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The Good Place Monday's Am I Right? Review The Good Place Monday's Am I Right? Review

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The Good Place Review – The New Afterlife (4×11)

THE GOOD PLACE -- "Mondays, Am I Right?" Episode 411-- Pictured: (l-r) Manny Jacinto as Jason, William Jackson Harper as Chidi -- (Photo by: Colleen Hayes/NBC)

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“Mondays, Am I Right?” starts and completes the human’s new afterlife plan. Michael and Shawn begin working together, Vicky and insecure Chidi return, and Janet reveals her dirtiest secret.

The return of insecure Chidi is a little surprising, since he seemed so fully transformed in the previous episode. I feel like this storyline maybe should have happened earlier in this season, but that wasn’t feasible due to Chidi’s erased memories. At worst, it felt like a regression of his character, but on the better side, it reminds us that the Chidi we’ve spent the last four seasons with is still in there and still has fears. Just because Chidi is his “best self” doesn’t mean he’s his “perfect” self, and he shouldn’t be. Nobody is perfect and we all have fears.

Jason, on the other hand, proves his worth by knocking some sense back into Chidi. Jason (for probably the first time in the series) slightly grated on my nerves last week, as he played no major part in creating the new afterlife system and his dimwittedness actively interrupted their planning. He seemed prepped to continue on this track at the start of “Mondays, Am I Right?” when he is helping Eleanor and Chidi sort out good people. He quickly names the Kool-Aid Man a top person (which isn’t necessarily a wrong choice), and then leaves Eleanor and Chidi to do all the work.

Instead of being superfluous, though, Jason gets to not just help Chidi with sound advice, but show genuine irritation at everyone’s assumption that he’s a total idiot. I really wish he would have been a more integral part of the creation of their new system because this moment would have landed even better, but as it stands, his reference to Romeo and Juliet and the offense he takes to Chidi being shocked he read it reminds us that Jason is a product of his environment and not necessarily just a dope.

Tahani hasn’t had much to do this season, but she gets a good showing this episode. Not only does she participate in the training of the demons, but her experience in swallowing her pride makes her a natural fit to encourage Michael to bring Vicky back. Her and Janet’s assumptions as to Michael’s motivations may have been wrong, but they display growth none the less. Janet’s growth comes from her admittance that asking for help is necessary sometimes, not because she ever had trouble asking for help, but because she’s grown human enough to realize that even she needs help sometimes. I can’t imagine what Alexa knows that Janet doesn’t, though.

Michael’s journey is the heart of this episode, and as it has in the past, parallels the show’s own journey. Michael, throughout the series, has been a demon with a purpose; whether that be torture, redeem, or save humans, he’s always had a task driving him forward.

With the completion of the new afterlife system, and having found someone who can run it better than he can (which is Vicky), he’s essentially out of tasks. He doesn’t know what his purpose moving forward will be, and the purposelessness scares him. What’s eternity mean if you’re doing nothing with it, anyway?

I don’t know. Not even Janet knows. But Michael does the right thing and places Vicky in charge, sacrificing his purpose for the betterment of all humans.

The rock has been pushed up the hill. By Michael, yes, but by The Good Place as well. “Mondays, Am I Right?” basically completes the show’s storyline, but we still have two episodes left.

So what’s next?

The team ends the episode sailing upwards towards the real Good Place, and having completed the overhaul of the afterlife, there seems to be no goal left for them to chase after. So some sort of conflict must arise once they get there.

“Mondays, Am I Right?” will be difficult to have a fully formed opinion on until that new conflict starts. The episode seems underwhelming, but its position in the narrative implies that this isn’t the endgame, and therefore it will be naturally underwhelming so close to an unknown finale. What sort of conflict will this system lead to? Will it end up not working? Will it continue to work perfectly and the final storyline only be tangentially related?

The other reason it feels underwhelming is it doesn’t lead anywhere. There is no implied next chapter within the episode. All there is is Janet telling Michael that he’ll just have to find out what is next. Once again, Michael’s journey reflects the show.

The fate of humanity may be solved, but what is next on The Good Place will determine the fate of this series. Until we can see where it goes, my understanding of this episode’s design is limited.

I’m optimistic, though.

Other Musings:

  • “It’s the way it’s always been done” is my least favorite reason for anything.
  • Vicky’s use here pleased me. I don’t know why, since I don’t feel she ever did anything to deserve getting her dream of being in charge, but it seems as though she chilled out once she felt someone trusted her. Maybe that’s just me trying to find a reason I liked her here.
  • 1.28 Jeremy Bearimy later, so we have zero idea of how much time passed.
  • The golden balloon is back!
  • FOLES!!!

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The Cleaning Lady

The Cleaning Lady Review – Arman’s Velorio (3×07)

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The Cleaning Lady Review - Arman's Velorio (3x07)

With each passing week, The Cleaning Lady makes audiences feel the weight of Adan Canto’s passing more and more. 

The mark that Canto made on the series is evident—and moving on without him hasn’t been easy. We all feel cheated from a storyline that we deserved, but, as with loss, all we can do is relish in the moments that we carry in our hearts and grieve alongside all those he touched. 

Thony and Nadia are affected the most on the series as they were the two women that were closest to him. 

Thony feels responsible for his death, considering that he risked his life to save hers in the hide speed chase in the desert. She also feels the heaviness of the words left unsaid, a reminder not to hide your feelings from the person who means the world to you.

But even though we were all rooting for a Thony and Arman relationship, it’s hard not to feel for Nadia, who lost the love of her life for the second time. She didn’t get closure or a chance to say goodbye, which some might say Thony got through that brief exchange with Arman right before the car plunged off the cliff. 

As Nadia also admits, she lost Arman a long time ago when Thony entered their lives—and nothing she did was able to bring him back and restore their lives to how they once were. But she held onto that hope for so long, with his death now making his absence permanent. 

She might hate Thony, but in a way, they are also bonded for life as the women who knew Arman best. They share a connection, and now, with the uncertainty of who can be trusted lingering at every corner, I think they’ll be forced to rely on each other more than ever. Grieving together to keep Arman’s memory alive, while working together to keep each other safe. 

Arman’s family, Jorge and Ramona, can’t be trusted. It’s unclear where they stand with each step. They believed Thony when she showed them that Dante was responsible for Arman’s abduction—and Ramona even proved how ruthless she was when she executed her lover on the spot—however, after Arman’s parents arrived at the velorio and called her Marina, Thony realized it was the name Arman wrote on the table where he was held captive. This can only mean that his aunt was involved in his kidnapping, though it’s unclear if Jorge was also involved or if he’s being kept in the dark. 

Did Ramona kidnap Arman to get money from Nadia? And who called the feds ahead of the exchange? Was it Dante and Ramona? Did she ever actually care about her nephew or was it one big act?

And then there’s the Thony problem. She was handed an out on a gold platter—and she still refused to take it. Hasn’t she learned her lesson? You’d think after all that’s transpired, she’d call it quits on this lifestyle and prioritize taking care of her child. 

Instead, she feels the need to avenge Arman’s death by making the people responsible pay, which, in the process, is going to cost her and her loved ones. She just can’t let it go, but it’s such a dangerous situation to keep putting yourself in. 

Upon Arman’s death, the finger-pointing started immediately, and there’s no telling how far Jorge and Ramona, specifically, are willing to go to protect themselves. 

While some of the family and the “who called the feds” drama took away from Arman’s memorial, the creative forces still managed to pay their respects to the character that Arman built over the course of two seasons—the hero to Thony and her son. It’s why Thony feels responsible and like she owes him because he always saved her, up until the very end, never once hesitating even if it made things inconvenient for him. The significance of Thony wearing all white to his memorial—while everyone dressed in black—was also crystal clear as she was his guiding light in life, the one who tried to pull him out of the darkness that continuously enveloped him and, as a result, her. 

The moment when Thony gave Luca the model car belonging to Arman—which he held onto for all these years—and asked him to keep it safe is what really broke me. It was such a simple yet effective scene, paired with Arman’s final ride into the sunset, a scene from the season 2 finale that set up Thony and Arman’s power couple arc, a storyline that we also had to mourn and say goodbye to. 

There’s also the new men in Thony’s life that are a bit concerning. Jorge, of course, for many obvious reasons, but Jeremy, who was part of the chase that led to Arman’s death and who still has plenty of questions about what transpired. He’s the only one who can place Thony at the scene—and I’d imagine Nadia wouldn’t be pleased to find out that Arman might’ve survived if he wasn’t one again playing hero for Thony. I also don’t trust Jeremy’s intentions with the security cameras. Does it give him access to see what’s going on in Thony and Fi’s household?

What did you think of the episode?

Keep Reading and Supporting CraveYouTV: Vanessa Morgan Is Finally Getting the Recognition She Deserves With ‘Wild Cards’

 

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The Cleaning Lady

The Cleaning Lady Review Season 3 Episode 5 – All of Me

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The Cleaning Lady Review Season 3 Episode 5 - All of Me

The Cleaning Lady Season 3 Episode 5 thrives on keeping us—and Thony—in a state of constant anxiety.

Not only is it nerve-racking that she has a court date that will determine whether or not she can keep Luca, but when her interview with CPS’ Susan nears, Luca is nowhere to be found. 

Thony tries to play it off as though he’s just running late, but when Fi and JD return home without him, it’s pretty clear that something else is going on. Susan is not easily fooled, and she quickly catches onto the fact that Luca has gone missing. 

While finding Luca was Thony’s top priority, she knew that jumping the gun and putting out an amber alert would come with grave consequences—not only for her court case but also for her relationship with the cartel.

JD’s call to tell Susan about Dante, the man who picked Thony up earlier in the day, came from a good place as he thought he had Luca’s best interests at heart. It’s hard to be mad at him when he was just following his gut, but man, when he gave Susan all the information, as someone who understands the kind of people that Thony is in bed with, you knew that it wouldn’t end well for her.

Thankfully, Thony is like a cat with nine lives, and she always lands right-side up. She was able to find Luca at the aquarium (he previously said he wanted to be like a turtle and hide in his shell), and was able to convince Jorge to expunge the amber alert so that it couldn’t be used in court and against her. 

Jorge is proving to be a lot like his cousin—he has a soft spot for Thony and is swooping in to save her at every turn, even though she doesn’t exactly deserve it. She’s more trouble than she’s worth, quite frankly, but men can’t seem but to get invested in assisting her. 

Fiona, Jaz, and Chris all took the stand to attest to how good of a mother, aunt, and friend Thony is, but it was her own testimony about going to great lengths to save her son that pulled on heartstrings. 

The judge agreed to let Luca stay with his mother, with continually CPS supervision, which was a huge win. 

But one thing that really bothers me is that the court wasn’t there when Thony was running out of options for her dying son. The judge didn’t care that she didn’t have money for treatment, nor did anyone care that he would’ve died without it. It’s so easy to look at something after the fact and deem it wrong, but how can saving your child’s life at any cost be wrong?

Thony will never apologize for what she did because if she didn’t do it, Luca wouldn’t have been here. 

And the only reason Luca ran away in the first place was because he didn’t want to be taken from his mother. The court might think they are doing their due diligence, but look at the stress that this whole situation has placed on him.

It may have been a huge victory for Thony, but it also came at a potential price as the amber alert meant that Dante was in a prison cell when the call for a ransom exchange came through, meaning that they lost their shot at getting Arman back—and no one seems to know if he’s dead or alive at this point. 

Though, I have to say I agree with Jorge more than Ramon—giving into the ransom seems weak, so I hope she has a bigger plan in place for getting her nephew back.

I also find it strange how Fiona is constantly surprised upon finding out who Thony is working with. How did she think Thony managed to arrange her transport back to the States? Wouldn’t she assume that the cartel—or someone equally as dangerous—had to be involved? Thony has a lot of pull and resources at her disposal, but it comes at a price. 

Whether that price will prove to be worth it in the end, well, only time will tell.

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Chicago P.D

Chicago PD Review Season 11 Episode 8 – On Paper

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Chicago PD Review Season 11 Episode 8 - On Paper

I’ll take extremely frustrating Chicago PD episodes for $500. 

Because yeah, Chicago PD Season 11 Episode 8 was the definition of the word frustrating. The issue wasn’t with the storyline, as it was strong and kept viewers on their toes, but it was the characters’ poor decisions that made you let out a deep groan. 

If your infant goes missing, you damn well better tell the police everything you know and everything that can help them locate your child. The secrecy was irritating because it hindered any developments, plus, they seemed to think they’d be able to hide something from a unit of dedicated detectives. 

The truth always comes out, so when they located the infant’s kidnapper and found a picture of Trent, the father was forced to confess that he was—and still is—a serial cheater. 

If that wasn’t bad enough, the parents then came clean about the fact that they left their teeny tiny daughter home alone for a few hours while the mom confronted her cheating husband during one of his dates. I mean, just give these people the award for “Terrible Parents of the Year” because they deserve it. 

Regardless of the parents’ actions, Intelligence, with Hailey Upton in the lead, worked tirelessly to bring sweet little innocent Grace home. 

Once they learned of Trent’s affair with Terry—which resulted in a pregnancy and forced abortion—they had a motive for the kidnapping. The good news is that Grace was never in too much danger as Terry really wanted the girl and cared for her, however, anyone who has it in them to kidnap a child is also unhinged and their behavior is unpredictable so you have to approach with caution.

A huge focus of the storyline was Upton’s team-up with Petrovic, the SVU detective who assisted on Noah’s case, whose expertise was supposed to help them find Grace quicker. Instead, it proved to be a distraction as Upton quickly sniffed out that something was wrong and a whiff of her water bottle proved it: Petrovic liked desk duty because she was boozing it up at work. 

She’s essentially a high-functioning alcoholic, which, for most people, is a clear red flag, but even after Upton confronted her about it (that was big of her because she could’ve just reported it to Voight), she dismissed her behavior and made it clear that she wouldn’t be seeking out help, nor did she think there was any need for an intervention. She even went as far as comparing it to running, which just shows you how delusional she is. 

It put Upton in a really difficult spot as, I’d imagine, she’s legally obligated to report it. How will she handle it moving forward? Will this be the catalyst for her to leave Intelligence behind and get a fresh slate (so she doesn’t end up like Petrovic, who said she had 3 divorces in the past)? I don’t see Upton as the kind of person who turns a blind eye, especially as it poses a risk for those she works with. 

She may be “one of the best” in her field, but she can’t continue on like this for too long. 

Thankfully, when she took the shot to save Upton at the train station when Terry pointed a gun at Upton, it was a good and justified shot, but it could’ve ended way worse. 

Voight is still recovering from losing Noah and seems frustrated with the lack of progress on the case of figuring out the serial killer’s identity, but that’ll be the focus of a future episode. 

And next week, we’ll see Torres’ poor decision of pursuing a romantic relationship with his mark play out. How will it end for him?

What did you think of this week’s episode?

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