex fire connected back to Milena, real name Jo, who was gearing up to skip town after her cover was blown by a dirty cop. Can someone tell me why I’m convinced the dirty cop is Dylan’s father? The fact that she asked Dylan if he trusts his dad was such a red flag. 

Milena had an in with the Bosnian mafia, but we knew that they began suspecting her when they saw how cozy she was with Dylan at the hospital. 

It wasn’t exactly surprising that one of the men found her hideout and tried to take her out for being a “traitor,” but it was surprising that Dylan and Halstead also went down with the ship for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Dylan’s feelings for Milena got the best of him. If he hadn’t paid her one last visit to say goodbye, he likely would’ve been spared. However, he also wouldn’t have been there to defend her. 

When Milena was ambushed by the hitman, Dylan fought him off and took the shot. Milena knew it wasn’t safe to stick around, so she made a break for it, which is when she realized she was also injured in the scuffle. All the blood tells me that she’s not going to make it far without seeing a doctor. 

Dylan’s “do no harm” oath kicked in, so even though he knew the man was part of the mafia and a huge threat, he couldn’t leave him behind to perish in a burning building. He risked his life to save him, as did Halstead, who heard the shots and ran back to lend Dylan a hand. That’s when they became trapped in the hallway with no escape, engulfed by flames on both sides. 

Of course, this is the perfect lead-in for a #OneChicago crossover. If it doesn’t happen, it’ll be a huge missed opportunity. Chicago Fire’s squad can put out the flames and get Dylan and Halstead to safety, while Chicago PD’s team can build up the case against the Bosnian mafia and clear Milena’s name once and for all. 

It would be awesome for Riley Voelkel to stick around as a recurring character and Dylan’s love interest as his tether back to law enforcement, which he just can’t seem to shake. 

Plus, they’re a cute couple, and we don’t have many of those left around here. 

That is if Dylan and Halstead even get out in time or survive the following hours. For those of us who have seen This Is Us, we know what happens when someone endures too much smoke inhalation. 

I definitely feel for Halstead since he just purchased this complex with the money he got by being a whistleblower in the VASCOM scandal. 

I know the insurance money will likely cover the damages, but it’s just one blow after the other for him. And right when it seemed like things were finally stabilizing in his life. 

It’s safe to assume that Halstead got his resident, Hannah Asher, to safety prior to running back into the burning building to assist Dylan. Right before the fire, Halstead and Hannah agreed to a clean slate as “neighbors.” Admittedly, it’s a much better meet-cute than a doctor who helps a woman while she’s overdosing. 

I know the series is really trying hard to make this Hannah and Halstead relationship happen, but I would really rather it didn’t happen. One sweet moment between the two of them doesn’t erase the fact that they never see eye-to-eye, especially when dealing with patients. 

Earlier in the day, they had two very different approaches when it came to dealing with a joint patient.

Julia was rushed to the ER after experiencing discomfort with urination. Her boyfriend, Owen, wanted her to get checked out since she was donating an organ to him the following moment. It definitely seemed like the couple was madly in love and the stars just aligned for them,  well that is until Owen confessed that he wasn’t in love with Julia and was torn about whether to tell her the truth and risk having her change her mind about the transplant. 

Halstead then confided in Hannah even though it was clear that he had already made up his mind about how to proceed with the information. He didn’t want to sabotage Owen’s chances of getting an organ transplant because he knew that if Julia backed out, Owen might have to wait years for another shot. 

However, Hannah argued that they were essentially conning Julia into the transplant and that she had every right to know the truth. 

Eventually, Owen had a chat with Hannah who encouraged him to tell Julia the truth. And I’m glad he took her advice because she was right. 

Yes, the worst-case scenario was that Owen might lose a donor, but it was the morally sound thing to do if he ever cared about Julia at all. It was her choice — a choice she was making from a place of love — and she deserved to know all the facts before making a decision about her body and life. 

Julia was hurt by the breakup, but she agreed to go through with the transplant regardless because she wanted to save his life. She knew that she was Owen’s only shot, and wouldn’t let something as trivial as a breakup stand in his way. 

At the end of the day, Julia proved that she loved Owen no matter what. It wasn’t a transaction — Owen didn’t need to repay her by promising eternal love; he just simply needed to acknowledge the sacrifice she was making for him. 

And the fact that Halstead was supporting to deceptive approach really goes to show you what kind of man he really is. There are moments of kindness from him, and then there’s this. It sets us back every time. 

Dr. Choi and Dr. Archer treated Zach, Peter’s son from legal, who suffered a leg injury from lacrosse that meant he wouldn’t be able to finish out the season and get scouted by college reps. He was pretty torn up about it and lashed out at his father, who admittedly wasn’t a fan of the sport. 

After losing his father and harboring a ton of resentment, Choi had a little heart-to-heart with Zach. It may have been too late for him to fix things with his dad, but that doesn’t mean he can’t help others make amends before it’s too late. 

And it was the perfect segue to his father’s navy funeral. Choi regretted all the things he didn’t say or didn’t know, and when he was handed the flag as the next of kin, he passed it on to Gerald. It was a sweet gesture that acknowledged that he approved of his father’s secret life and welcomed Gerald into the family. 

The moment also encouraged Archer to reconnect with his estranged children, so we’ll likely see his personal life expand next season. 

Speaking of children, Sharon Goodwin’s birthday dinner turned into a delivery with a view. Her daughter, Tara, went into labor while they were having a celebratory dinner at The Signature Room at the 95th. 

It’s a good thing Tara was dining with doctors because when the staff informed them that the elevators were down, she had to throw her birth plan out the window and improvise. 

Sharon assured her that she was in good hands as she’s delivered hundreds of babies.  And there’s nothing more special than delivering your grandson into the world. 

Tara and baby were both happy and healthy following the emergency delivery! 

Maggie admitted a patient named Donna, who was an alcoholic suffering from end-stage liver disease. Charles deemed her unfit to make any medical decisions, so they called her daughter, who basically laid into her mother for all of her mistakes. 

It was brutal to watch as she told her unconscious mother that she’s been dead to her for years. There was a lot of resentment there, but at the end of the day, a child cannot help but love a parent despite their flaws.

The moment convinced Maggie to make the call to Vanessa’s birth father and set up a reunion. Vanessa finally met Grant at Grant Park (fitting, right?), and though they didn’t say much, it sure seemed successful. 

Grant seems like a stand-up guy who has an interest in getting to know his daughter. And honestly, I think Maggie is in trouble because when she laid eyes on Grant again, you could tell she was smitten and feeling all the feels. Ben doesn’t deserve this, but you know it’s coming. 

The series doesn’t typically venture outside of the hospital walls, but it was nice to see some Chicago landmarks incorporated in the finale.

There was a lot of focus on children and their parents. 

Dr. Charles finally told Anna about his relationship with Lonnie, but once he finally got it off of his chest, he realized that he was never scared of telling his daughter, he was scared of saying it out loud to himself. 

Almost immediately after the realization, he informed Lonnie that he was breaking up with her. For a therapist, she didn’t seem to handle the emotions that come with a breakup very well, but Charles had a valid point — she knew way too much about him and his past for this to ever work. 

He couldn’t get past their patient-therapist connection, and he felt as though she was criticizing, judging, or assessing his every move based on the profile she built on him. You can’t blame him for feeling like he was under the microscope. And as a therapist himself, he gets it so there was no blame either. 

Pamela finally went under the knife for her spinal issues, but when Sam ran into a complication, Crockett overrode Avery’s decision about her mother’s treatment because Pamela granted him power of attorney. 

Seeing as though Sam and Avery both agreed on the procedure that they thought Pamela would want, it was obvious that Crockett’s choice was the least popular one.

Pamela wanted Crockett to approach it as a doctor, but he was too influenced by his personal feelings. He was paralyzed by the fear of losing her, so instead of agreeing to the risky procedure that she would’ve preferred, he chose the safe one that threatened her motor skills. 

I don’t know why Crockett ever thought that Pamela would forgive him for sabotaging her chances of operating again. The very fact that she wouldn’t be able to operate led her to put off the procedure in the first place, so that should’ve told him everything he needed to know. 

The decision was so simple, and yet, Crockett messed it up.

Things were going well for them as a couple, and I was rooting for them, but it doesn’t seem like Crockett will bounce back from this, especially since she feels like she made the wrong choice by trusting him instead of her daughter.

And Avery already has a dislike towards Crockett, so she’s definitely going to take her mother’s side on this one.

Poor Crockett — he meant well, but it’s going to cost him the woman he cares so much for. 

What did you think of the Chicago Med season 7 finale? Will Dylan and Halstead survive? Will Milena/Jo survive?

How will Pamela punish Crockett? 

Share your thoughts in the comments below, and we’ll see you in the fall! 


Continue Reading

Trending